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1997/10/29 City Council Agenda PacketCity of Rohnert Park 6750 Commerce Boulevard Rohnert, Park, California. 94928 ROHNERT PARK CITY COUNCIL AGENDA REVISED Tuesday, October 28, 1997 5:00 p.m. 31ORKSESSION - PUBLIC 1fEARM!Cj Santa Rosa Subregional Long Term Wastewater System Alternatives .1) Review by Ed Brautyer, Assistant City Manager, City of Santa Rosa . -2) PUBLIC HEARING 3)-Council discussion/direction 6:00:p.m. CLOSED SESSION - COUNCIL WILL MEET INCLOSED SESSION IN THE :CITY MANAGER'S OFFICE PRIOR TO THE REGULARLY SCHEDULED MEETING TO CONSIDER: •Litigation matters (G.C. 54956.9) •Personnel matters (G.C. 54957) 7`.00 p.m. REGULAR SESSION - Open Call to Order, .Pledge of Allegiance Roll Call.(Flores Mackenzie Reilly_Vidak-Martinez_Spiro_j MOMENT OF SILENCE 1N MEMORY OF . Julie Yonemura, a City Commissioner of many years, Current Chairperson of the Sister-City(s) Relations Committee, & Member of the Cultural Arts Commission 1. Mayor's Report on Closed Session (G.C. 54957.1) 2. Approval of Minutes - October 14, 1997 3. Approval of Bills 4. Adding information items, or items to be agendized at a future meeting (if any) 7:05 p.m. 5: YOUTH REPRESENTATIVES to the CITY COUNCIL from 1997-98 Youth 'of the Year Program selections •Recognizing Youth Representatives Sr. Adam Romero & Jr. Jessica Batacao •Youth report/comments, if any 7:10 p.m. 6. Unscheduled public appearances: For public comment on agenda items or other matters (limited to 3-5 minutes per appearance & a 30 minute total time limit, or allocation of time based on number of speaker cards submitted) NOTE: Time shown for any particular matter on the agenda is an estimate only. Matters may be considered earlier or later than the time indicated depending on the pace at which the meeting proceeds. If you wish to speak on an item under discussion by the Council which appears on this agenda, after receiving recognition from the Mayor, ..please walk to the rostrum and state your name and address for the record. PLEASE FILL OUT A SPEAKER CARD PRIOR TO SPEAKING - Rohnert Park City Council Agenda - October 2$, 1997 Any item raised by a member of the public which is. not agendized and may require Council action shall be automatically referred to staff for investigation and disposition which may include placing on a future agenda. If the item is deemed to be an emergency or the need to take action arose after posting of the agenda within the meaning of Government Code Section 54954.2(b), Council is entitled to discuss the matter to determine if it is an emergency item under said Government Code and may take action thereon. - DISABLED ACCOMMODATION - If you have a disability which requires an interpreter or other person to assist you while attending this City Council meeting, please contact the City Offices at (707) 793-7227 at least 12 hours prior to the meeting to ensure arrangements for accommodation bythe City. Please make sure the City Manager's office is notified as soon as possible if you have a visual impairment requiring meeting materials to be produced in another format (Braille, audio -tape, etc.) Action 7:40;p,m. .7. CO.NSEN.T CALENDAR -All items on the consent- calendar Wit! be considered in Coto by one action of the Council unless any .Councilmember. or .anyone else interested in. any, matter on the consent calendar has a question about same. A. Acknowledging the City Manager/Clerk's report on posting of meeting's agenda B. Accepting Cash/InvestmentsReport-for Month End, August 31, 1997 C. Resolutions for Adoption: 97-188 Supporting Saturday, November 15, 1997'."America Recycles Day" .97-189 Supporting Thursday,, November •20, 1997 as The American Cancer Society's "Great Arnerican'Smokeout" 97-190 Approving the Secorid.Amendmeni to the Lease -Agreement with.the Boys & Girls Club for Rental Of Space at 435 Southwest Boulevard 97-191 Approving Contract Agreement with •County of, Sonoma to Render . Services for Municipal Elections 97-192 Rejecting the Claim of Ayling Wu c/o Law Offices of John L. Burris - and Victor Hwang of Asian Law Caucus (re. alleged wrongful death of husband, Kwanchung Kao) 97-193 Rejecting the Claim�of Milford I. Patsel (re. damage to front sidewalk and front lawn allegedly caused by excessive tree roots) 97-194 Calling for Sealed Proposals for New Carpeting for the Dorothy Rohnert Spreckels Performing Arts Center, D. Approving letter request from "Project Graduation Committee for Rancho Cotate High School for graduation :event, June 12, 1998,. to waive fee for .use of the Sports Center Action 7:.45 p.m. 8. 'Other resolutions for consideration: 97-_ Supporting the "Taxpayers Fed Up With More State Bureaucracy" Coalition 97-_ Authorizing and Ratifying Classification and Salary for City. Positions (Department of Recreation) Info 7:55 p.m. 9. Rohnert Park Chamber of Commerce -Update on progress of efforts *By Dennis Patterson,rsiderit, .Board of Directors . Cha�ti�orr✓� ' Rohnert Park City Council Agenda - October 28, 1997 Action 8:10 p.m. 10. Mobile Home Park Rent Appeals Board Appointment *To fill vacancy from Jenny Huff resignation (LS nomination) Info 8:15 p.m.. 11. Presentation by Director of Public Safety re. Department Training Info 8:30 p.m. 12. Community Summit •Councilmember comments & reflections •Follow-up Plan eSissa letter Action 8:45;0m.- 13. Parks and Recreation -matter re. Skate Park Proposal . 1) Staff report 2) Council discussion/direction _ Action 8:55.p.m..14. Board of Permit Appeals - Review of Proposed Ordinance 1) Staff report/update 2) Council discussion/direction _Info 9.00 p.m. 15. _General'Plan matter re.-Existing.Environmental Conditions -'Dyett & Bhatia *Council comments Info. 9:05 p.m. 16. Council Committee and/or Other Reports, if any Info 9:10 p.m. 17. Transportation matters:. .1) Sonoma County Transportation Authority (SCTA) meeting of Oct. 20, 1997 .2) ..Calthorpe Study- Workshop - Choose date? 3) ' Other, , if any 9:15 p.m. 18. Communications Info 9:20 p:m 'HI19. Matters-from/for Council: 1) RPAS Web Site (Mackenzie) 2) League of Calif. Cities/Northbay Division - Two Executive Board Appoint- ments made by Mayors' & Councilmembers' Assoc. - Council Member interest — – 3) Memorial Brick Dedication, 12:00 noon, -Sat., Nov. 1, 1997 - Roberts Lake Park 4) ABAG General Assembly - Fri., Nov. 21, 1997, St.Francis Hotel," San Francisco .5) Miscellaneous, if any. (3 ) Rohnert Park Citv Council Agenda - October 28, 1997 9:30 p.m. 20. City Manager's report: Info - - - - - - - - - - - - 1) 'At -Grade railroad crossings - update Info ------------ 2) Creekside Annexation - update - Scheduled for LAFCO Agenda 11/6/97 Action ----------- 3) City Council/Staffmixer - "1940's Radio Hour", Performing Arts Center. Choose date: Nov. 28-30 (Fri. -Sun.), Dec. 4-7(Thurs.-Sun) 4) Miscellaneous; if any ' 9:40 p.m. 21. City Attorney's report: Info ------------ 1) Any items from closed: session .Action ----------- 2) Possible approval .of Resolution- No. .97- Establishing the Employment and Compensation -Agreement for the City Manager Info --------- - - 3) Political Activities of Non -Profit Recipients of Public Funds •Attorney General's letter City Attorney's analysis & response 4) .Other, if any __Rohnert Park District matters Other unscheduled public appearances (limited to 5 minutes per appearance :. with an unrestricted total time limit) .Adjournment no later than 10:00 p.m. to: 6:00 p.m.; Tues., Nov. 4, 1997 at the Senior Center, 6800 Hunter. Drive for Joint Meeting with Planning Commission re. Project Alternatives to be adjourned to: 6:00 p.m., Mon.,..Nov. 10, 1997 at -the City Council Chamber, 6750 Commerce Blvd. (to change regular Council meeting date signified on 11/11/97.) 9:45 p.m. COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK 'AGENDA. Tuesday, October 28, 1997 1. Call to Order, Roll Call (Flores - Mackenzie . Reilly_Vidak-Martinez_Spiro_) 2. Approval of Minutes - October 14, 1997 3. Approval of Bills 4. Acceptance of Cash/Investments Report for Month End, August 31, 1997 5. Acknowledging the Secretary's report on the posting of the agenda 6. Unscheduled public appearances - for public comment on agenda items or other matters 7. RESOLUTION FOR ADOPTION: . . 97-05 Approving a Budget -for Fiscal Year 1997-98 8. Miscellaneous staff reports 9. Matters from Commission Members 10. Adjournment of CDC meeting jh/agm&:102897ag (4) NOTICE OF STATUTORY AUTHORITY FOR HOLDING A CLOSED MEETING of the CITY COUNCIL of the CITY OF ROHNERT PARK October 28, 1997 LOCATION: :City Manager's Office at City Hall; 6750 Commerce Blvd, Rohnert-Park, Ca. TIME: 6:00 p.m. Pursuant to California Government Code Section 54950 et. seq., the City Council will.hold a closed session. More specific information regarding this meeting is provided as follows: *Litigation matters (G:C. 54956.9) 1. City of Rohnert Park vs. Golis 2. City of Rohnert Park - Fire Services - Validation Action -3. Mancilla/1-iggins vs. City of Rohnert Park •Personnel matters (G.C. 54957) 1. ,Sub -Committee Report - City Manager's Agreement 2. Negotiations Update 3. --Recruitment Update . Attachment to: City of Rohnert Park City Council Agenda Oct. 28, 1997 — - jh/agwda:102997 ag MEMO FO-L-t-j" F�"W:�'.V'd. •. ��1111 COUNCIL MEETING MEMO TO: The Honorable Mayor and Members FROM: Joseph D. Netter, of the City Council City Manager c: John Flitner, City Attorney Department Heads Administrative Staff Press Correspondents DATE: October 24, 1997 The following matters are among those scheduled for consideration or discussion at the Tuesday, October 28, 1997 City Council meeting: 5:00 P.M. WORK SESSION - PUBLIC HEARING Santa Rosa Subregional Long Term Wastewater System Alternatives The City Council requested this public hearing and report by Ed Brauner, Assistant City Manager from the City of Santa Rosa. Mr. Brauner will update the Council on various options being discussed by the City of Santa Rosa and the Santa Rosa Board of Public Utilities. Following the public hearing, it is the intent of the Council to hopefully select an alternative best suited to the needs of the City of Rohnert Park and its citizens. This information will be forwarded to the City of Santa Rosa's Board of Public Utilities and the Santa Rosa City Council. 1. Closed Session - A closed session has been scheduled at 6:00 p.m. and is held prior to the regular meeting at the' City Offices, 6750 Commerce Blvd., in the City Manager's office. This session has been scheduled to update the Council on certain litigation matters (G.C. 54956.9) and personnel matters (G.C. 54957), as listed on the agenda attachment. The closed session is to solicit Council's direction and input regarding these matters. 2. Approval of Minutes - The minutes of October 14, 1997 have been distributed to the Council for its review and formal approval. 3. Approval of Bills - A listing of all the bills being presented for approval has been provided to each Councilmember. If any Councilmember has any questions. concerning any items on the bills for approval, please so indicate at the meeting. 4. Adding information items - Any Councilmember desiring to add items of an informational nature, or items to be agendized at.a future meeting, may indicate the number of items and the topic of each item. Council Meeting Memo October 24, 1997 5. Youth Representatives to the City Council - Representative from the Senior Class, Adam Romero, and Junior Class representative Jessica Batacao will present items of interest and/or concern to the youths of our community. 6. -Unscheduled Public Appearances - Time has been allotted on the Council agenda for public comment on agenda items or other matters not on the agenda. There is a 30 minute time limit for unscheduled appearances and, depending on the number of speakers, each speaker may be limited. to a 3-5 minute time allotment. Any speakers not having time to speak during the unscheduled public appearances will be deferred to a time allotment at the end of the agenda for additional public comments. 7. C O N S E N T C A L E N D A R- For this meeting, the Consent Calendar consists of acknowledgment of the City Manager/Clerk's report on the posting of the meeting's agenda; acceptance of the Cash/Investments Report for Month End, August 31, 1997; the adoption of Resolutions Nos. 97-188 through 97-149; and the approval of a waiver of fees for use of the Sports Center for the Project Graduation event on June 12, 1998. Copies of all resolutions, staff reports and additional backup materials for those items listed have been provided to the Council for review prior to the meeting. . A. Agenda Posting - Agendas for the City Council meeting have been posted in locations accessible to the public; to wit: City Offices, Public Safety Building Main Station on City Hall Drive, and the Community Center Building ... all postings being done more than 72 hours prior to the meeting. B. Accepting the Cash/Investments Report for Month End August 31, 1997 - SElf- explanatory. C. Resolutions for Adoption: 97-188 supports Saturday,' November 15, 1997 as "America Recycles Day." The City of Rohnert Park has been a great supporter of protecting the world's natural resources. One way to meet this goal is to continue aggressive recycling programs. It is the intent for the City to inform all citizens of the positive affects of recycling and to encourage residents to. put into practice recycling efforts for the future of our world and planet. The Council designates November 15, 1997 as "America Recycles Day" and encourages citizens to continue aggressive efforts in recycling for the benefit of society and future generations. 2 Council Meeting Memo October 24, 1997 97-189 supports Thursday, November 20, 1997, as The American Cancer Society's "Great American Smokeout." The City of Rohnert Park is a smoke-free city and has encouraged tobacco prevention and .elimination over the past several _years. In a continuation of this effort, the City of Rohnert Park goes on record recognizing November 20, 1997 as the "Great American Smokeout." 97-190 approves a second amendment to the lease agreement with the Boys and Girls Club of Rohnert Park for rental space at 435 Southwest Blvd. As Council is aware, an agreement was entered into on October 13, 1992 with the Boys and Girls Club of Rohnert Park to lease approximately 1800 square feet in partnership with the Sonoma County Office of Education (SCOE) to lease 2,022 square feet in the former Public Safety offices at the 435 Southwest Blvd. Location. Approximately a year after that date, the SCOE released approximately 1100 square feet of space and turned it over to the Boys and Girls Club. Now the Sonoma County Office of Education (SCOE) has totally vacated the building at 435 Southwest Blvd., with the space being turned over to the Boys and Girls Club. Therefore, the entire space, with the exception of the fire bay, is now being used by the Boys and Girls Club of Rohnert Park. This Amendment No. 2 will correct the lease to include the entire space at the,,435 Southwest Blvd. Site (with the exception of the fire bay) to be leased by the Boys and Girls Club of Rohnert Park. The lease will remain at $2.00 per year with an increase in the monthly costs.for. utilities. The Boys and Girls Club is responsible for paying for telephone, utilities, and other charges associated with use of the facility. Alll other terms and conditions of the lease would remain the same. 97-191 approves a contract agreement with the County of Sonoma to render services for municipal elections. The County of Sonoma Clerk and Registrar of Voters Office handles the elections process for the City of Rohnert Park. The City has an existing agreement with the County's Registrar of Voters office, which is due to expire on December 31, 1997. A new contract has been providedextending the term of the contract for an additional five (5) years, as allowed by Government Code. The provisions of this contract are consistent with the prior - contract with a few minor changes. These minor changes include some stylistic changes and have also corrected Elections Code references to reflect the recodification/renumbering of the Elections Code that was used the last five (5) years. In addition, in the event the City chooses to terminate the contract pursuant to the last paragraph, the notice period has been extended from 60 to 90 days to accommodate the time frame involved in preparing for an election. The contract has been reviewed by staff and is recommended for approval. 97-192 rejects the claim of Ayling Wu c/o Law Offices of John L. Burris and Victor Hwang of the Asian Law Caucus for the alleged wrongful death of Kwanchung Kao. This case 3 Council Meeting Memo October 24, 1997 has been forwarded to the Redwood Empire Municipal Insurance Fund (REMIT), the City's insurance carrier, for appropriate handling and follow up. 97-193 rejects the claim of Milford I. Patsel regarding damages to his front sidewal and front lawn allegedly caused by excessive tree roots. This claim has been referred to the Redwood Empire Municipal Insurance Fund (REMIF) for handling and follow up. 97-194 calls for sealed proposals for new carpeting for the Dorothy Rohnert Spreckels Performing Arts Center. The budget allows for funds for recarpeting the lobby, events room, and main hall of the Performing Arts Center. The bid specs have been written with various options, including (1) Broadloom /Rolled Commercial Carpet; (2) Commercial Carpet Tiles - used in malls, hospitals, in the City's Community Center, Sports Center, Public Safety, Public Works and Finance Departments; and (3) Creative Bid - theater quality. Sealed proposals are to be forwarded to the City no later than November 24, 1997, with Council's consideration at its meeting of December 9, 1997. D. Approval of letter request from the Project Graduation Committee for Rancho Cotate High School Graduation Event June 12, 1998 for a waiver of fees for use of the Sports Center - The City has previously waived fees for this event over the past several years and, again, would be authorizing the waiver of fees for 1998. Project Graduation has been a tremendous success and the Council has strongly approved and endorsed its continuation. The cost associated with this waiver is approximately $500. ****************************************************************************** 8. Other resolutions for consideration: 1. Taxpayers Initiative - A resolution has been presented supporting the "Taxpayers Fed Up With More State Bureaucracy" Coalition. The League of California Cities has joined with dozens of other local governments in a fight to defeat this competition -killer initiative. The core issue with the competition -killer initiative is a simple one, should virtually all design and engineering projects developed for work by local government be accomplished by State employees instead of contractors hired and managed by local City Councils. It is felt by many jurisdictions the initiative would create major potential dealys of projects, affect local jobs and economies, and increase the State Controller's costs by over $1 million. It is strongly recommended by the League of California Cities that this initiative be opposed. Therefore, the City of Rohnert Park opposes the so-called "government cost savings taxpayers protection amendment," that is currently being circulated. It is also recommended that the City of Rohnert Park support the efforts of the growing coalition of "Taxpayers Fed Up With More State Bureaucracy" efforts. 4 o Council Meeting Memo October 24, 1997 2. Ratifying Certain Classification and Salary Ranges for City Positions in the Department of Recreation and Public Safety Director - The City Council had previously discussed certain recommended rate changes for certain positions, including the Director of Public Safety and certain other positions in the Recreation Department. For the Director of Public Safety, it was recommended and approved by the Council to adjust the salary by five percent (5%) to comply with the Classification Study completed by consultants Hayhurst & Associates. For the Recreation Department positions, the Hayhurst study was completed and follow up with an additional consultant by the name of Sally Brian. Sally Brian recommended certain Recreation positions be adjusted at certain ranges. This was forwarded on to the City Council with a staff recommendation for its review and approval. During discussions the Council, on a case-by-case basis, modified the staff recommendation and recommended slightly higher classifications for the Senior Programs Assistant, Recreation Specialist/Senior Programs, and Recreation Specialist/Sports Programs. The Recreation Supervisors rate was recommended to stay the same as recommended by staff. The Council's justification for the changes in the Senior Programs Assistant and Recreation Specialist classifications was that they would like to pay slightly higher than the mean for these positions. This was done on a case-by-case basis and was not to be construed as a practice that would follow for other classifications throughout the City. A resolution has been presented ratifying the appropriate changes as authorized_ by the City Council. 9. Rohnert Park Chamber of Commerce Preliminary Six Week Progress Report - Representatives from the Chamber of Commerce will be present to give the Council an update on the four (4) contract elements and task forces headed by the Chamber Board of Directors. Joe Dietzel is the Economic Development Chair who will oversee the Task Forces. The Task Forces are: Business Retention, Business Development, Shop in Rohnert Park Campaign, Recreation Destination, as well as other marketing promotional plans. The Chamber representatives will discuss the V.I.P. Ambassador Team, which is composed of high level executives from high tech companies, Sonoma State University, Cotati- Rohnert Park Unified School District, the Mayor and City Manager, as well as the Chamber Board of Directors. The purpose of the team is to be an official welcoming team for business executives from prospective companies to consider Rohnert Park as a location. Other information that is provided discusses the chamber's new web page and other promotional activities. 5 I Council Meeting Memo October 24, 1997 10. Mobile Home Parks Rent Appeals Board Appointment - Mayor Linda Spiro's nomination to the Rent Appeals Board has not been filled as -of this date. We have recently received a Fact Sheet from Onna S. Rayos, a resident of Rohnert Park, who is interested in this position. Time has been allotted on the agenda for the appropriate nomination and appointment if the Mayor so desires. 11. Presentation by Director of Public Safety Re. Training -'Director of Public Safety, Patrick E. Rooney, will be available for a 20 to 30 minute discussion with the Council on the Department of Public Safety's training programs. This will include police service (in-house) training, fire service (in-house) training, outside training programs, and, finally, educational opportunities and incentives. A complete outline of the presentation has been provided tothe Council for its review prior to the meeting. I look forward to hearing from Director Rooney on the advancements and procedures in training the Department's personnel. 12. Community Summit - Time has been allotted on the agenda for brief comments and reflections by Councilmembers regarding the Summit held October 16, 17, and 18, 1997. From staff's point of view, we felt the Summit was a tremendous success with high energy, inivolvement, .and a true commitment from members -of the Rohnert Park community. A separate initial Task Force Purpose Statement report has been provided as a summary of the major issues and vision statements from each Task Force developed at the Summit, including Transportation, Economic Vitality, Housing, Infrastructure, Town Center, Education, Boundary Issues, Youth, Tourism, and, finally, the Next Steps Task Force. Additional comments will be made on a follow-up plan, as several of the Task Forces have already commenced additional meetings. In addition, a draft letter has been submitted regarding Sissa's swine and pig operation. We are in hopes of capitalizing on the "Rohnert Pork" name and possibly creating a new "Swine and Wine Festival." 13. Parks and Recreation matter - Skate Park Proposal - The Parks and Recreation Commission recently held a public hearing regarding the possible locating of a skate park at Honeybee Park. A public hearing was held on Monday, October 20th, with approximately 40 residents in attendance. The Parks and Recreation Commission, following the public hearing, is recommending forming a committee to review the various concerns expressed by the residents on the development of a skate park at Honeybee Park next to the basketball courts. Director of Recreation Jim Pekkain will be at the City Council meeting to review the recommendations and to discuss the matter further with the Council. 6 Council Meeting Memo October 24, 1997 14. Board of Permit Appeals - Per the City Council's direction, staff has surveyed ail adjacent jurisdictions and the County of Sonoma to determine if other jurisdictions are using their Permit Appeals Board more than just as a Building Permit review body. The jurisdictions that have a combination building and fire codes board include the City of Santa Rosa, City of Sonoma, and the County of Sonoma. Originally, it was suggested that the Council consider developing not only a combined Building and Fire Appeals Board, but also a board to hear disabled access appeals. Based on the research and actual infrequency of the Disabled Appeals Board, it is now recommended that a combined Fire and Building Code Appeals Board be -established and a separate Countywide Disabled Access Appeals Board be formed. This can be handled on a regional basis, as the item is infrequently used and most representatives from all of the cities agree that a regional Disabled Access Appeals Board would be a great idea. Therefore, Lee Braun, Rohnert Park's Building Official, will take the lead in formulating a Countywide Disabled Access Appeals Board and work it out with the other cities and the County of Sonoma. In addition, City Attorney Flitner would complete an ordinance for introductiuon 'at . . the City Council's next meeting for a combination Appeals Board for both Building Code and Fire Code related items. If Council concurs with this recommendation, we- will move forward. Building Official Lee Braun will be present at Tuesday's meeting to answer any questions the Council may have. 15. General Plan Matter RE. Existing Environmental Conditions - Dyett & Bhatia Report - The Council has been provided with the Dyett & Bhatia Report which lists existing environmental conditions in the City of Rohnert Park. The report surveys the planning framework, community facilities, utilities and services, environmental resources and constrainst, land use and visual character, noise, and air quality. .Please note the Dyett & Bhatia report indicates a "study area" on a selected map. The study area corresponds to the direction given by the City Council and Planning Commission. The study area is subject to change based on information provided by the City Council. This information is provided at this time for Council's review to keep it updated on progress being made on the General Plan. Any comments should be directed through the City Manager to the Assistant City Manager who can inform our consultants, Dyett & Bhatia, on comments, input, etc. 16. Transportation matters: 1. Sonoma County Transportation Authority (SCTA) meeting of .October 20, 1997 -Mayor Linda Spiro and City Engineer Joe Gaffney can comment on any salient items that were discussed or approved at the SCTA meeting. Council Meeting Memo October 24, 1997 2. Calthorpe Study - Possible Workshop - At the last City Council meeting, the Council endorsed the Calthorpe Transportation Plan for Sonoma County, with additional comments being directed by the Mayor at the October 20th SCTA meeting. At that meeting, Mayor Linda Spiro indicated additional time is availalbe for further comment. She requested this item be re-agendized with the possibility of a future workshop on the Calthorpe Study. Therefore, this item has been re-agendized for the possibility of setting a date and time "for a more in-depth study or workshop on the Calthorpe Study. An additional copy of the Calthorpe Study's final report has been submitted to the Council for its review. 17. Communications - Copies of all meaningful communications have been provided to the Council for review prior to the meeting. A communications outline listing all of the communications being brought to the Council's attention will be provided. If there is any communication that any Councilmember wants to read or discuss, please so indicate during the review of communications. Other matters listed on the agenda are either covered in separate memos and reports or will be discussed and explained at the meeting. JDN:lr 8 -- CITY OF ROHNERT PARK 6750 Commerce Boulevard Rohnert Park, California 94928 Telephone (707)793-7227 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Council Correspondence Copy toes. Councilman Copy to Copy to Copy to NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Rohnert Park will be holding a PUBLIC HEARING. WHERE: Council Chambers at the City Offices 6750 Commerce Boulevard Rohnert Park, California WHEN: Tuesday, October 28, -19 97 , at the hour of 5:00 p.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter is reached. PURPOSE: For a Worksession to review the Santa Rosa Subregional Long Term Wastewater System Alternatives All persons interested in this matter should appear at the October 28, 1997 City Council meeting. Written statements may be submitted in advance for presentation to the Council as part of the public hearing. Questions regarding this matter should be directed to: City Engineer Joseph Gaffney (707)793-7239, or City Manager Joseph D. Netter (707)793-7226. Joseph D. Netter City Manager Dated: October 15. 1997 jh/c:win\wgwater POST: City Hall - Department of Public Safety - Recreation Department FAXED TO: Community Voice' Attn: Jean Cooney, Legals - 935-8304 & Jud Snyder, Editor - 584-2233 By: Judy Ha ,.Deputy City Clerk ICIZ9197 A -o Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project Alternative 2 _-South County Reclamation The South County Reclamation Alternative focuses on the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation in areas south and east of Santa Rosa. The projected reclaimed water flow from the Laguna Plant will be 21 mad average dry weather flow, and the design discharge rate to the Russian River will be 1% of river flow; however, a discharge rate of between 1% and 20% of river flow may also be considered under this Alternative. Discharge will occur at existing discharge locations (Delta and Meadowlane Ponds). Within Alternative 2, four subalternatives have been defined. These subalternatives differ principally in the location of the proposed storage facilities for reclaimed water to be used in agricultural irrigation. The subalternatives with their associated storage facilities are: Subaltemative 2A - Reservoir Site: Tolay Extended; Subalternative 2B - Reservoir Sites: Adobe Road and Lakeville Hillside; Subaltemative 2C - Reservoir Site: Tolay Confined; and Subalternative 2D - Reservoir Sites: Sears Point and Lakeville Hillside. Principal Project components which are common to all four subalternatives are: Expansion of the influent pumping capacity at the Laguna Plant; Urban irrigation projects in the Fountaingrove and Bennett Valley areas; A transport system, consisting of transmission pipelines and pump stations, to carry the reclaimed water to storage and irrigation sites; and Potential agricultural irrigation areas west of Sebastopol, east of Rohnert Park, in the Adobe Road and Lakeville areas, north of Petaluma, and in the bay flats west of Lakeville Highway. The combination of components for each of the four sub alternatives is shown in the table on the following page. Selection Workbook 13 - &MV,,'Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project \J J� 101 Sebastopol Agriculture y Fountain Grove and Bennett Valley Urban Irrigation . \� ANA OSA 12 Laguna Discharge p Subregional Wastewater Treatment Plant BASTOPOL—f eo°00s 16 Agriculture East of Rohnert Park 101 1 �R. RT Adobe RoadAgriculture 1 P T A Adobe Road Reservoir ora q0 O J I 1 101 1 B A North Petaluma Valley Agriculture J 121 Lakeville Agriculture m l Toley Reservoirs 101 -� C Lakeville Hillside Reservoir Sears Point Reservoir _ 37� Bayflats Agriculture Alternative 2 — South County Reclamation Selection Workbook 15 �"" Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project The West County Reclamation Alternative focuses on the use of reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation in areas west of the Laguna de Santa Rosa. The projected reclaimed water flow from the Laguna Plant will be 21 mad average dry weather flow, and the design discharge rate to the Russian River will be I% of the river flow; however, a discharge rate of between 1% and 20% of river flow may .also be considered. Discharge of reclaimed water will occur at existing discharae locations. Within Alternative 3, five subalternatives have been defined. The subalternatives with their associated storage facilities are: • Subaltemative 3A - Reservoir Site: Two Rock; • Subaltemative 3B - Reservoir Site: Bloomfield; • Subalternative 3C - Reservoir Site: Carroll Road; • Subalternative 3D - Reservoir Site: Valley Ford; and • Subaltemative 3E - Reservoir Site: Huntley. Principal Project components which.are common to all five subalternatives are: • Expansion of the influent pumping capacity at the Laguna Plant; • Urban irrigation projects in the Fountaingrove and Bennett Valley areas; • A transport system, consisting of pipelines and pump stations, to carry the reclaimed water to storage and irrigation sites; and • Potential agricultural irrigation areas west of Sebastopol and in the Stemple and Americano Creek areas. The combination of components for each of the five subalternatives is shown in the table on the following page. Selection Workbook. 49 i ' 'a v - Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project Alternative 3 —.West County Reclamation Selection Workbook r i �I Fountain Grove and 2 Bennett Valley Urban Irrigation Sebastopol Agriculture; ROSA 1 SANTA Mcp VIN a 101 Bloomfleld Reservoir S BAS)TOP L - Legu a Oischerge Carroll Road Reservoir \, -- S bregi nal Wastewater Treatment Plant Valley Ford Reservoir 118 � Two Rock Reservoir Americano Creek Agriculture ROHNERT------- PARK America = — —_ TATI - H ntley esery it ca , Stamp- - 101 PET Pacific — Ocean Stemple Creek Agriculture Alternative 3 —.West County Reclamation Selection Workbook Subregionai Long -Term Wastewater Project Alternative 4 Geysers Recharge-, The Geysers Recharge Alternative provides for transmission of reclaimed water from Delta Pond, located south of Guerneville Road to the geysers, located northeast of Healdsburg, for injection and recharge of the geysers steamfield currently used as a source for geothermal energy. The projected reclaimed water flow from the Laguna Plant will be 21 mgd average dry weather flow, and approximately 75% of the total reclaimed water will be used for recharge at the geysers. The remaining 25% will be used for irrigation. This Alternative will involve discharge to the Laguna de Santa Rosa only during peak wet weather events at a maximum rate that will not exceed I % of Russian River Flow, and no additional storage or irrigation is proposed. Expansion of the influent pumping capacity at the Laguna Plant is also a component of Alternative.4. Under this Alternative a reduction of up to 1,900 acres in existing agricultural irrigation acreage may be required and would be accomplished through attrition under current procedures for the Reclamation System. Non -renewal of irrigation contracts now occurs within the system and under this Alternative, the City of Santa Rosa will not replace contracts which are not renewed, rather than seeking to obtain new contracts. Components included in Alternative 4 are: • To deliver reclaimed water to the Geysers Steamfield area under Alternative 4, a series of four high pressure pump stations is required to transport the water about 35 miles from Delta Pond to the Steamfield. The four pump stations would act to lift the water in steps up the mountain. From the source pump station at the Delta Pond, the pipeline would discharge water into a tank at each successive pump station. The.tank would serve as a supply to that station for the next lift. The tanks would be 500,000 -gallon capacity, about 60 feet in diameter and 24 feet high. • The proposed Geysers Steamfield component includes the following elements. — Two 500,000 -gallon storage tanks at the end of the transmission pipeline, to serve as a reservoir for gravity distribution to the injection wells. The tanks would be above grade, each about 60 feet in diameter and 24 feet high. — Distribution pipelines, 12 to 36 inches in diameter, and primarily mounted above ground on pipe supports, would convey water from the two storage tanks to the Geysers injection wells. — Ten to fifteen water injection wells distributed around the central and northwest portion of the Geysers geothermal fields. These are existing steam extraction wells which would be converted to water injection wells. Selection Workbook 87 �a— Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project Geysers Recharge Area 1 PS=G4 Qg'a PS -G3 w` Q` PS -G2 Pipeline to Geysers 101 SANTA ROSA S- De/le Pond i A rY °N��`j°y BASTOPO,L" II Subregional Wastewater soda0 j Treatment Plant 16 - ROHNERT PARK Alternative 4 - Geysers Recharge 88 Selection Workbook Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project This Alternative provides for the discharge of reclaimed water to the Russian River at a design discharge rate of up to 20 % of river flow. Under Alternative 5, the projected reclaimed water flow from the Laguna Plant will be 21 mgd average dry weather flow, and no additional reuse or storage of reclaimed water will be required. Within Alternative 5, two subalternatives have been defined. These subalternatives differ principally in the location at which discharge to the Russian River will take place. The subalternatives are: • Subalternative 5A - Transmission of reclaimed water and discharge to the Russian River at a location above the Sonoma County Water Authority intakes; • Subalternative 5B - Discharge of reclaimed water to the Laguna de Santa Rosa at the existing discharge locations. Under the 20% design discharge rate for Subalternative 5A, minor amounts of reclaimed water may also be discharged to the Laguna at the existing discharge locations. Also included in Alternative 5 is expansion of the influent pumping capacity at the Laguna Plant. • Components included in Alternative 5A are: • A new pump station at Delta Pond • An existing 27 -inch pipeline from Delta Pond and a new 48 -inch pipeline parallel to the existing line from a with the flow split between these two pipes. Prior to entry to the North Booster pump station, the two pipes would merge into a 54 - inch line leading to the discharge location. • A new outfall structure located on the east bank of the Russian River, approximately two miles upstream of the Sonoma County Water Authority water supply intakes. • For Alternative 5B, no new construction would be required. Existing facilities to be utilized include the two outlets to Santa Rosa Creek at Delta Pond, a 48 -inch diameter outlet and a 36 -inch diameter outlet. Two additional outlets to the Laguna de Santa Rosa exist at Meadow Lane Pond, a 36 -inch diameter outlet and a 24 -inch diameter outlet. Selection Workbook 97 Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project Alternative 5 — Discharge 98 Selection Workbook J r.� $ubregianal Long -Term Wastewater Project IiNTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY TO THE DRAFT ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT/ ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT STATEMENT City of Santa Rosa and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cooperating Agencies: Bureau of Land Management National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration July 1996 Lo. p -Tor... We ------- P_ je DRAFT EIR / E I S I INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY -• t 1.1 Purpose and Need................................................................................................................1-1 1.2 Environmental Regulation ............................................. :........................................................ 1-5 1.3 Availability of the Draft EIR/EIS and the Public Comment Period...............................................1-9 1.4 Project Background.............................................................................................................1-11 Table 1-4 1.5 Public Involvement ........ .................................. ................ ................. .................................. .1-14 Table 1-5 1.6 Description of Existing System and Alternatives....................................................................1-18 1.7 Areas of Controversy and Index of Key Issues to Be Resolved................................................1-28 Alternative 3......................................................................................................................1-20 1.8 Mitigation and Monitoring Program.......................................................................................1-30 Alternative 4......................................................................................................................1-21 1.9 Environmental Impacts and Mitigation........................:.........................................................1-31 Alternative 5......................................................................................................................1-22 1.10 NEPA/CEQA Required Sections............................................................................................1-58 1.11 Range of Discharge Evaluation............................................................................................1-61 LIST OF TABLES Table1-1 Design Discharge...............................................................................................................1-13 Figure 1-2 Table1-2 Cost Estimates...................................................................................................................1-26 Agency Flow Chart ................................................. :.............................................................. Table 1-3 Key Issues to Be Resolved...................................................:..............................................1-28 EIR/EIS Timeline..................................................................................................................1-8 Table 1-4 Loss of Farm and Grazing Land at Reservoir Sites................................................................1-31 Project Area.......................................................................................................................1-18 Table 1-5 Loss of Native Plant Communities at Reservoir Sites............................................................1-36 Alternative 2......................................................................................................................1-19 Table 1-6 Loss of Wetlands at Reservoir Sites....................................................................................1-38 Alternative 3......................................................................................................................1-20 Table 1-7 Roadway Miles Affected by Pipeline Construction..................................................................1-38 Alternative 4......................................................................................................................1-21 Table 1-8 Known Cultural Resources Impacted....................................................................................1-40 Alternative 5......................................................................................................................1-22 Table 1-9 Estimate of Maximum Additional Service Charge..................................................................1-41 Table 1-10 Estimate of Additional Demand Fee.....................................................................................1-41 Table 1-11 Annual Gross Production Value of Irrigated Crops..................................................................1-42 Table 1-12 Annual Net Economic Impacts.............................................................................................1-42 Table 1-13 Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation Measures.....................................................1-44 Table 1-14 Growth -inducing Factors......................................................................................................1-58 Table 1-15 Volume of Reclaimed Water Discharge.................................................................................1-62 LOST OF FIGURES Figure 1-1 The Subregional Wastewater Reclamation System...................................................................1-1 Figure 1-2 Schematic of Reclaimed Water Disposal ............ .................................................................... 1-2 Figure1-3 Agency Flow Chart ................................................. :.............................................................. 1-7 Figure1-4 EIR/EIS Timeline..................................................................................................................1-8 Figure1-5 Project Area.......................................................................................................................1-18 Figure1-6 Alternative 2......................................................................................................................1-19 Figure1-7 Alternative 3......................................................................................................................1-20 Figure1-8 Alternative 4......................................................................................................................1-21 Figure1-9 Alternative 5......................................................................................................................1-22 JULY 31, 1996 1 i i � � � S brcgior�al Lo..g-Ter... Waece..acer Proj— DRAFT EIR/EIS I INTROMMAICTION AND SUMMARY The project proponent, the City of Santa Rosa (managing partner of the Santa Rosa Subregional Wastewater Reclamation System), proposes to implement a Long - Term Wastewater .Project. Prior to this action, the City of Santa Rosa must identify and document :the potential - environmental impacts of the project in accordance with the California Environ- mental Quality Act and the National Environmental Policy Act. The Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environ- mental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS) has been prepared by a team of environmen- tal consultants managed by Harland Bartholomew & Associates (HBA) under the direction of the City of Santa Rosa and the U.S. Anny Corps of Engineers (Corps). 1.1 PURPOSE AND NEED The City of Santa Rosa has adopted the following statement of Purpose and Need for the project. Need for the Project The North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board requires that, by 1999, the Santa Rosa Subregional Wastewater Reclamation System (Sub - regional System) must put in place a reclaimed water disposal solution that meets the Board's reliability require- ments and existing and future capacity needs, no matter what weather conditions occur. The Santa Rosa Subregional Long - Te rm ong-Term Wastewater Project (the Project) is intended to meet,tliis requirement. The volume of water the Project must - -accommodate is based upon a number of factors 'including the buildout of the JULY 31, 1996 This Introduction and Sunnnary serves both as a stand-alone sun ntary and as Chapter 1 of the Draft EIRIEI S for the Santa Rosa Subregional Long -Term [Tastewater project. Although this Introduction and Srunmary is'rnade available separatelt) front the main document, in no ivav does it substititte for the Draft FIRIEIS which addresses each issue in much Greater detail. Copies of the Draft. EIR/ELS are avail - able for review or purchase; please see page 1-9 for spe ci fic information. Figure 1-1. The Subregional Wastewater Reclamation Systern consists of five member agencies. 1-1 i. ' ` Y rl yc 101:Co o oe»a cy �. Santa Rosa � y ParK SD Sebastopol 12 O`y Rohnert "t ParK 7'k 374r"C. OCotati C 1 Comity Not to soma 1-1 r.� Figure 1-2. Primary disposal methods for reclaimed water are agricultural irrigation and discharge to the Laguna de Santa Rosa during the discharge season. Agricuiturai Irrigation' n t; General Plans (current as of April, 1994) of the Subregional members through approximately the year 2010. The Project includes expansion of head - works capacity (capability for -pumping sewage from the plant intakes to the treatment facilities) at the Laguna Plant as well as disposal of reclaimed water. Current Wastewater Management System The Laguna Plant is part of the Subregional System and provides tertiary treatment of wastewater collected from the cities of Santa Rosa, Rohnert Park, Cotati, and Sebastopol, and from the South Park County Sanitation District (Subregional members) (see Figure 1-1). The Laguna Plant also treats septic waste from most of Sonoma County. The Laguna Plant is currently permitted by the Regional Water Quality Control Board to treat 18 million gallons per day (average dry weather flow). The Subregional System currently uses a combination of reuse and discharge for disposal of the reclaimed water (see Figure 1-2). A distribution system carries reclaimed water from the Laguna Plant Discharge Storage 6 Treatment Plant to be used for golf course irrigation, urban landscape irrigation, and agricultural irrigation on about .5,500 acres of land located primarily ui the Santa Rosa Plain. A portion of the reclaimed water is also used for the management of a small created wetland area; a second wetland area is under constriction. The Subre- gional System is supported by storage facilities .which hold approximately 1,500 million gallons (MG) of reclaimed water Until it can be reused or discharged. During the October 1—May 14 discharge season, reclaimed water from the Laguna Plant that is not used for irriga- tion is discharged to the Laguna de Santa Rosa and Santa Rosa Creek, which flow into the Russian River approximately 10 miles north of the Laguna Plant. The Problem The existing facilities of the Subregional System are not capable of reliably disposing of current reclaimed water flows in accordance with its Regional Water Quality Control Board permit under all weather conditions. Ordinarily, the permitted discharge is limited to a maximum of one percent of Russian River flow. With the permission of the Regional Water Quality Control Board, discharge can temporarily increase to five percent. Storage is provided to hold reclaimed water so that the maximum permitted discharge is normally not exceeded. However, due to a combination of weather conditions which may occur during the discharge season, discharge to the Russian River currently has the potential to exceed the permitted maxi- mum, which, in fact, did occur in 1985 and 1986. These conditions, although 1-2 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY s i infrequent, occur during winters charac- terized by periodic light rain, but overall drier-than-nonnal conditions when river flow remains low. As a result, the Subregional -System could be forced to discharge at rates higher than allowable under these conditions, leaving the System without a reliable, legally sanctioned, disposal option. The Project is intended to provide for reliable disposal of existing reclaimed water flows and the increased volume expected at buildout of the General Plans (in effect at the outset of this analysis in April, 1994) of the con -muni - ties making up the Subregional System approximately through the year 2010. With implementation of current water conservation programs, reclaimed water flows through the Laguna Plant are pro- jected to increase to about 21 million gallons per day average dry weather flow at buildout. After reductions due to water conserva- tion, the annual average reclaimed water generation is projected to be about 8,220 MG. This would be an increase of 17 percent over the annual average flow in 1994 of 7,000 MG. The existing reliable capacity for disposal is actually much lower, at about 3,800 MG per year. Therefore, this Project must reliably dispose of 3,200 MG to accom- modate 1994 flows and 4,420 MG to meet existing demand plus General Plan buildout flows. The City currently requests an exception to its Russian River discharge permit almost every year, allowing a maximum of five percent River discharge instead of the standard permitted level of one percent. JULY 31, 1996 Wase<... ' P- j— D R AFT E I R/ El S Project Objectives The Santa Rosa Board of Public Utilities (BPU), as the governing body of the Subregional System, adopted the fol- lowing Project objectives on December 16, 1993. The Santa Rosa City Council reviewed these Project objectives on December 28, 1993, and the BPU reaffinned them on May 27, 1994. Overall Project objectives: • Provide wastewater treatment and disposal for the Santa Rosa Subregional Wastewater System to accommodate projected growth as indicated in the currently adopted General Plans of each of the Subregional entities; • Develop and operate the wastewater treatment and disposal system in ways that protect public health and safety and promote wise use of water resources. Supporting Project objectives: The supporting objectives are intended to further define the overall Project objectives and to provide guidance in the development and evaluation of Project alternatives. • Maximize reclamation, recycling, and reuse of advanced treated wastewater to the greatest extent feasible; • Reclaimed water that is not reused will be recycled or disposed of in a manner that protects beneficial uses of receiving waters; • Optimize water resource conservation where practical; • Operate the wastewater treatment plant and disposal system successfully _under all foreseeable weather conditions; • Satisfy applicable regulatory 'agency and institutional guidelines and requirements, • Develop a disposal system that is manageable and reliable; • Develop a program that can be successfully financed and is economically feasible. 1-.3 FA Purpose of the Project The Project objectives provide guidance for achieving the Project purpose: annual disposal of 8,220 MG of reclaimed water in a reliable, practicable manner that provides the best use of water resources, while protecting public health and the environment. Thus, the City's purpose for the Project is not only to dispose of reclaimed water, but to do so in a manner that maximizes reclamation, recycling, and reuse and optimizes water conservation. Although the need for the Project is driven by reclaimed water disposal requirements, Project elements that provide conservation, reuse, or recycling of water resources are neces- sary to serve the overall purpose and need of die Project. The City's purpose in maximizing water reclamation, recycling, and. reuse is consistent with the State of California's Water Recycling Act of 1991 (California Water Code, Division 7, Water Quality, Chapters 1-10; California Porter - Cologne Water Quality Act, sections 13576 and 13577). Thus, an important purpose of the Project is to benefit agri- culture, greenbelts, and recreation and to protect and enhance fisheries, wildlife habitat, and riparian areas through pro- vision of reclaimed water, an acknowl- edged valuable resource. The combined purposes of achieving reliable reclaimed water disposal while maximizing water reclamation and recycling and optimiz- ing conservation have determined the Project alternatives under consideration. 1-4 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.2 ENVIRONMENTAL REGULATION This is the introduction and summary of a Draft Environmental Impact Report/ Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS) on the Project. The Draft EIR/EIS serves as a joint document to meet environmental review require- ments of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). Because this document reflects both federal and state regulations, it is referred to as an EIR/EIS. National Environmental Policy Act The EIR/EIS serves as an Enviromnental Impact Statement (EIS) under NEPA for federal agencies that will need to issue permits. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is the federal lead agency wider NEPA because most of the alter- natives being considered require a Corps permit. As Cooperating Agencies, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will also use the document. NOAA is an agency with "special expertise" regarding the Project; it'will use the EIS to assess impacts to the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary and make a recommendation to the Corps regarding the City's Section 404 permit application. BLM has "jurisdiction by law" over portions of the Project and will use the EIS to consider environmental 'impacts which could result due to approval of Geothermal Sundry Permits and granting of Rights -of -Way for geothermal injection wells, pipelines, and roads. JULY 31, 1996 � bragior�al L__. -T__ W-- ­r Proja DRAFT EIR/EIS The EIS is prepared in accordance with NEPA and Council on Environmental Quality Regulations 40 CFR 1500 et seq. and Corps NEPA Implementation Procedures for tine Regulatory Program (33 CFR 325, Appendix B). The purpose of the EIS is to: • Assess all reasonable alternatives; • Provide.a full discussion of significant environmental impacts of the altema- tives; and • Inform the decision -makers and public of project alternatives that will avoid or minimize adverse impacts. or actually `enhance the quality of the environment. The Draft EIS considers five alternatives at an equal level of analysis. After impacts for the alternatives have been evaluated and disclosed in the Draft EIS, the applicant (City) will select a preferred Project. A Final EIS will then be prepared that will present the City's preferred alternative with the other alternatives. The Final EIS is for use by federal agen- cies, in conjunction with other relevant information, in their decision whether to approve or deny a permit for the alterna- tive selected by the City. California Environmental Quality Act The EIR/EIS also serves as an Environ- mental Impact Report (EIR) for state and local agencies that will need to issue permits. The City is the CEQA lead agency. The document is prepared in accordance with CEQA and the CEQA Guidelines (California Administrative 1-5 Code Section 15000 et seq.), An EIR, as described by the CEQA Guidelines, is a detailed statement prepared to describe and analyze significant effects of a project and discuss ways to avoid or mitigate the effects. Although the lead agency must consider the information in the EIR, the docu- ment's conclusions do not control the lead agency's authority to approve or disapprove a project. A lead agency may approve a project despite its significant adverse impacts if.that agency issues two sets of findings. The first set must specifically state how the lead agency has responded to the significant effects identified in the EIR. Secondly, the agency must prepare a "statement of overriding considerations" which sets forth the specific reasons the agency has approved the project despite significant environmental effects. After the City, as lead agency, has certified the EIR and issued the proper findings (if required), the City will select a preferred project. Other Participating Agencies Many other agencies have discretionary authority to approve part or all of the Project and will rely on the City and the Corps to produce an EIR/EIS adequate for their needs. In addition, the City and the Corps must confer with other uiter- ested public agencies which do not have approval authority over the Project, but which have specific expertise with regard to the Project or have responsibil- ity for resources affected by the Project. Figure 1-3 shows the relationship among various agencies. Figure 1-4 shows the timeline of the EIR/EIS. 1-6 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY Subreglonal System Member Entitles: • City of Santa Rosa • City ofRohnert Park • City of Cotati • City of Sebastopol • South Park County Sanitation District Agency Flow Chart Lead Agency—CEQA Responsible Agencies • Bay Area Air Quality Management District • Coastal Commission, North Coast Region • Department of Fish and Game • Department of Water Resources Division of Safety of Dams • North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board • Sonoma County Permit and Resource Management Department • Sonoma County Airport Land Use Commission • State Water Resources Control Board Division of Water Rights • State Lands Commission • State Historical Preservation Officer City of Santa Rosa Trustee Agencies Many state, regional, ,and local agencies responsible for resources affected by the Project. Lead Agency—NEPA U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Cooperating Federal Agencies • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration • U.S. Bureau of Land Management Federal Agencies with Jurlsdlction by Law • U.S. Bureau of Land Management • U.S. Environmental Protection Agency Federal Agencies with Special Expertise Many federal agencies responsible for resources affected by the Projector knowledgable about impacts of the Project. III W z 0 0 C A --1 0 Z D Z 0 U) C D a d t EIR/EIS Timeline 6/94 9/95 � 8/96 10/96 12/96 3/97 6/97 10/97 12/97 3/98 CEQA Circulate Prepare Certify Notice of Process Draft Final EIR EIR ; Determination Scoping Prepare Draft EIR for (City Of Santa Rosa) Comments 0 � � a z NEPA Circulate � � ' Prepare Final EIS ; o ; Record of z � Process Draft Prepare Corps Decision on J (U.S. Army Scoping ; Prepare Draft EIS for ; Section 404/10 ; a ; 404/10 a Corps of Comments Permit Application z Permit ° , Engineers) W I a o Project , � Prepare Z , a Timeline Preliminary En a (City of ' � '� � Design Desi n � m Santa Rosa) a 1.3 AVAILABILITY OF THE DRAFT EIRAIS ARID THE PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD The Draft EIR/EIS will be circulated for a miminum .of 60 days to allow public agencies and interested individuals to review and comment on the document. A joint public hearing on the Draft EIR/EIS will be held by the Board of Public Utilities, the City Council, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers in Santa Rosa on Tuesday, September 24, 1996. Written comments will be accepted by the City until 4:30 p.m. on Monday, October 7, 1996. Public agencies and interested individuals are encouraged to submit comments on the Draft EIR/EIS for consideration and inclusion in the Final EIR. By agreement of the NEPA and CEQA lead agencies, all written comments on the Draft EIR/EIS should be sent to: Marie Meredith City of Santa Rosa Community Development Department P.O. Box 1678 Santa Rosa, CA 95402-1678 (707)543-3181 Office hours: 8:30 a.m.—noon, 1:00-4:30 p.m., Monday—Friday. To facilitate a clear understanding of the comments, please provide a separate sentence or paragraph for each comment and note the page and chapter of the document to which the comment is directed. This approach to commenting JULY 31, 1996 on the document will help facilitate the response to comments and preparation of the Final EIR. Because the Draft EIR/EIS, including the appendices, is so lengthy, it has been published on CD ROM in addition to the normal printed hard copy. The document may be purchased in either printed form or CD ROM (Mac or PC formats) from the Department of Community Develop- ment at the previously listed address. The Draft EIR/EIS, appendices, and reference material are available for review at the Laguna Wastewater Treatment Plant Library. The Draft EIR/EIS and appendices will also be available for review at the libraries listed on the next page. Some libraries have the facilities to view the document on CD ROM. Libraries will have a printed copy of the document. The Central Branch of the Sonoma County Library in Santa Rosa has copies of federal and state legislation and regulatory codes referenced in this Draft EIR/EIS. Fina! Ella At the end of the public review period, written responses will be prepared for written comments received during the circulation period and comments made during .the public.hearing. The comments and responses will then be included in the. Final EIR and will be considered by the City prior to certifica- tion of the EIR. DR AFT E I R/ E IS 1-9 Locations for Reviewing Draft EIRAIS Printed copy, CD ROM, and references: Laguna Wastewater Treatment Plant 4300 Llano Road Santa.Rosa (707) 543-3350 Printed copy and CD ROM: Central Branch, Rulcon Valley Branch, Sonoma County Library Sonoma County Library Third and E Streets 6959 Montecito Blvd. Santa Rosa Santa Rosa Civic Center Branch, Ruben Salazar Library Marin County Library Sonoma State University 3501 Civic Center Dr. 1801 East Cotati Avenue San Rafael Rolinert Park Printed copy: U.S. Army Corps Novato Library of Engineers 1720 Novato Blvd. San Francisco District Novato Regulatory Branch 333 Market Street Occidental Library San Francisco 73 Main Street Occidental Forestville Library 107 First Street Petaluma Library Forestville 100 Fairground Drive Petaluma Guerneville Library 4107 Armstrong Woods Rd. Point Reyes Station Guerneville Library Point Reyes Station Healdsburg Library 139 Piper Rohnert Park- Healdsburg Cotati Library 6600 Hunter Drive Monte Rio Library Rohnert Park 20466 Highway 116 Monte Rio Sebastopol Library 7140 Bodega Avenue Northwest Branch, Sebastopol Sonoma County Library 150 Coddingtown Center Santa Rosa 1-10 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.4 PROJECT BACKGROUND The following is a chronology of signifi- cant events that have led to the current status. of the Subregional System and its need forthe Project. Prior to 1985: In the early 1970's, the City built one of the first water reclama- tion and reuse systems in the world. Reclaimed water was produced through secondary treatment, and the system started -with 1,500 acres of agricultural irrigation. During the 1970's and 1980's Santa Rosa and its Subregional member partners experienced rapid growth. This growth, combined with increasingly stringent regulations on wastewater and unusual weather conditions, made the system vulnerable to failure. February of 1985: A stone caused a sudden inflow into the collection system, resulting in spilling of about one million gallons of untreated sewage from a manhole near Llano Road prior to reaching the Laguna Plant. March 1985 and January 1986: Dry weather caused low -flow conditions in the Russian River, preventing release of reclaimed water and causing the.holding ponds to fill to capacity. Two planned mid coordinated, though illegal, releases of reclaimed water were conducted to reduce strain on the system. The releases exceeded the 1% of river .flow allowed in the City's permit. The 1985 release discharged reclaimed water up to 10% of the river flow; the 1986 release, up to 5% of river flow. Spring 1985: Responding to the 1985 spill and'planned discharge, the North 3 �S brogior�al Lo.,g-T®r.., W-- —, Pr ,eon DRAFT EIR/EIS Coast. Regional Water Quality Control Board fined the City $50,000 and issued a cease-and-desist order. The Board required the City to develop a long-term project that would prevent such releases in the future. Spring 1986: The Board adopted excep- tion criteria which allowed discharges of up to 5% of river flow during dry winters, but required continued expansion of the irrigation system to compensate for growth. Fall 1986: The City was challenged in court on the adequacy of the first EIR prepared on an ocean discharge project. Although the lawsuit was settled, the City ultimately decided not to use the EIR or the project it analyzed as a basis for implementing a solution. December 1988: The Laguna Plant expanded its capacity to 18 million gallons per day and was upgraded to an advanced treatment (tertiary) level. 1990: The Board of Public Utilities (BPU) directed the City staff to proceed with an EIR on a West County Recla- mation Alternative, which would expand the existing reuse system into western Sonoma County. 1991: An EIR/EIS was certified and the West County Reclamation project was selected. The City was sued on the adequacy of the document, and it was eventually held to be inadequate. 1992: The California Department of Health Services rescinded its guidelines for the discharge of tertiary -treated reclaimed water into drinking water JULY 31, 1996 1-11 sources, thus increasing the number of potential solutions to the reclaimed water disposal problem. 1993: Rather than correct the inadequa- cies the court found in its previous EIR/EIS, the City initiated a completely new planning and environmental evalua- tion process. That decision led to the current EIR/EIS and the subsequent decision to analyze a range of options and give equal consideration to each. coping Phase and Environrmental Study Phase The tasks associated with each step were: Step I -Scoping Phase • Delineation of the reclaimed water disposal problem; • Identification of potential alternatives and alternative components; • Screening and selection of alternatives to be evaluated in the Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS); • Determination of analysis to be conducted in the EIR/EIS, and • Public participation in each of the above tasks. Step II -Environmental Study Phase • Design and pre -engineering of the Project alternatives; • Preparation of related scientific and engineering studies; • Analyses of the potential environmental impacts based on these studies; • Public participation in preparation of the environmental analyses; and • Preparation of the Draft EIR/EIS. The BPU selected and contracted with Harland Bartholomew & Associates to prepare the EIR/EIS. The Current Project A new effort to find a solution to the long-term reclaimed water disposal problem began in early 1993. First, emphasis was placed on the Step I- Scopung Phase to identify and weigh all the solutions considered during previous processes plus any and all solutions sug- gested through an extensive public involvement program. All these poten- tial solutions or parts of solutions were evaluated and screened resulting in a final set of alternatives to be evaluated in the environmental process (refer to Chapter 3.3 in the Draft EIR/EIS). No preferred alternative was selected; all alternatives were evaluated equally. This extensive Scoping Phase took place over a two-year period. It was then followed by Step II -Environmental Study Phase, during which the environmental analysis of the alternatives was carried out. An extensive list of potential project alternatives and alternative components, representing a wide spectrum of possible solutions to the Subregional System's reclaimed water disposal problem, was developed by members of the public who participated in workshops at the onset of the Step I -Scoping Phase. The list of potential alternatives and alternative components was carefully reviewed to develop a list for evaluation and screening. The Santa Rosa Long -Tenn Wastewater Project Screening Report evaluated 32 alternatives according to criteria adopted 1-12 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY by the BPU and was completed and dis- tributed for review in March, 1994. The BPU selected six alternatives, includnlg the No Action (No Project) Alternative, to be carried forward in the preparation of the EIR/EIS. One alternative, the Community Separator option, was dropped by the BPU in April, 1995. The decision to select these alternatives and drop the Community Separator option from further consideration is discussed in the Draft EIR/EIS, Chapter 3.3, and in the Scoping Report. After further consideration of the alter- natives and comments from interested parties, on April 18, 1995, the Santa Rosa City Council confirmed that four primary alternatives, along with the No Action (No Project) Alternative, were to be considered equally for the purposes of die EIR/EIS. • Alternative 1: No Action (No Project). • Alternative 2: South County Recla- mation; agricultural irrigation and associated reclaimed water storage in areas south of Santa Rosa. • Alternative 3: West County Recla- mation; agricultural irrigation and associated reclaimed water storage in areas west of Santa Rosa. • Alternative 4: Geysers Recharge; injec- tion of reclaimed water for recharge of the Geysers steamfield located in northeastern Sonoma County. DRAFT EIR/EIS Design Discharge The phrase "design discharge" reflects the maximum monthly discharge rate during normal, operations expressed as a per- centage of the flow in the Russian River. For example, a five percent "design discharge" scenario indicates that the project was designed with facilities that would accommodate monthly average discharge to the Russian River at five percent or less of river flow in at least 19 out of 20 months. Average discharges would be well below the design discharge, as shown in the following table; • Alternative 5: Discharge; release of reclaimed water to the Russian River or Laguna de .Santa Rosa at a design discharge rate of up to 20 percent of river flow. (Refer to a more detailed description of alternatives in Section 1.6 of this Introduction and Summary or Section 3.4 (?I -the Draft EIR/EIS.) Table 1-1. Design Discharge JULY 31, 1996 1-13 Monthly Average Discharge Design Discharg® October 1—May 14 (as a Proportion (as a Proportion of River Flow) of -River Flow) 1 Percent Less than 0.5 Percent 5 Percent . I Percent 10 Percent 2 Percent 20 Percent 4 Percent • Alternative 5: Discharge; release of reclaimed water to the Russian River or Laguna de .Santa Rosa at a design discharge rate of up to 20 percent of river flow. (Refer to a more detailed description of alternatives in Section 1.6 of this Introduction and Summary or Section 3.4 (?I -the Draft EIR/EIS.) Table 1-1. Design Discharge JULY 31, 1996 1-13 1.5 PUBLIC INVOLVEMENT Both CEQA and NEPA emphasize the importance of public involvement in the environmental review process. NEPA directs federal agencies to "encourage and facilitate public involvement in decisions which affect the quality of the human environment" to the fullest extent possible (40 CFR 1500.2d). In another section of the regulations dealing with public involvement, NEPA requires federal agencies to "make dili- gent efforts to involve the public in preparing and implementing their NEPA. procedures" (40 CFR 1506.6a and Corps Procedures for Implementing NEPA 33 CFR 325, Appendix B). CEQA Guidelines, Section 15201, state that, "Public participation is an essential part of the CEQA process. Each public agency should include provisions in its CEQA procedures for wide public involvement, formal and informal, con- sistent with its existing activities and procedures, in order to receive and eval- uate public reactions to environmental issues..." The Guidelines (Section 15083) also encourage the Lead Agency for an El_R "to consult directly with any person or organization it believes will be Project Mailing List Since early 1993, a mailing list has been maintained incorpo- rating key interest groups and individuals who have expressed an iiterest it this project. The list also includes policymakers, public agencies, members of the media, and property owners whose property may potentially be impacted. The mailing list has grown to over 2,600 people. (Refer to Appendix C, Volume III of the Draft EIR/EIS.) concerned with the environmental effects of the project." In order to avoid more serious problems which could arise later in the environ- mental process, the Guidelines also advise that "many public agencies have found that early consultation solves many potenfial problems." The Guidelines note that "...this early con- sultation may be called scoping," and that scoping will be necessary when preparing an EIR. Planning Public Involvement During Step' -coping Phase Interested members of the public reviewed and commented on the Public Involvement Plan and on the Step I -Scoping Phase starting in mid-1993. The Plan outlined a lengthy process to involve the public in the identification, screening, and eventual selection of project alternatives and alternative Com- ponents to be analyzed in the EIR/EIS. Identification of Potential Alternatives and Alternative QDMP4onents Three rounds of workshops, held by the City, provided the principal means for public involvement during the Scoping Phase. Summary feedback reports on these meetings were provided to partici- pants and other members of the public several weeks after each round. In the first two rounds of workshops, held in September and November, 1993, partici- pants identified and then defined more specifically, alternatives and connpo- nents for inclusion in the screening process. Public input received as a result 1-14 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY of interviews with individuals and groups and from written correspondence from interested parties also helped to define the list of 79 candidate alterna- tives and components. These were in addition to the list of 75 alternatives iden- tified by the BPU prior to March, 1993. The list of potential alternatives and alternative components was then care- fully reviewed by the environmental consultant to develop a list. of alterna- tives for evaluation and screening. The two plain objectives in developing this shorter list of alternatives were: • To include all feasible components suggested by the public during the workshops in the Fall of 1993 in at least one alternative; and • To develop all reasonable alternatives that would meet CEQA and NEPA requirements for alternatives analysis in the, EIR/EIS. A preliminary list of 20 alternatives was published in December, 1993. This list was distributed to the public for review and comment to ensure that it adequately represented all alternative components nominated for consideration. It was then presented to the BPU in January, 1994. To allow time for further public com- ment, the BPU continued discussion of the alternatives for an additional week. During this public review period, an additional 10 alternatives were suggested by members of the public and presented to the BPU at the meeting in January, 1994. The BPU directed that all 30 alter- natives be evaluated in the Scoping Phase. Two additional alternatives were subsequently developed in response to a JULY 31, 1996 request from some members of the pub- lic that multiple small reservoirs be evaluated as an option. Screening and Selection of Alternatives to be Evaluated in the EIRAIS The Screening Report was completed and distributed for public review in March, 1994. The report evaluated all 32 alternatives according to criteria which had been reviewed by the public at the Fall` 1993 workshops and subse- quently adopted by the BPU. Three public workshops were conducted in April and May, 1994 to obtain public comment on which alternatives should be retained for study in the EIR/EIS and how those studies should be conducted. The BPU also received input from the Policy Advisory Committee (comprised of public officials from the Subregional System member communities), Tech- nical Review Group, and the Technical Advisory Committee, who reviewed the Screening Report. In addition, two joint study sessions on the Screening Report were held by the City Council and BPU, during which members of the public and agency representatives commented both orally and in writing regarding which alternatives should be carried forward for study in the EIR/EIS. Based on the findings of the Screening Report and comments received from the public, advisory bodies and agencies in May, 1994, the BPU selected six alter- natives to be retained for study in the EIR/EIS. Subsequently, one alternative was dropped leaving the five alterna- tives considered in this document. DRAFT E 1 R/ E I S 1-15 Public Involvement in Determining the Analysis to be Conducted in the EIR/EIS In addition to the screening of potential project alternatives, Step I -Scoping Phase provided agencies and members of the public the opportunity to comment on the environmental documentation which would be produced for the EIR/EIS. The formal CEQA/NEPA scoping process began with the release of the Notice of Preparation/Notice .of Intent and the Preliminary Scoping Report on October 22, 1994. The Notice of Intent was published in the Federal Register on October 21, 1994. The Preliminary Scoping Report provided a summary of the Project, a description of the alternatives proposed for study, a list of issues and impacts, and a draft scope of work. The formal public scoping meeting was held on November 17, 1994 to receive comments on the Notice of Preparation/Notice of Intent and the Preliminary Scoping Report. Written comments also were received until the close of formal public comment on December 5, 1994. The BPU adopted a revised scope of work in. April, 1995 and the Filial Scoping Report, with addi- tional revisions, was approved in September, 1995. Volume II of the Final Scoping Report is a Feedback Report that traces how and why public comments received during the formal Scoping Phase were used (or not used) in devel- oping the final scope of work for the EIR/EIS. (Refer to the Scoping Report in Appendix U--1, Volume XVI of the Draft EIR%EIS. Appendix U is not included on the CD ROM.) Public lnvolvement during Step 11—Study Phase: Roundtables In November and December, 1995, the City sponsored a series of meetings, called Roundtables, to inform partici- pants about how to comment effectively on the Draft EIR/EIS and to view the preliminary results of the consultant's environmental analysis. The first of two introductory meetings, or Orientation Sessions, provided back- ground information about the EIR/EIS schedule, public involvement, the orga- nization of the EIR/EIS document, and alternatives being studied. The second Orientation Session provided more background on the EIR/EIS process, how to comment effectively on the envi- ronmental information, and how the Roundtables would work. In the Roundtables the environmental consultant presented the approach to analyzing the possible effects of the Project alternatives and shared initial results with participants. The Round - tables provided the opportunity for dia- log between environmental consultants and the public about the work in progress. Participants were able to see how the environmental information would be presented in the Draft EIR/EIS. Questions and continents from participants were encouraged by the moderators to help the consultants reex- amine their methodologies and prelimi- nary results and, if appropriate, modify their approach and analysis to incorporate the participants' comments. 1-16 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY �y�It��ji�-S e>ceg:o�.a� Lo. -.9 -Tac... Wescowacoc Pc �eoe DRAFT EIR/EIS Roundtables and Orientation Sessions Attendees' comments were recorded by were.attended by 160 people. Many City staff and Summary Feedback attended more than one session. Thirty- Reports, presenting an informal record nine individuals and organizations sub- of the proceedings, were mailed to all mitted written comments on the prelimi- participants about six weeks after the nary EIR/EIS information as well. Roundtables concluded. JULY 31, 1996 1-17 Figure 1-5. The Project extends from northwest- ern Marin County to northwestern Sonoma County, covering about 45,000 acres. 1.6 DESCRIPTION OF EXISTING SYSTEM AND ALTERNATIVES Project Location (Refer to Chapter 3.2 in the Draft EIR/EIS.) The Project area is focused on portions of Sonoma County, California, within and adjacent to the cities of Santa Rosa, Rohnert Park, Cotati, Petaluma, and Sebastopol, and extends from the Geysers area north of Healdsburg to the Tolay Creek Valley southeast of Peta- luma and the San Antonio Valley in northern Marin County (see Figure 1-5). Existing System (Refer to Chapter 3.2 in the Draft EI R/EIS.) The Laguna Plant hasa capacity for 18 million gallons per day (average dry weather flow). The Subregional System disposes of reclaimed water by means of a combination of methods, including urban irrigation, created wetlands in the Santa Rosa Plain, agricultural irrigation, and/or discharge to the Russian River via the Laguna de Santa Rosa During the period 1993-1996 additional facilities were constricted to improve the reliability of the reclamation system prior to implementation of the Long - Term Project, for example.- The xample: The Laguna Advanced Treatment Upgrade Project; • The North Pipeline Extension; • The Rohnert Park Water Reuse Project; • The Sludge Composting Facility; • The Laguna Joint Wetlands Project; and • The West Cotati Reclamation Pipeline Project (under design). These interim improvements are not part of the Project; they have each undergone separate environmental review, and most of them have been constructed as of the date of publishing this Draft EIR/EIS. 1-18 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY �^ ` ��'- ��� S brogiorai Long -Toren Wasca.�.acor Pr jo�c DRAFT E I R/ E I S ®escription of Alternatives one-half percent and the design discharge (Refer to Chapter 3.4 in the Draft EIR/EIS.) rate will be one percent of river flow. Alternative 1—No Action (No Project) Alternative The No Action Alternative evaluates impacts which ,would occur if no project were implemented. The No Action Alternative consists of the existing Subregional System, plus various upgrades at the treatment plant and improvements to be constructed under the Interim Period Reclamation System Master. Plan. (Refer to Chapter 3.2 in the Draft EIR/ELS for.fiirther discussion of interim improvements,) Treatment capacity will remain at 18 million gallons per day (average dry weather flow), limited by capacity of the influent pumps. This Alternative assumes continuation of existing water conserva- tion practices by member entities. Alternative 1 is based on the assumption that projected growth as indicated in the currently adopted General Plans of each of the Subregional entities will continue through December, 1997 At that time, it is expected that the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board will no longer allow new sewer hookups, effec- tively creating a building moratorium throughout the Subregional System. This Alternative does not meet the Regional Board reliability requirement. Alternative 2—South County Reclamation Alternative The South County Reclamation Alter-' native uses reclaimed water for agricul- tural irrigation in areas south and east of Santa Rosa (see Figure 1-6). The monthly .average discharge rate will be less than JULY 31, 1996 Within Alternative 2, four subalterna- tives have been defined. These altema- tives differ in the location of the storage facilities for reclaimed water. The alter- natives are: • Alternative 2A—Reservoir Site: Tolay Extended • Alternative 2B—Reservoir Site: Adobe Road and Lakeville Hillside Figure 1-6. Alternative 2, South County Reclamation with four subalternatives 1-19 • Alternative 2C—Reservoir Site Tolay Confined • Alternative 2D—Reservoir Site: Sears Point and Lakeville Hillside Alternative 3 --West County Declamation Alternative The West County. Reclamation Alterna- tive uses reclaimed water for agricultural irrigation in areas south and west of the Laguna de Santa Rosa (see Figure 1-7). The monthly average discharge rate will be less than one-half percent and the design discharge rate will be one percent of river flow. Within Alternative 3, five subalterna- tives have been defined. Again, these alternatives differ in the location of the storage facilities for reclaimed water. The alternatives are: • Alternative 3A—Reservoir Site: Two Rock • Alternative 3B—Reservoir Site: Bloomfield • Alternative 3C—Reservoir Site: Carroll Road • Alternative 3D—Reservoir Site: Valley Ford • Alternative 3E—Reservoir Site: Huntley Figure 1-7. Alternative 3, West County Reclamation, with five subalternatives 1-20 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY a Alternative 4—Geysers Recharge Alternative The Geysers Recharge Alternative provides for transmission of reclaimed water to the Geysers, located in the Mayacamas Mountains northeast of Healdsburg, for injection and recharge of the Geysers steamfield, which is currently used as a source for geother- Figure 1-8. Alternative 4, Geysers Recharge JULY 31, 1996 mal energy (see Figure 1-8). This alternative will involve discharge to the Russian River only during peak wet weather events (much less than one percent on average), and no additional storage is proposed. It is assumed that existing agricultural irrigation acreage will be reduced by about 2,000 acres through attrition. W..s.ce— — P. j— D R AFT E I R/ E IS 1-21 Figure 1-9. Alternative 5, Discharge, with two sub - alternatives Alternative 5— Discharge Alternative The Discharge Alternative provides for the release of reclaimed water at a monthly average discharge rate of four percent and a design discharge rate of up to 20 percent of river flow (see Figure 1-9). Under Alternative 5 no additional reuse or storage of reclaimed water will be required. Within Alternative 5, two subaltema- tives have been defined. These altema- tives differ in the location of discharge of reclaimed water. The alternatives are: • Alternative 5A—Discharge Location: Russian River • Alternative 5B—Discharge Location: Laguna de Santa Rosa Discharge directly to the Russian River requires a new outfall structure located upstream of the Sonoma County Water Agency intakes. Discharge to the Laguna would occur at the existing outfall locations. Improvements Common to Several Alternatives Alternatives 2, 3, 4, and 5 include expansion of the headworks pumps at the Laguna Plant. Alternatives 2 and 3 include urban irrigation projects in the Fountaingrove and Bennett Valley areas of Santa Rosa. Continuation of tertiary treatment is included in all alternatives. 1-22 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY / ter^-✓'' S..bregior�al Lor.g-T r... Write.,.. _ Proje DRAFT EIR / EIS ®ascription of Components of 350 acres, including parks, schools, (Refer to Chapter 3.5 in the Draft EIR/EIS.) and the Bennett Valley Golf Course. The alternatives evaluated in this EIR/EIS are comprised of various combinations of components such as pipelines and storage reservoirs. All elements of the Project alternatives are included in one of the components described below. Headworks Expansion The headworks pumps move sewage from the plant .intake to the treatment facilities. The capacity of these pumps currently determines the treatment capacity of the Laguna Plant. . Expansion will be accomplished by replacing existing pumps with new pumps, providing a maximum capacity of 80 million gallons per day for peak wet weather flows, with one pump held in reserve should another need repair. Urban Irrigation Two urban irrigation systems will deliver reclaimed water to replace groundwater and/or potable City water now used: • The Fountaingrove Urban Irrigation System is an extension of the existing reclaimed water irrigation system into the north Santa Rosa area, providing year-round irrigation of approximately 230 acres, including schools, parks, the Fountaingrove Golf Course, and other properties; and • The Bennett Valley/East Santa Rosa Urban Irrigation System is an extension of the existing reclaimed Water irriga- tion system into the east Santa Rosa area, providing year-round irrigation JULY 31, 1996 The urban irrigation component will dispose of 380 million gallons of reclaimed water annually, or about 4.5 percent of total disposal needs. Pipelines Pipelines will transport reclaimed water from the Laguna Plant to storage reser- voirs and distribute stored water from reservoirs to agricultural irrigation areas in Alternatives 2 and 3. Transmission pipelines (i.e., from Laguna Plant to reservoir) are typically 48 inches in diameter and may function as distribu- tion pipelines (i.e., from reservoir to agricultural irrigation areas) during irrigation season. Distribution pipe- lines range from 6 to 24 inches in diam- eter. Pipelines are proposed for the Fountaingrove and Bennett Valley Urban Irrigation Systems, conveying reclaimed water from the West College Ponds to various urban irrigation sites. Pipelines are required in Alternative 4 (Geysers Recharge) to transport reclaimed Urban Irrigation. Year-round irrigation of 610 acres will dispose of about 380 million gallons of reclaimed water annually. 1-23 Pipelines. Up to 90 miles of pipeline will need to be installed if a remote storage reservoir is selected. Storage Reservoirs. The largest reservoir, Tolay Extended, would hold 5.6 billion gallons, cover 800 acres, and have a dam 90 feet high. water from Delta Pond to the Geysers area, a lift of 3,300 feet. Pipelines would range from 42 to 48 inches in diameter. Alternative 5A (Russian River Discharge) requires a new 48 -inch pipeline from Delta Pond to the Russian River. Alternative 5B (Laguna Discharge) does not require new pipelines. Pipelines will be buried and will gener- ally follow public rights-of-way. To reach reservoir sites, some pipelines will follow private roads or cross-country alignments. Storage Reservoirs Ten potential storage reservoirs are included in the Project alternatives; five each in South County and West County. Seven of the reservoir sites satisfy the maximum storage require- ments for the Project. Two of the fol- lowing reservoirs would be necessary to meet storage requirements: Sears Point, Adobe Road, and Lakeville Hillside. Reservoirs will be constructed by damming a natural drainage or valley with an earth -filled embankment dam. The dam would have a clay core and rock facing for slope protection. For all main dams, a concrete -lined, chute -type spillway will extend from the embank- ment downslope to an energy dissipation structure in a channel below. The energy dissipation structure will .consist of a rock lining for the natural creek channel, downstream from the spillway. Some reservoirs require back darns and saddle dams to prevent reclaimed water from inundating specific areas. Some reservoirs require concrete lined diver- sion structures to route storm runoff around them. Pump Stations To deliver reclaimed water to West County and South County storage reservoir sites, a new pump station will be located adjacent to the existing station at the Meadowlane ponds across from the Laguna Plant. To deliver reclaimed water to the Sebastopol agri- cultural irrigation area, a new pump station will be required at Delta Pond. Urban irrigation systems will require new source pump stations at the West College ponds. 1-24 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY To distribute stored water from reser- voirs to agricultural irrigation areas, one pump station will be required near the foot of each reservoir dam. In addition to these pump stations, reservoirs at Tolay Extended, Tolay Confined, and Adobe Road also. require stormwater pump stations to divert runoff around and downstream of the reservoir. For Alternative 4, the Geysers Recharge Alternative, a series of four high= pressure pump stations will be required' to transport the water about 35 miles from Delta Pond to the Geysers area northeast of Healdsburg. No additional pumping capacity will be required for either Discharge Alternative. Agricultural Irrigation The South County and West County alternatives provide an increase in acreage of agricultural irrigation. For the South County, an additional 3,800 acres of agricultural irrigation will be .required. For the West County, an additional 6,200 acres"of agricultural irrigation is required. If agricultural irrigation in the Sebastopol area is utilized (2,200 acres) the agricultural irrigation requirements will be reduced to 2,600 acres for the South County and 4,300 acres for the West Comity. Reclaimed water delivered to these areas will be distributed by additional local pipelines to irrigation systems operated by individual users. Geysers Steamfield This component will supply reclaimed - water to the Geysers for injection into the geothermal steamfield. The intent is ��� �^--���$ brog:or.e� Lor.g-Tor... Wascawncur Projo�c D R A FT El R/ El S to reduce decline in steam production, prolonging the life and economic production of the stean►field and geothermal power plants it supplies. This component includes two 1,000,000 gallon storage tanks at the end of the transmission pipeline, distribution pipelines to convey water from the storage tanks to the Geysers injection wells, and conversion of 10 to 15 exist- ing geothermal wells to injection wells. Agricultural Irrigation. The acreage required for each alternative takes into account the water consumption rate for the climate and soils of the area. Geysers Steamfield. Existing geothermal production wells will be converted for use as reclaimed water injection wells. JULY 31, 1996 1-25 w MI'M Y.7^— t �'�{� !�` �PlIP rR ? "i{ e tai idi;�s +��3jd� ze n,r•1 "Any 'tom 5 % r! J'l�r.L ''..,• '� 'r'�` "'�i^"f y�.c-,z - y"! "e .�1.�4�i�-i 9' "yi' Discharge. The existing dischage outfalls, one of which is pictured here, would be used for Alternatives 1, 2, 3, 4, and 58. 1-26 Discharge Two discharge options are considered: new discharge at the Russian River and continued discharge into the Laguna de Santa Rosa from the existing storage ponds. A new outfall structure will be Table 1-2. located on the east bank of the Russian River for the Russian River Discharge Alternative. No new construction will be required for Laguna discharge. Cost Estimates (Refer to Chapter 3.6 in the Draft EIR/EIS.) An estimate of major capital, operation, and maintenance costs for project alter- natives (in 1995 dollars) was prepared at a planning level of detail, to allow a rela- tive cost comparison among alternatives (see Table 1-2). CumUlatiVe Projects (Refer to Chapter 3.7 in the Draft EIR/EIS.) Cumulative impacts were evaluated based on a cumulative project list. Cumulative projects are defined as those Cost Estimates Alternative Capital Cost' (1,000s) Additional Annual Operation & Maintenance Cost (1,000s) 1 No Action (No Project) 0 0 2A Tolay Extended $312,300 $2,500 2B Adobe Road and Lakeville Hillside 352,200 2,400 2C Tolay Confined 353,300 2,600 2D Sears Point and Lakeville Hillside 376,700 3,200 3A Two Rock 246,400 1,600 3B Bloomfield 282,700 1,700 3C Carroll Road 243,500 1,800 3D Valley Ford 251,500 1,800 3E Huntley 253,900' 1,700 4 Geyser, Recharge 208,300 6,700 5A Discharge to Russian River 64,000 100 5B Discharge to Laguna 46,400 0 'Capital costs include constniction, engineering, and land costs. INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY a past, present or reasonably foreseeable future projects with environmental impacts related to Project impacts. The cumulative Project study area is defined as the watersheds of water bodies poten tially affected by one or more Project components: namely the Russian River, Petaluma River, Americano Creek, Stemple Creek, and Tolay Creek. One potentially cumulative project is the City of Santa Rosa's 1996 update of its General Plan. Refer to Section 3.5 in Description of Existing System and Alternatives, for a discussion of this project. JULY 31, 1996 ����r�`'' S..gre9:o..ei Lo..g-Torte. Wesceweeer Proje�c DRAFT EIR / EIS required Rermits and Approvals (Refer to Chapter 3.8 in the Draft EIR/EIS.) There are numerous potentially applica- ble federal, state, regional, county, and city permits required for the construction, maintenance, and operation of the Project. The Permitting Report (HBA November 1995) identifies permits and approvals to be obtained and timing ofpermit acquisition. (Refer to Appendix D-5, Volume IV.) 1-27 1. % AREAS OF CONTROVERSY AND INDEX OF KEY ISSUES TO BE RESOLVED (Refer to. the Scoping Report, Appendix U of the Draft EIR/EIS. This Appendix is not contained on the CD ROM.) During the Scoping Phase described herein, environmental issues were identified for dis- cussion it this EIR/EIS. The issues are listed below with the chapter or section reference. Table 1-3. Issues Chapter/Section Agricultural production value 4.18. Socio -economics Air emissions 4.12. Air Quality Archaeological resources 4.15. Cultural Resources and Paleontology Area of Special Biological Significance 4.6. Surface Water Quality Biological resources 4.8 Terrestrial Biological Resources, 4.9 Aquatic Biological Resources. and 4.10 Jurisdictional Wetlands Resources Community Separators 4.1. Land Use and 4.14. Visual Resources Earthquake -induced groundshaking 4.3. Geology, Soils, and Seismicity and liquefaction Energy requirements 4.17. Energy Erosion, regarding loss of soil productivity 4.2. Agriculture Erosion, due to construction 4.3. Geology, Soils, and Seismicity, Erosion, regarding streambank erosion 4.4. Surface Water Hydrology due to discharge Fish and wildlife 4.8 Terrestrial Biological Resources and 4.9 Aquatic Biological Resources Flooding due to dam failure 4.19. Inundation due to Dam Failure and 4.7. Public Health and Safety Flooding due to discharge 4.4. Surface Water Hydrology General Plan consistency Each section Groundwater 4.5 Groundwater Growth inducing impacts Chapter 5 Gulf of the Farallones National 4.6. Surface Water Quality and Marine Sanctuary 4.9. Aquatic Biological Resources Hazardous waste sites 4.7. Public Health and Safety Historical resources 4.15. Cultural Resources and Paleontology (Continues) 1-28 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY (Continued) Issues Cha pter/Section Incompatible land uses 4.1. Land Use Induced seismicity at the Geysers 4.3. Geology, Soils, and Seismicity Land acquisition Each section and Appendix D-7 Light and glare 4.14. Visual Resources Loss of agricultural lands 4.2. Agriculture Mineral resource designations 4.1. Land Use National Register properties 4.15. Cultural Resources and Paleontology Noise 4.13 Noise Odors 4.12. Air Quality Open space land converted to urban uses 4.1. Land Use Paleontologic resources 4.15. Cultural Resources and Paleontology Parks and recreation 4.16. Public Services, Utilities. and Recreation Police and fire services 4.16. Public Services, Utilities, and Recreation Public exposure to chemicals 4.7. Public Health and Safety and pathogens Rare or tlueatened species and habitat 4.8. Terrestrial Biological Resources and 4.9. Aquatic Biological Resources Sediment quality 4.6. Surface Water Quality Service. charges and demand fees 4.18. Socio -economics Streainbank erosion 4.4. Surface Water Hydrology Tourism 4.18. Socio-econonucs Trace elements and salinity buildup 4.2. Agriculture Traffic; congestion, and restricted access 4.11. Transportation Unstable slopes 4.3. Geology, Soils and Seismicity Water Quality 4.6, Surface Water Quality Wetlands 4.10 Jurisdictional Wetlands Resources Williamson Act 4.2. Agriculture Zoning 4.1. Land Use JULY 31, 1996 DR AFT E I R/ E IS 1-29 1.8 MITIGATION AND MONITORING PROGRAM (Refer to Chapter 2 in the Draft EIR/EIS.) Project mitigation measures are divided into several types: • Section 2. 1, Compliance with Existing Programs, lists regulations and agency Regarding Mitigation CEQA Section 21.001: "The Legislature finds and declares that it is the policy of the state that public agencies should not approve projects as proposed if there are feasible altema- tives or feasible mitigation measures available which would substantially lessen the significant environmental effect of such projects..." Both NEPA and CEQA define mitigation as follows: (a)- Avoiding the impact altogether by not taking a certain action or parts of an action. (b) Minimizing impacts by limiting the degree or magnitude of the action and its implementation. (c) Rectifying the impact by repairing, rehabilitating, or restoring the impacted environment. (d) Reducing or eliminating the impact over time by preservation and maintenance operations during the life of the action. (e) Compensating for the impact by replacing or providing substitute resources or environments. A Mitigation Monitoring Program is required under CEQA Section 21081.6 to ensure compliance with adopted mitiga- tion measures during project implementation._ Similarly, NEPA Section 1505.2(c) requires that the Record of Decision compel compliance with the mitigation measures contained in it through a monitoring and enforcement program. . requirements which avoid or minimize environmental impacts. For example, the State Division "of Safety of Dams is listed because that agency regulates how dams at the reservoir sites must be designed and constructed to pre- vent failure. (Refer to Section 2.1 in the DraftEIRIEIS.) • Section 2.2, Measures Included in the Project, lists 27 measures which have been adopted as part of the Project by the City. These measures require both avoidance and nuranization of impacts. For example, Measure 2.2.5, Avoid Sensitive Biological Resources, requires that the City install pipelines under streambeds using a jack and bore construction technique at 35 stream crossings. (Refer to Section 2.2 in the Draft EIIUEIS.) • Sections 2.3, 2.4, and 2.5, Planning, Construction, and Operation and Maintenance Measures, list mitigation measures which serve to avoid, reduce, rectify, and compensate for identified impacts, These measures must be approved by the City, at the time of Project approval as its commitment to implementation. (Refer to Sections 2.3. 2. d, and 2.5 in the Draft EIR/ELS.) In addition to the specific measures listed in Chapter 2 of the Draft EIR/EIS, the design of the Project alternatives involves many features which serve to avoid or minimize impacts. These features continued to evolve as the environmental evaluation of the Project alternatives progressed. 1-30 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.9 ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS ARID MITIGATION (Refer to Chapter 4 in the Draft EIRIDS.) A brief summary of the potential environ- mental impacts and mitigation measures is provided below for each section in Chapter 4 of the Draft EIR/EIS. Follow- ing this summary, Table 1.13 provides a list of evaluation criteria, significant impacts,..and mitigation measures. Land Use (Refer to Chapter 4.1 of _the Draft EIRIDS.) Potential land use impacts may occur if the Project would change land use in a manner inconsistent with applicable public policies or cause a loss of open space. Two significant land use impacts have been identified. Alternatives 2B and 3A, Adobe Road and Two Rock reservoir sites, conflict with the Sonoma County Aggregate Resource Management Plan, because the storage reservoirs will prevent use of an existing or potential quarry. The impact on aggregate resources at the Two Rock reservoir site cannot be mitigated due to the volume of aggregate material underlying the reservoir. However, most of the resource at Adobe Road can be used in construc- tion of the reservoir. Alternative 4, Geysers Recharge, will require conversion of public open space for a pump station located along Pine Flat Road on property. for which the Sonoma County Agricultural Preserva- tion and Open Space District holds con- servation easements. This impact can be mitigated to a level below significance. JULY 31, 1996 Storage reservoirs for agricultural irriga- tion are not specifically addressed in the Sonoma County General Plan or Zomig Ordinance.. Based upon the function of the reservoirs as an integral part of agri- cultural production and the presence of, other agricultural reservoirs in similar zones, it appears that the reservoirs will be consistent with the General Plan and zoning. None of the Project facilities are located in a designated Community Separator. One pump station and portions of West County agricultural irrigation areas are within the Marin or Sonoma County Coastal Zone. Agriculture (Refer to Chapter 4.2 of the Draft EIRIDS.) Impacts to agriculture were analyzed to detennine whether the Project will result in conversion of prime agricultural land to a non-agricultural use, and whether the Project will impair the agricultural productivity of prime agricultural land. Impacts will occur primarily due to con- struction of reservoirs, resulting in loss of prime farmland and the cancellation DRAFT EIR / EIS Table 14. Each reservoir site has either grazing land or farm land or both Loss of Farm & Grazing Land at Reservoir Sites (acres) Farm Grazing, Tolay Extended 45.6 158 Adobe Road 28 147 Tolay Confined 108 76 Lakeville Hillside 0 152 .Sears.Point 0 274 Two Rock 114 115 Bloomfield 0 195 Carroll Road 0 241 Valley Ford 0 230 Huntlev 0 184 1-31 of Williamson Act contracts (see Table 1-4). At the same time, provision of reclaimed water for irrigation will have a beneficial impact on the amount of prime farmland in the study area, by raising the status of land to a more productive category as measured by the State Farmlands Mapping Program. However, the increase un acres qualifying as Prime Farmland cannot be estimated, because it is unknown which land- owners may contract with the City for reclaimed water. Construction of the Bloomfield and Huntley reservoirs (Alternatives 313 and 3E) will result in the cancellation of Williamson Act contracts for two adjoining properties remaining in private ownership after acquisition of the reservoir site, as the remainder of these parcels would be less than the minimum for such contracts. Construction of pump stations will result in loss of prime farmland under Alter- natives 2, 3, and 4. There is no mitigation available to reduce impacts from loss of prime fanr►land or cancellation of William- son Act contracts to less than significant. Agricultural irrigation will have a signif- icant adverse impact on soil productivity due to erosion of topsoil; however, miti- gation is available to reduce this impact to less than significant. The Project will not have a significant effect on soil pro- ductivity due to build up of trace ele- ments or.salts. Caeologyo Soils, and Seismicity (Refer to Chapter 4.3 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) The Geology section analyzes issues related to slope stability, earthquakes (including ground rupture, shaking, liquefaction, and induced seismicity at the Geysers), and soil limitations such as corrosiveness and expansiveness. Unstable slope conditions present problems for some South County reser- voirs, which will experience accelerated siltation. Unstable slopes will also affect the Geysers pipeline. Although all of the alternatives are potentially subject to strong ground shaking in an earthquake, these impacts can be avoided by con- structing facilities according to require- ments of the Division of Safety of Danns and building codes, and impacts are, therefore, less than significant. Liquefaction is a concern for the Russian River outfall and four pump stations common to both the South County and West County Reclamation alternatives, and the hazard can be miti- gated to a level below significance. The Geysers and urban irrigation pipelines cross an active fault. As a result, the Discharge Alternative is the only option not subject to the significant impacts associated with ground rupture. Geysers injection will cause a modest increase in induced seismicity, but impacts will be less than significant due to the small magnitude of the seismic events and the small increase it frequency of such events. Some South County Alternative facilities will be subject to damage from expan- sive and corrosive soils, but these impacts can be mitigated. Erosion during construction will not be significant for any of the alternatives with implementa- tion of appropriate erosion control plans. 1-32 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY Surface Water Hydrology (Refer to Chapter 4.4 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) None of the components associated with the Reclamation, Geysers, or Discharge alternatives will cause significant streambank erosion or significantly affect flooding ul the Laguna de Santa Rosa or Russian River. However, the cumulative effect of reclaimed water discharge and increased runoff due to development in the Russian River water- shed may cause a significant flooding impact. The Project's contribution to flooding would be mitigated by avoiding discharge during flood conditions.. (Groundwater (Refer to Chapter 4.5 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) Both South and West County alterna- tives will degrade groundwater quality of existing and potential drinking water wells, as a- result of nitrate levels in reclaimed water migrating from reser- voirs. Reservoirs will also deplete groundwater levels in the immediate vicinity of the dam. These impacts can be mitigated by monitoring groundwater movement and levels and providing an alternative water supply if necessary. Localized groundwater mounding near West County reservoirs will affect leach - fields, which can be mitigated with installation of non -conventional septic systems. Geysers Recharge and Russian River Discharge alternatives will not affect quantity or quality of groundwater in drinking water wells. Surface Water Quality (Refer to Chapter 4.6 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) The Surface Water Quality section eval- uates the potential of the Project to JULY 31, 1996 ��7�-�" s�.b�agio�al Lo..g-Tam... Waacawace� P� jo�c D R A F T E I R/ E I S exceed EPA standards designed to protect aquatic life and Regional Water Quality Control Board standards designed to protect beneficial uses of surface waters. Also, the section specifically addresses water quality changes in special sites, including the esteros and the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Finally, the section evaluates Project impacts relative to proposed EPA sedi- ment quality standards. The No Action Alternative, which includes a slight increase in discharge to the Laguna de Santa Rosa compared with existing conditions, will have both significant adverse and beneficial impacts on biostinu>latory substances in the Laguna, depending upon hydrologic conditions; however, adverse effects will be more frequent than beneficial effects. In addition, the City will not be able to meet its Waste Reduction Strategy goal assigned by the Regional Water Quality Control Board. (This Strategy assigns goals for nitrogen: and -ammonia reduc- tion for dairies along the Laguna and discharge from the Subregional System.) Significant impacts due to increased tox- icity and cyanide levels.will also occur. Reservoirs in both the South and West County alternatives will result un seepage which will cause significant water quality impacts, for a short segment of stream below each darn. The one percent design discharge (refer to page 13 of this Summary for an explanation of design discharge) to the Laguna associated with the South and West County alternatives will have both significant adverse and beneficial impacts on biostimulatory substances under different hydrologic conditions; 1-33 Water Quality Terminology Water quality criteria (standards) have been developed by.the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Regional Water Quality Control Board to protect aquatic life and to protect against aesthetic water quality impacts. Here are some of the types of conditions which have led to establishment of die criteria: • Biostimulation. Growth -inducing substances, such as nitro- gen, can stimulate plant production. This growth, known as biostimulation, can consume more oxygen than is available in the water. Because dissolved oxygen is required for aquatic plants and animals, depletion of oxygen that occurs in associ- ation with heave algae blooms is undesirable. No numeric criteria have been established by federal or state authorities for nitrogen compounds to prevent biostimulation: instead a narrative criterion has been established to limit biostiniulatoiy effects and to control algae. • Toxicity and Bioaccumulation. Organic compounds and metals (for example, pesticides, PCBs_ petroleum products, and copper) can be toxic to aquatic life. Many metals are required for normal plant or animal growth and are toxic only at higher concentrations. Bioaccumulation occurs when a constituent accumulates in biological tissue to levels that exceed the concentration in surrounding water. Some sub- stances are toxic but do not bioaccumulate (for example,'salt and ammonia). Other substances are not toxic at concentra- tions found normally in water, but are toxic at concentrations that can develop through the food chain (for example, PCBs). Numeric criteria have been established for many toxic effects, but not for bioaccuinulation. Instead, potential bioac- cumulation impacts are generally evaluated through an eco- logical risk assessment, which can be. found in the Draft EIR/EIS Aquatic Biological Resources Section, 49. Physical and Habitat Effects. Some substances have dain- aging effects on habitat or directly on -organisms. For exam- ple, silt can affect fish gills or accumulate in the bottom of a creek, rendering the creek unsuitable for organisms that require sand or gravel for reproduction. No numeric criteria have been established for physical substances, but narrative criteria have been set for turbidity, oil and grease, suspended matter, settleable matter, floating material, and color. • Aesthetics. The narrative criteria listed above for physical and habitat effects also protect against aesthetic impacts. however, beneficial effects will be more frequent. Also, these alternatives will meet the City's Waste Reduction Strategy goals. Irrigation in both South and West County alternatives will result in sub - flow (underground flow) discharge to local creeks. The impact on South County streams is less than significant. The West County Alternative irrigation subflow will discharge to Americano and Stemple creeks. These feed into the Estero Americano and the Estero de San Antonio, which are part of the National Marine Sanctuary, where any change to the water quality is considered significant. Changes in salinity, ammonia concentra- tion, dissolved oxygen, biostimulation, metals, nutrients, individual inorganic minerals, and organic compounds will occur in the esteros. The 20 percent design discharge altema- tives will result in significant impacts to the Russian River, the Laguna, and Santa Rosa Creek. A 20 percent design discharge to either the Laguna or the Russian River will have both significant adverse and ben- eficial impacts with respect to biostimula- tory substances and turbidity depending upon hydrologic conditions; however, adverse impacts will be more frequent. A 20 percent design discharge to the Russian River will also have significant adverse impacts, with respect to conduc- tivity. By moving the existing discharge from the Laguna to the Russian River, a significant contribution will be made toward reaching the City's Waste Reduction Strategy goals in the Laguna. Conversely, a 20 percent design discharge to the Laguna will have 1-34 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY significant adverse impacts on Waste Reduction Strategy goals, as well as adverse impacts on water quality with respect to dissolved oxygen, cyanide, and toxicity levels, but a beneficial impact on turbidity. Mitigation will reduce some discharge impacts, such as those with respect to cyanide, turbidity, Waste Reduction Strategy, and toxicity, below the level of significance. Other discharge impacts, such as those on conductivity, dissolved oxygen, and biostimulatory substances, will be significant and unavoidable. However, the cumulative projects include reduction of nutrients to the Laguna. With implementation of cumulative pro- jects and mitigation proposed for the Long -Terra Project discharge impacts, the 20% design discharge to the Laguna will have a less -than -significant impact. Impacts of storage and irrigation on streams will also be reduced below the level of significance, but impacts of storage and irrigation on the esteros will remain significant. Public Heaitt, and Safety (Refer to Chapter 4.7 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) Based on findings of the human health risk assessment (see insert), potential exposure to pathogen ic, organ isms and to all chemicals except nitrate is less than significant for all alternatives. The only potentially significant impact is exposure to uicreased nitrate concen- tration resulting from migration of groundwater from reservoirs'to local water wells in West and South County, as noted in the Groundwater Section. This impact will be mitigated by JULY 31, 1996 Y/'�' �-�-✓�"`-` S b�eg:o..a� Lo..y-To...� Woscewe P- j - DRAFT EIR/EIS H<>w Risk Assessment Works A risk assessment models how chemicals and pathogens move through the environment and what effects they might have on humans, animals, and their food supplies. Risk assessment is a scientifically recognized way to analyze these potential effects without actually subjecting the real world environment to risk. Two separate risk assessments are included in this EIR/EIS. The Ecological Risk Assessment analyzes Project impacts on fish and wildlife either through direct contact with chemicals in surface soil, water, and sedi- ments, or through ingestion. The Human Health Risk Assessment analyzes health risks to humans in a similar fashion, by assessing the direct effects of exposure to reclaimed water as well as the indirect effects of eating fish caught in water bodies which receive reclaimed water discharges. Risk assessment models are set up by making assumptions that deliberately overestimate all the components of risk, a much more severe situation than could ever be expected to occur in reality. For example, the Public Health Risk Assessment assumes that humans would use 100% reclaimed water as their domestic water supply for their life- time. By assuming conditions much worse than could occur in the real world, the risk assessment provides the assurance that a prediction of no impact, means no impact in reality. The Ecological Risk Assessment is in the Aquatic Biological Resources Section 4.9, and the Public Health Risk Assessment is in the Public Health and Safety Section, 4.7. monitoring groundwater movement and providing an alternative water supply as necessary. Due to the headworks expansion at the Laguna Plant, increased chlorine use is expected; this will not present a significant risk because existing safety procedures provide appropriate safeguards. All safety hazards associated with construction can be mitigated. Danis associated with the West and South County alternatives 1-35 Loss of Nativa Piant Communities at Reservoir Sites (acres) Oak Riparian Native Woodland Woodland Grassland Tolay Extended 0 7 25 Adobe Road 17 60 0 Tolay Confined 0 7 25 Lakeville Hillside 0 11 0.6 Sears Point 0.6 59 0 Two Rock 54 16 1 Bloomfield 0.6 10 0 Carroll Road 0 17 1 Valley Ford 1 9 0 Huntley 0 5 2 Table 1-S. Sensitive native plant communities have undergone substan- tial reductions throughout California. Further loss due to the Project must be fully mitigated. would be constructed in accordance with requirements of the Division of Safety of Dams, and will therefore be expected to pose an insignificant risk to public safety from dam failure and resultant flooding. terrestrial Biological Resources (Refer to Chapter 4.8 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) The evaluation indicates that no endan- gered, rare, or threatened terrestrial species or their habitat will be affected by the Project. Many impacts will be avoided by measures adopted as part of the Project which require relocation of pipeline alignments, pump stations, and other facilities in response to sensitive biological resources. Also, measures included in the Project will require sen- sitive resources, such as oak woodlands and riparian woodlands in the agricultural imgation areas, to be avoided. The primary significant impact of the Project is loss of sensitive plant commu- nities such as oak woodland, native grassland, and riparian woodland, through construction of storage reservoirs (see Table 1-5). These impacts will be mitigated through compensatory measures in the Sensitive Biological Resources Conservation Program and Revegetation Program. A significant but mitigable impact is the loss of sensitive native plant communities due to the outfall structure required for the Russian River Discharge Alternative. The combined impact of the Project and cumulative projects results in three new significant impacts: loss of hayfield tar - plant and bristly linanthus populations at Two Rock and Huntley; loss of annual grassland for all the reclamation alternatives; and, increased ecological risk to fish-eatuig birds for alternatives discharging to the Laguna. Mitigation is provided for the plant population and ecological risk, but no feasible mitiga- tion has been identified for the loss of annual grassland. Aquatic Biological Resources (Refer to Chapter 4.9 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) The evaluation indicates that the only endangered, rare, or threatened aquatic species or habitat affected by the Project is the red -legged frog. There are two closely related subspecies of red -legged frog in the Project area. Northem red - legged frogs are a California Depart- ment of Fish and Game species of special concern. The California red -legged frog is federally -threatened. The recent federal ruling establishing the status of California red -legged frog as federally -threatened provided the 1-36 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY geographic range of the species..Red- legged frogs at the South County reser- voir sites are identified as the Califomia subspecies and are considered federally - threatened. All other red -legged frogs in the Project area appear to. be the northern subspecies, although final confirmation has not been received. Pending confir- mation, the Draft EIR/EIS considers all red -legged frogs in the Project area to be the California subspecies. Many impacts will be avoided by measures adopted as part of the Project which, for example, require jack and bore construction techniques for place- ment of pipelines across streams. Habitat for a species of special concern, the northwestern pond turtle, was found at the Tolay reservoir sites. This significant impact will be mitigated by compensatory measures in the Sensitive Biological Resources Conservation Program. Freshwater marsh, valuable stream habitat, or pond habitat will be lost due to reservoir construction at all the reser- voir sites except Bloomfield, Valley Ford, and Huntley. Dams at storage reservoirs will cut off flows downstream, significantly affectnig aquatic habitat at all reservoir sites except Sears Point, Two Rock, and Huntley. These significant impacts will be mitigated through compensatory measures found in the Sensitive Biological Resource' Conservation Program. . An ecological risk assessment was per- formed to evaluate potential impacts due to bioaccumulation or toxicity in aquatic ��� ��S.breg:or�al Long -Term. Wascewac�r Projeoe DRAFT EIR/EIS species exposed to reclaimed water from the storage reservoir, agricultural irrigation, or discharge components. This screening level risk assessment identified no sig- nificant impacts for any ofthe components. Significant impacts were identified for the West County Reclamation Alternative because both reservoirs and agricultural irrigation will cause some alteration of aquatic habitat in the esteros, a part of the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. Because of the sensi- tivity of the esteros' ecology and the regulatory environment of the Sanctuary, any effect in this region is considered significant, and no feasible mitigation has been identified. iurisdictional Wetlands Mesources (Refer to Chapter 4.10 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) Substantial acreage of wetlands will be destroyed by construction of the storage reservoirs for both the South County and West County Reclamation Alternatives (see Table 1-6). Less than an acre of wetlands will be filled for the outfall structure associated with the Russian River Discharge Alternative. Each of these impacts is significant and will be mitigated through compensatory measures identified in tlne Sensitive Bio- logical Resources Conservation 'Program. Also, pipeline alignments for the Reclamation and Geysers Recharge alternatives cross several intermittent .streams, where construction will take place during the dry season. Though no permanent fill will be placed in the streams, there will be some disturbance JULY 31, 1996 1-37 Loss c f Wetlands at Reservoir Sites (acres) Tolay Extended 248 Adobe Road 3U Tolay Coned 87 Lakeville Hillside 22 Sears Point 53 Two Rock 62 Bloomfield 57 Carroll Road 69 Valley Ford 102 Huntley 48 Table 1-6. To meet the state and federal policies of no net loss of wetlands, all loss of wetlands will be fully mitigated. Table .1-7. If sensitive biological or visual resources or private improvements are. located within the public right-ofway, pipeline constructionmay be moved into one lane of traffic to avoid impacts. of stream environment, resulting in significant impact. This impact will be mitigated through limitations on the timing of construction, careful revegeta- tion, and restoration of the streanhbed. Transportation (Refer to Chapter 4.11 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) The Project will not generate significant traffic in the post -construction phase, and there are no permanent changes Roadway Milas Afffectad by Pipeline Construction 1 -No Action 0 2A-Tolay Extended7,i';3,"r:tf-,;,'��'••,f� 76 T o' 2VB-Adobe/Lakeville - �--_,rre�s-r't "'`== 76 U L c 2C-Tolay Confined�.- %$ N 2D-Lakeville/Sears Point�it:tr a+*Ii1,.,,W'-.u'a'l iF�:�,.,',r ..',.:.,V.ti+.0 tea", 'ahs,;; 80 3A -Two Rock F ,,MrN+.a:,.Fs '3:i.x r -: `."'i'L�`", *'r'': .` .'i;,.',�;_ 78 3&Bloomfield-'�.F'',.,.,.�;�'.,. = -F ,,.. `.rs¢ 84 0 v 3C-Carroll-Road"'�_y#-."4"""-"'""° I -- 78 3 3D -Valley Ford _ ,W.- _ ,�, 78 3E-Huntley78' 4 -Geysers Recharge42 - 5A -Russian River Discharge N �"--� 16 , 5B -Laguna Discharge 0 planned for the existing transportation network. Therefore, the transportation evaluatio►i focuses on construction -related impacts. Many construction -related impacts have been avoided through Standard Traffic'.Control Procedures adopted as part of the Project. (Refer to Measures 19-23 in Chapter 2.2 of - the Draft BIR/EIS'.) These Procedures provide for notification and rerouting of emergency vehicles, management of lane closures and access, jack and bore construction for pipelines under high volume roadways and railroads, parking and road repair requirements, limitations on construction and delivery hours, transportation and encroachment permit requirements, and safety procedures. Remaining significant traffic impacts will occur during the construction phase of all alternatives (except the Laguna Discharge Alternative, which involves no construction). Table 1-7 indicates how many miles of pipeline would need to be built withinthe public right-of- way for each alternative. Lane closures for pipeline construction will delay traffic, delay transit services, restrict access, increase safety hazards, and reroute traffic, including emergency vehicles. Also, construction traffic will add vehicles and trucks to local roads, causing significant congestion. Air Quality (Refer to Chapter 4.12 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) Construction of reservoirs associated with the West County and South County alternatives will generate emissions 1-38 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY exceeding the point of significance for particulates (dust), nitrogen oxides, and carbon monoxide. Construction of the Geysers steamfield component will also cause short -tern emissions of nitrogen oxides exceeding threshold levels. Although mitigation will reduce emis- sions, the impact would still be significant. Operational emissions'will not -be signif- icant for any of the alternatives. Increased emissions from the expansion of the headworks were determined to exceed trigger levels, but a screening - level risk' analysis performed as part of a previous environmental analysis showed that toxic emissions will not exceed a cancer risk of one in one million, and will therefore not be significant. None of the Project components is expected to have significant odor impacts, but previ- ous analysis of sludge handling facilities has shown that there may be significant. - odor problems associated with increased sludge production. ivoise (Refer to Chapter 4.13 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) All of the alternatives except the Laguna Discharge option will have significant temporary noise impacts associated with construction of pipelines, pump stations, and/or reservoirs. Noise from construe tion'traffic, although temporary, will also be significant for the South County, West County, Geysers, and Russian River Discharge alternatives. Pump, stations associated with the South County, West County, and Geysers alter- natives will all have .significant long- term operational impacts. Although mit- igation will reduce noise levels, the JULY 31, 1996 L_,T _ W—e-wa Pr �— DRAFT EIR/EIS increase in noise levels in rural areas will still be perceptible, and will be an unavoidable adverse impact. Visual Resources (Refer to Chapter 4.14 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) Project impacts on visual resources were evaluated based upon the changes in views from public viewpoints (such as scenic corridors, designated scenic land- scape units, roadways, parks, or recre- ation areas) up to three miles away, and from private residences up to 2,000 feet away. Significant impacts will occur along pipeline routes because of the strong visual contrast resulting from the disturbance of the landscape edge from grading and removal of vegetation. Significant impacts occur at the reservoir sites due to one or more of the following.- 1) ollowing:1) strong contrast of the dam face with the surrounding landscape; 2) obstruc- tion by the dam face of focal views of ridgelines and valleys; and 3) displace- ment of mature stands of trees.' The pump stations will also have potential visual impacts due to their contrast with surrounding agricultural and rural environments, particularly in foreground views. These impacts will affect both public viewpoints and private residences. Mitigation reduces the impacts related to visual contrast. However, there is no mitigation available for pennanent view obstruction or displacement of mature stands of trees. Facilities at the Geysers, irrigation, and the discharge outfall on the Russian River will not result in significant visual impacts. 1-39 Table 1-8. Tolay and Two Rock reservoir sites have especially valuable cultural resources. Cultural resources and Paleontology (Refer to Chapter 4.15 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) Project impacts to cultural resources were evaluated by establishing known resources on affected properties and estimating unknown resources (potentially existing but not yet discovered), through a sensitivity analysis for the agricultural irrigation areas. A records search was conducted for all affected properties, and a complete field survey was con- ducted for the storage reservoir sites. The study area is rich in cultural resources of various kinds; only the Laguna Discharge Alternative avoids impacts because it involves no construc- tion. Types of resources found include prehistoric and historic archaeological sites, architectural historical sites and settings, and historic landscapes. See Table 1-8 which displays the number of known sites for each alternative. Mitigation consists of construction mon - itoring, avoidance, documentation, eval- uation, relocation, and/or education, as Known Cultural Resources Impacted 1 - No Action Alternative 0 2A - Tolay Extended 248 2B - Adobe [Lakeville 247 2C - Tolay Confined 235 2D - Sears Point/Lakeville 245 3A - Two Rock 232 3B - Bloomfield 203 3C - Carroll Road 197 3D - Valley Ford 191 3E - Huntley 196 4 - Geysers Recharge 52 5A - Russian River Discharge 2 5B - Laguna Discharge 0 appropriate. Although some resources, such as those at Tolay and Two Rock reservoir sites are extensive, and mitiga- tion would be time consuming,. all .impacts will be mitigated to a level below significance. The paleontology section analyzes the potential disturbance of unknown verte- brate paleontologic (fossil) resources. This analysis was based on review of pertinent geologic mapping and known locations of potential fossil -bearing rock units. These rock units are found throughout the study area, resulting in potentially significant impacts for all alternatives, except the Laguna Discharge Alternative, which does not involve any construction. Proposed miti- gation includes construction monitoring for vertebrate paleontologic resources, salvage, evaluation, and education, as appropriate, and will reduce impacts to a level below significance. Public Services, Utilities, and recreation (Refer to Chapter 4.16 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) No significant impacts are identified for public services, except for the No Action Alternative. If the Project is not implemented, the City will not be able to supply sewage treatment and disposal in accordance with its General Plan and the existing lack of reliable capacity would continue. This is considered a significant impact. Energy (Refer to Chapter 4.17 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) Energy will be used to pump reclaimed water for all alternatives except the 1-40 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY Laguna Discharge Alternative. However, none of the alternatives has significant energy impacts. The Geysers project will generate more energy than will be used for pumping. Socioeconomics (Refer to Chapter 4.18 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) Several dwelling units will be lost due to construction of the storage reservoirs; this loss is considered a significant housing impact. A significant service charge increase, (see Table 1-9) for sewage treatment would occur for users throughout the Subregional System if the South or West County Reclamation Alternatives or the Geysers Recharge Alternative. is imple- mented. No feasible mitigation has been identified. Demand fees (hookup fees) will also increase substantially for these same alternatives (see Table 1-10). Due to provision of irrigation, the South and West County Reclamation Altema- tives will increase the gross value of all fruit, vegetable, wine grape, and forage crops as shown in Table 1-11. Sebastopol irrigation will add even more to the value of crops, if most apple growers switched to the higher yielding new dwarf and semi -dwarf apple varieties. The value of increased local dairy forage production will :go beyond the gross crop values shown in this analysis if the ability to grow local forage and pasture ensures the long-term survival of the dairy industry in Sonoma and northern Marin counties. - � S brcgior�ol Long -T r... Wace­P,—j--. DRAFT E I R/ E I S Table 1-9. Estimate of Maximum Additional Service Charge. Average Monthly Service Charge per Single Family Residence I No Action (No Project) 0 2A So. Co.—Tolay Extended $33.90 2B So. Co.—Adobe/Lakeville $34.30 2C So. Co.—Tolay Confined $36.70 2D So. Co.—Lakeville/Sears Point $42.40 3A W. Co.—Two Rock $23.70 3B W. Co.—Bloomfield $25.70 3C W. Co.—Carroll Road $24.60 31) W. Co.—Valley Road $2520 3E W. Co.—Huntley $24.50 4 Geysers Recharge $74.40 5A Russian River Discharge $2.20 5B Laguna Discharge $0.70 Table 1-10. Estimate of Additional Demand Fee Demand Fee per Single Family Residence or Equivalent I No Action (No Project) ($3,700) 2A So. Co.—Tolay Extended $7,300 2B So. Co.—Adobe/Lakeville $8,600 2C So. Co.—Tolay Confined $8,700 2D So. Co.—Lakeville/Sears Point $9,400 3A W. Co.—Two Rock $5,100 3B W. Co.—Bloomfield $6,300 3C W. Co.—Carroll Road $5,000 3D W. Co.—Valley Ford $5,300 3E W. Co.—Huntley $5,400 4 Geysers Recharge $3,900 5A Russian River Discharge ($1,800) 5B Laguna Discharge ($2,400) Amounts in parentheses indicate a reduction in demand fee. JULY 31, 1996 1-41 Annual Gross Production Value oT Irrigated Crops (thousands of dollars) Low Tech Medium Tech High Tech Scenario Scenario Scenario WestCounty$ 3,100 $20,400 $ 71,900 West County w/Sebastopol $52,800 $65,500 $102,400 South County $ 2,600 $18,000 $35.000 Sounth County w/Sebastopol $53.400 $65,100 $ 82,200 Table 1-11. Irrigation water will greatly increase the value of fruit, vegetable, pasture, and forage crops. Table 1-12. Annual Net Economic Impacts Total Impact Employment (1,o00s) 1 No Action (No Project) ($1,482,900) (27,100) 2A So. Co.—Tolay Extended $120,100 3,500 2B So. Co.—Adobe/Lakeville $119,000 3,500 2C So. Co.—Tolay Confined $117,600 3,500 2D So. Co.—Lakeville/Sears Point $115,100 3,400 3A W. Co.—Two Rock $124,300 3,600 3B W. Co.—Bloomfield $122,900 3,600 3C W. Co.—Carroll Road $123,900 3,600 3D W. Co.—Valley Road $123,500 3,600 3E W. Co.—Huntley $123,800 3,600 4 Geysers Recharge ($38,000) (1,100) 5A Russian River Discharge ($1,600) 0 5B Laguna Discharge ($600) 0 Amounts in parentheses indicate an adverse impact. If the current dairy price support system remains in place, the two factors that most threaten the dairy industry in the North Bay are: the cost of feed and urban pressures that increase the price of agricultural land and opportunities for urban/agricultural conflicts. The avail- ability of reclaimed water to dairy farmers will substantially reduce the cost of imported feeds and improve long -teen viability of the dairy industry. NVhen the economic effects of increased agricultural value, increased expendi- tures for ongoing operations and mainte- nance, and impacts of increased service charges and demand fees are considered, the Reclamation Alternatives will gener- ate annual net economic benefits of $115 to $124 million in the Sonoma and Marin county economies, including up to 3,600 new jobs (see Table 1-12). The Geysers Alternative is projected to have the largest cost due to the high operation and maintenance costs. These costs will be partially offset by the payments by the Geysers operators for reclaimed water as well as the additional property tax revenue and royalty payments that would accrue to Sonoma County. No offers have yet been made by the Geysers operators, so this analysis does not reflect the net economic benefit to be derived from this alternative. The Geysers Recharge and Discharge alternatives generate very little econom- ic benefit to the region, but still generate costs. Most of the economic benefit of the Geysers Recharge Alternative goes outside the Sonoma and Marin economies. The socio-economic analysis 1-42 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY shows that impacts on Russian River tourism of increased discharge are primarily dependent upon publicity regarding the discharge, rather than the discharge itself, and are therefore unpredictable. If the Project is not implemented, that is, the No Action Alternative is chosen, it is likely that the North Coast Regional Water Quality Control Board will prevent further sewage hookups after December 1997, thereby creating a building moratorium. The economic analysis indicates that some 27,100 future jobs and 28,200 future housing units will be lost. Overall, the economic impact of the No Action Alternative will be greater than a loss of future jobs and houses; the income growth of existing residents and workers will be adversely impacted, as well. Inundation Due to Dam Failure (Refer to Chapter 4.19 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) The potential for dam failure caused by a seismic event, unstable slope condi- tions, or damage from corrosive or expansive soils is extremely remote. The California Department of Water Resources, Division of Safety of Dams is the regulatory agency with jurisdic- tion over the design, constriction, and operation of dams in California to prevent failure and to safeguard life and protect property. California currently has the most stringent dam safety design and construction review standards in the country, and adherence to these standards greatly reduces the probability of darn failure and is protective of public safety. Since the Division of Safety of Dams was established, three notable dam failures JULY 31, 1996 �S bragGor�a1 Lo.,g-Ter... Waseo...aeor Pr j®oe D R A F T E I R/ E I S have occurred in Califor-nia, and only one (Baldwin Hills Reser-voir in 1963) resulted in loss of life.' Subsequent to die San Fernando earth- quake of 1971, where the Lower Van Norman Dam was damaged, but did not fail, a seismic inspection and rehabilita- tion program was instituted. During the Loma Prieta earthquake, several dams were damaged, but no uncontrolled releases of water occurred. Current standards for dam constriction are even more strict than the standards for any of the dams that have failed. The dam and reservoir design will virtu- ally eliminate the possibility of failure by the major causes of dam failure. Overtopping will be preempted because dams will be sited in small tributary watersheds and spillways will be sized to accommodate the probable maxpnum flood. The possibility of foundation failure will be greatly reduced by construction on a bedrock foundation and installation of an internal drainage system. During operation, the reservoirs will be visually inspected on a regular basis to ensure that the embankments, control struc- tures, access roads, and monitoring instrumentation are maintained. All impediments will be removed from the spillway and other control structures as soon as they are observed. In the highly unlikely event of a cata- strophic dam failure, all reservoirs have housing or facilities within their projected inundation area, which will be flooded and/or destroyed. 1-43 Subreglonal Long -Term Wastewater Project DRAFT .E IR/EIS Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation, No tion I South County Irri ation I West County Irrigation I Geysers I Dischar e 1 1 2A I 2B I 2C I 2D I 3A I 3B I 3C I 3D I 3E 1 4 1 5A I 5B I Mitioation Measures T.,ind TtsP 1-4 4 1.5.3. The storage reservoir component may be an O O • O ® O O O O ® 2.4.1. Removal of aggregate resources incompatible land use type in a designated quarry area. prior to construction. 1.6.T The pump station component may convert public ® p 2.3.1. Replacement of open space open space for project facilities. easements. AsrrirulfilrP 2:5.1. The storage reservoir component may cause loss O O • O ® O O O O ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. of farmland. 2.3.7. Slope Monitoring and Response 2.5.2. The storage reservoir component may cause ® p No feasible mitigation has been identified. Williamson Act contracts to be canceled. 2.3.8. Earthquake Preparedness and . 2.6.1. The pump station component may cause loss of • 0 ® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. farmland. 0 i ® ® 0 ® (D ® ® 2.3.8. Earthquake Preparedness and 2.7.3. The agricultural irrigation component may reduce O O O O E) O O O O 2.3.2 Restrict approval of agricultural agricultural soil productivity due to erosion of topsoil. irrigation contracts. 2.3.3. Agricultural Irrigation Demonstration Program (,Pnjnov_ CnItQ. and CPicmirity 3.4.1. The pipeline component .may be located within O O E) O E) O O O O ® 2.3.4. Slope Stabilization Design an area of unstable slope conditions. 2.3.7. Slope Monitoring and Response System 2.3.8. Earthquake Preparedness and . Emergency Response Plan 3.4.2. The pipeline component may be subject to 0 i ® ® 0 ® (D ® ® 2.3.8. Earthquake Preparedness and ground rupture due to location near the surface trace of Emergency Response Plan an active fault. Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation JULY 31, 1996 1-45 No Action South County Irrigation West County Irrigation Geysers Discharge 1 2A 213 2C 2D 3A 3B 3C I 3D 3E 4 5A 5B Impact Mitigation Measures 3.4.3. The pipeline component may be located in areas O O O O O O O O O O O 2.3.5. Liquefaction Stabilization Design with soils and groundwater conditions that are susceptible to liquefaction during an earthquake. 3.4.7. The pipeline component may be exposed to O O O O O O O I O O 1 O 12.4.1. Standard Engineering Methods for damage due to expansive soils. Expansive Soils 3.4.8. The pipeline component may be exposed to O O O O 2.3.6. Standard Engineering Methods for damage due to corrosive soils. Corrosive Soils 3.5.1. The storage reservoir component may be located ® 40 ® ® 2.3.4. Slope Stabilization Design within an area of unstable slope conditions. 2.4.2. Remove weak surficial deposits from reservoir foot rint. 3.5.7. The storage reservoir component may be exposed O O O O 2.4.2. Remove weak surficial deposits to damage due to expansive soils. from reservoir footprints. 2.4.3. Standard Engineering Methods for Expansive Soils 3.6.3. The pump stations component may be located in O O O O O O O O O O 2.3.5. Liquefaction Stabilization Design areas with soils and groundwater conditions that are susceptible to liquefaction during an earthquake. 3.6.7. The pump stations component may be exposed to O O O O O O O O O O 2.4.3. Standard Engineering Methods for lExpansive damage due to expansive soils. Soils 3.7.8. The agricultural irrigation component may be O 0 O 2.3.6. Standard Engineering Methods for exposed to damage due to corrosive soils. Bay flats and Corrosive Soils Lakeville irrigation areas. 3.8.1 The geysers steanifield component may be located O 2.3.4 Slope Stabilization Design in an area of unstable slope conditions JULY 31, 1996 1-45 Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project DRAFT EIR/EIS Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation fE114 No Action South County Irriciation West County 11 riciation Geysers Dischar e Im act 1 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 3B I 3C I 3D 3E 4 5A 5B Mitigation Measures 3.9.3. The discharge component may be located in areas O 2.3.5. Liquefaction Stabilization Design With soils and groundwater conditions that are susceptible to liquefaction during an earthquake. Cnrr�rP WatPr-1Rvrlrnlnvv 4.4C The Project plus cumulative projects may cause O O O O O O O O O O O O O 2.5.10. Discharge prohibition during a'cumulative increase in the maximum flood elevation flood state is proposed to mitigate for the in the Russian River. project's contribution to a flooding " O O O O O O O O O 1111 act. r�elrel�!lrrrRrts@M 5.5.1. The storage reservoir component may degrade O O O O O O O O O 2.3.12. Provide replacement hater supple groundwater quality at existing wells, resulting in public for affected wells. health Hazards. 5.5.2. The storage reservoir component may degrade O O O O O O O O O 2.3.12. Provide replacement water supple groundwater quality at future drinking water wells, for affected wells. resulting in a public health hazard. 5.5.3. The storage reservoir component may cause O G O O 2.5.9. Implement a septic system groundwater`mounding.or increase_ groundwater levels monitoring and replacement program. that cause surface discharge in a non -stream enviromnent. 5.5.4. The storage reservoir component may lower O O O O O O O 2.3.13. Monitor groundwater levels and groundwater levels at existing wells. provide replacement water supply. 5.5.5. The storage. reservoir component may lower O O O E) 0 O (D O O 2.3.13. Monitor groundwater levels and groundwater levels in areas that could have been provide replacement water supply. developed for future water supply. _.. - �_., - +_- '�p�'v"'"�. acw' K i�'n'tit,� '+�§ "� _. i 1' l.a 4 r 9s' � '.;yt+' � >"-�+s�, Old n:.•. .. fir. , _ - . A gnp - 5. *�'�".%� w �'. n� (��•i� :P fM+'�1 fd,..£ '1 :t. � .. � - 1 -'` �.:.r.�: ._ nth ,' ' ., t. _�*. r''.`-'�.,. Vis- •.tt�€�...��F�Y'�l c��2�t',w..a..: �.�11.. �a.., i-e� u..��=.�i?,.'3.�..�"�1.n:h,.�,N.�t$:..bs,�sz.. ,�. ci..i::,:d;... _ ...,.�#r, Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation No [Action Impact 1 Qn form Wo4ar iin ority South County Irrigation I West Count Irrigation . Ge sers Dischar e 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 1'36 3C 3D I 3E 1 4 1 5A 1513 Mitigation Measures 6.5.1. Ammonia. The storage reservoir component may O O O O O O O .O 2.5.3 Control program for hydrogen cause numeric -based criteria to be exceeded. sulfide, ammonia. and dissolved oxygen. 6.x.1. Dissolved oxygen. The storage reservoir O O O O O O O O 2.5.3 Control program for hydrogen component may cause numeric -based criteria to be sulfide, ammonia, and dissolved oxygen. exceeded. 6.5.1. Hydrogen sulfide. The storage reservoir O O O O O O O O 2.5.3 Control 'prograrn for hydrogen component may cause numeric -based criteria to be sulfide, ammonia, and dissolved oxygen. exceeded. 6.5.3. Salinity; ammonia, dissolved oxygen, planktonic O ® ® ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. algae, benthic algae, and metals. The storage reservoir component may cause special -site_ criteria to be exceeded. 6.7.1. Dissolved copper. Agricultural irrigationmayO O O O O 2.5,2 Control program for dissolved cause numeric -based criteria to be exceeded. copper levels in West County creeks. 6.7.3. Salinity, ammonia; dissolved oxygen, planktonic ® ® 0 ® ® No feasible nutigation has been identified. algae, benthic algae, and metals. The agricultural irrigation may cause the special site criterion to be exceeded. 6.9.1. Conductivity. Discharge component may cause ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. numeric -based criteria to be exceeded. 6.9.1. Cyanide. Discharge component may cause ® E) 2.5.5. Cyanide Monitoring and Source numeric -based criteria to be exceeded. Control Program 6.9.1. Dissolved oxygen. Discharge component inay ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. cause numeric-based`criteria to be exceeded. JULY 31, 1996 1 -4 7 P. DRAFT EIR/EIS Subreglonal Long -Term Wastewater Project Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation 1 -4 8 Pnhl;e Analth anti Cafvti 7.4.2. The pipeline component may be constructed on or No O O O O O O Action South County Irri ation West County Irrigation Geysers Discharcle 1 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 3B 3C 3D . 3E 4 5A 5B Impact Mitigation Measures 6.9.2. Algal growth. Design discharge component may 0® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® O 2.5.4 Discharge Operations cause narrative -based criteria to be exceeded. public to chemical, radionuclides, or pathogens at 6.9.2. Algal'growth (beneficial) Discharge scenarios + + + + + + + + + + + + + None required. may cause narrative -based criteria to be, exceeded., ; 7.5.6. The storage reservoir component may increase. O O O O O O O O 6.9:2. Turbidity. Discharge scenarios may cause the potential exposure of the public to disease vectors. ;(D ® ® 2.5.4 Discharge Operations narrative -based criteria to be exceeded. 7.6.2. The pump station component may be constructed Q O O O E) (D O O E) 6.9.2. Turbidity. (beneficial). Discharge scenarios may ® O None required. cause narrative -based criteria.to be exceeded. 6.9.2. Waste. Reduction. Strategy - Ammonia -Nitrogen. 0 O 2.5.6 Total and Anunonia Nitrogen Source Discharge scenarios may cause narrative -based criteria Control Program to be exceeded. 6.9.2, Wasie Reduction Strategy - Total Nitrogen: ! O 25.6 Total and Ammonia Nitrogen Source Discharge scenarios may cause narrative -based criteria Control Program to be exceeded. 6.9.2. Toxicity: Discharge'component may cause ® O 25.7. Toxicity Control Program narrative -based criteria to be exceeded. Pnhl;e Analth anti Cafvti 7.4.2. The pipeline component may be constructed on or O O O O O O O O O O 2.3.15. Construction Management within a known hazardous waste site. Program 7.5.1. The storage reservoir component may expose the E O O O O O O O O 2.3.12. Provide replacement water supply public to chemical, radionuclides, or pathogens at for affected wells. concentrations detrimental to human health. 7.5.6. The storage reservoir component may increase. O O O O O O O O 2.3.16. Mosquito Prevention Program the potential exposure of the public to disease vectors. ;(D 7.6.2. The pump station component may be constructed Q O O O E) (D O O E) 2.3.45. Construction Management on or within a known hazardous waste site.. - Pro ram Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation T.. ..a....,1 D'..1 1 D" 8:5.3. Storage reservoir component may cause loss of No O E) O O _ O Action South County Irriciation West County Irri ation Geysers Discharge 1 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 4 5A 5B Impact Mitigation Measures 7.7.2. The agricultural- irrigation component may 8.5.5. Storage reservoir component may cause loss of O O O O O O O O O O 2.3.15. Construction Management expose workers or the public to hazards from a known sensitive native terrestrial plant communities. Program hazardous waste site. 89.5. Discharge component may cause permanent loss O 7.8.2. The geysers steanlfield component may expose of sensitive native terrestrial plant communities O 2.3: 15. Constriction Management workers or the public to hazards from a known 8.2C. The Project plus cumulative projects may cause a O O Program hazardous waste site. loss of individuals of CNSPS List 2, 3, or 4 terrestrial T.. ..a....,1 D'..1 1 D" 8:5.3. Storage reservoir component may cause loss of O E) O O O O O O O 2.4.5. Active Raptor Nest Location and active raptor nest sites. Momtoring Program 8.5.5. Storage reservoir component may cause loss of O O O O O O O O O 2.3.11. Sensitive Resource Conservation sensitive native terrestrial plant communities. Program 89.5. Discharge component may cause permanent loss O 2.3.11. Sensitive Resource Conservation of sensitive native terrestrial plant communities Program 8.2C. The Project plus cumulative projects may cause a O O 2.4.15, Sensitive Plant Translocation loss of individuals of CNSPS List 2, 3, or 4 terrestrial Program plant species. 8.4C. The Project plus cumulative projects may cause ® ® A ® ® ® ® ® ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. permanent loss of sensitive terrestrial wildlife habitat. 8.7C. The Project plus cumulative projects may result 0 O O O O O O. O O O G O 2.4.16. Ecological Risk Monitoring and in ecological risk to terrestrial plant and wildlife Source Control Program populations (i.e., acute or chronic toxicity and bioaccumulation). JULY 31, 1996 1-49 ��-�'Subreglonal Long -Term Wastewater Project DRAFT EIR/EIS Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation No Action South County Irrigation West County Irrigation Geysers Discharge Impact 1 2A I 2B 2C 2D 3A I 3B I 3G I 3D I 3E 4 SA I 5B Mitigation Measures Annatir Rialnuiral Recnnrrrs 1 -50 9.5.1. The storage reservoir component may cause loss E) G, O O 0 O O O 2.3.11. Sensitive Resource Conservation of individuals or occupied habitat of endangered; Program threatened, or rare aquatic wildlife or plant species. 2,4.4. California Red -legged Frog Capture and Relocation Program 9.5.3. The storage reservoir component may cause loss O O 2.3.11. Sensitive Resource Conservation of potential or occupied habitat of aquatic species of Program concern. 9.5.4. The storage reservoir component may cause O 2.3.11. Sensitive Resource Conservation permanent loss of sensitive aquatic plant communities Program and associated wildlife habitats. 9.5.5. The storage reservoir component may cause O O O O O 2.3.11. Sensitive Resource Conservation permanent loss of aquatic habitat. Program 9.5.6. The storage reservoir component may cause a ® ® a Q ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. change in th&physical condition of aquatic habitat in the Estero American or the Estero de San Antonio within the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. 9.5.8. The storage reservoir component may cause a 0 O O O O O O tio 2.3.11. Sc►lsitive Resource Conservan change in stream flows; affecting aquatic habitat orProgram: aquatic life downstream from proposed dam sites. 9.7.6. The storage reservoir component may cause a ® ® ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. change in the physical condition of aquatic habitat in the Estero American or the Estero de San Antonio within the Gulf of the Farallones National Marine Sanctuary. 9.2C. The cumulative projects may cause a loss of O 12.4.15. Sensitive Plant Relocation individuals of CNPS List 2, 3, or 4 aquatic plant s cies. Program Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation Impact No Action South County Irri ation West County Irri ation Geysers Dischar e Mitigation Measures 1 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 3B I 3C 3D I 3E 4 5A I 5B 9.9C. The Project plus cumulative projects may result O . 10.5.1. The storage reservoir component may destroy O O 2.4.16. Ecological Risk Monitoring and in ecological risk to aquatic plant and wildlife O G) I G) I O O 2.3.11 Sensitive Resource Conservation wetlands or other waters of the U.S.. • ® Source Control Program populations (i.e., acute or chronic toxicity and ® ® a ® ® 0 a Program 10.9.1. The discharge component may destroy bioaccumulation). O 2.3.11 Sensitive Resource Conservation. wetlands or other waters of the U.S. J LL l lJUal, aiV aaaa 10.4:1. The pipeline component may destroy wetlands E) 1 O O O 1 O (D I G) I O E) I O O 2.3.10 Limit Construction Disturbance or other waters of the U.S. . 10.5.1. The storage reservoir component may destroy O 0.0 O O G) I G) I O O 2.3.11 Sensitive Resource Conservation wetlands or other waters of the U.S.. • ® e ® ® ® a ® ® 0 a Program 10.9.1. The discharge component may destroy O 2.3.11 Sensitive Resource Conservation. wetlands or other waters of the U.S. Program lir 11 ttriS 7Va lata VU 11.4.1. Traffic from constriction or operations of the • ® a ® ® a m a a ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. pipeline component may cause congestion along access roads 11.4.2. Lane closures due to constriction of the pipeline • ® e ® ® ® a ® ® 0 a No feasible mitigation has been identified. component may delay traffic, delay transit services, restrict access. increase hazards, and reroute traffic, including emergency velucles. 11.4.4. The pipeline component may cause damage to ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. public or private roadbeds. 11.5.1. Traffic from construction or operation of the • • ® ® 0 ® ® ® a No feasible mitigation has been identified. storage reservoir component may cause congestion on access roads. JULY 31, 1996 1-51 I J Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project DRAFT EIR/EIS 1 -5 2 Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation impact No Action South County Irri ation West County Irri ation Geysers Dischar e Mitigation Measures 1 2A I 2B 2C 12D 3A I 3B I 3C 3D 3E 4 SA 5B 11.8.1. Traffic from construction of the geysers determined perchloroethylene levels will 13.4.3. Construction of the pipeline component may ® ® ® No feasible nitigation has been identified. steanifield component may cause congestion on access ® 0 ® ® Q ® ® be less than significant. 12.2.5. The headw_orks expansion component may cause A ® roads. ® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. odors. O S O Air nnality - 12.2.3. The headworks expansion component may O O O O O O O O O O O O A screening level health risk assessment exceed trigger toxic emissions levels. determined perchloroethylene levels will 13.4.3. Construction of the pipeline component may ® ® ® ® ® 0 ® ® Q ® ® be less than significant. 12.2.5. The headw_orks expansion component may cause A ® A ® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. odors. O S O ® ® ® 2.4.9. Construction Noise Control 12.4.1. The pipeline component may exceed emission ® ® ® ® O O CO O O O 2.=x.1 "Dust Control Program threshold levels. 2.4.10 Vehicle and Equipment Exhaust Control Pro gram 12.5.1. The storage reservoir component may exceed ® ® ® ® ® 0 ® ® 0 2.4. 10 Vehicle and Equipment Exhaust emission threshold levels. Control Program 2.4.11 Dust Control Program 12.8.1. The geysers steamfield component may exceed ® 1 1 2.4.10 Vehicle and Equipment Exhaust emission threshold levels. Control Program Nniw- 13.4.1. Construction of pipeline component may expose ® ® ® ® ® O 0 ® @ ® 12.4.9. Construction Noise Control the public to high noise levels. Measures 13.4.3. Construction of the pipeline component may ® ® ® ® ® 0 ® ® Q ® ® 12.4.9.- Construction Noise Control cause high noise levels from the construction traffic. Measures 13.5.1. Construction of the storage reservoir component O S O ® ® ® 2.4.9. Construction Noise Control may expose the public to high noise levels. Measures . � - ,., -, • . � . , - .. .., '.; s u :,... �. .,.;: .,.w.zr - ..i,� i r � sup r �s,�x,m"t a-,+r.,cx - X13 .:,y ■„�b,'�,lul�4 :�,� 2w• i '4Y...'7 al t. x.a^ t 9'�i�3 4.. rEt :' '§ .'fir: •ti P'4Y .a .» 'i.• ,�: - e: ,;^� 7 Y+.. -�.�•'�xn�n..tr. .a. ....§r Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation JULY 31, 1996 1-53 No Action South County Irriciation West County Irri ation Geysers Discharge 1 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 4 5A 513 Impact Mitigation Measures 13.5.3. Construction of the storage reservoir component. • ® • ® ® ® ® 8 0 2.4.9. Constniction Noise Control may cause high noise levels from the construction Measures traffic. 13.6.1. Construction of the pump station component ® 0 ® ® ® ® 0 (D 0 ® 2.4.9. Constriction Noise Control may expose the public to high noise levels. Measures 13.6.2. Operation of the pump station component may ® ® ® ® ® ® 0 ® ® a 2.3.17. Incorporate noise control expose the public to high noise levels. measures into the final design of the pump station. 13.7.1. Construction of the agricultural irrigation • • ® ® ® ® ® ® 2.4,9. Constriction Noise Control component may ex ose.the public to high noise levels. Measures 13.8.3. Construction of the Geysers stealnfield Q No feasible mitigation has been identified. component may cause high noise levels from construction traffic. Visual Resources 14.4.1. The pipeline component may be inconsistent O 0 O O 0 O O O O O 2.3.10. Limit constriction disturbance. with the Sonoma County General Plan Open Space Element regarding Community Separator Areas. 14.4.2. The pipeline component may be inconsistent 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.3,9. Adjust pipeline aligmnents. . with the Sonoma County General Plan Open Space 2.3.10. Limit constriction disturbance. Element regarding Scenic Landscape Units. 14.4.3. The pipeline component may be inconsistent 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 2.3.9. Adjust pipeline aligmnents. with the Sonoma County or city General Plans 2.3.10. Limit construction disturbance. regarding designated Scenic Corridors. JULY 31, 1996 1-53 � � SZreglonal Long -Term Wastewater Project DRAFT EIR/EIS Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation 1 -5 4 No Action South County Irriciation West County Irri ation Geysers Discharcie 1 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 4 5A 56 Impact Mitigation Measures 14.4.5. The pipeline component may cause adverse O O O O O O O O O ® O .2.3.9. Adjust pipeline aligmnents. effects on foreground or middleground views from a 2.3.10. Limit constriction disturbance. high volume travelway, recreation use area, or other public use area. 14.4.6.. The pipeline component may cause an adverse O O O O O O O O O O O 2.3.9. Adjust pipeline aligmnents. effect on foreground or middleground views from one or 2.3.10. Limit construction disturbance. more private residence. 14.5,2. The storage reservoir component may be 2.4.6. Screen concrete diversion channels, inconsistent with the Sonoma County General Plan Open pump stations, and other facilities. Space Element regarding Scenic Landscape Units. 2.4.7. Establish tree screening. 2.4.8. Reve Jetate face of reservoir dam. 14.5.3. The storage reservoir component may be ® ® ® 2.4.6. Screen concrete diversion channels. inconsistent with the County Open Space Element pump stations, and other facilities. regarding Scenic Corridors. 2.4.7. Establish tree screening. 2.4.8. Reve elate face of reservoir dam. 14.5.5. The storage reservoir component may. cause O ® O O 2.4.6. Screen concrete diversion channels, adverse effects on foreground or middleground views pump stations, and other facilities. . from a high volume travelway, recreation use area, of 2.4.7. Establish tree screening. other public use area. 2.4.8. Reve gelate face of reservoir dam. 14.5.6. The Storage reservoir component may cause an • O ®. ® ® ® ® G O 2.4.6. Screen concrete diversion channels, adverse effect on foreground or middleground views pump stations, and other facilities. from one_ or more private residences. 2.4.7. Establish tree screening. 2.4.8. Reve etate face of reservoir dam. 14.6.2. The pump station component may be O O O O O O O O O ® 2.4.6. Screen concrete diversion channels. inconsistent with the Sonoma County General Plan Open primp stations, and other facilities. Space Element regarding Scenic Landscape Units. ; .z Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation !`.. 14 1 1? " rr • d Polnnntnlnay. 15.4.1. The pipeline component may disturb known No O O O O O O Action South County Irrigation West County Irrigation Geysers Dischar e 1 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 4 5A 5B Impact Mitigation Measures 14.6.3. The pump station component may be including archaeological, historical, architectural, and i 0 ® ® ® ® ® ® 2,4.6. Screen concrete diversion channels, inconsistent with the County Open Space Element Native American/traditional heritage resources. pump stations, and other facilities. regarding Scenic Corridors. 15.4.2. The pipeline component may disturb unknown O O O O O O O O O O O 14.6.4. The pump station component may be archaeological resources. • A I ® • ® 0 ® ® I 2.4.6. Screen concrete diversion channels, inconsistent with minimum building setbacks for 15.4.3. The pipeline component may disturb unknown O 1 0 1 0 0 O O O O O O O pump stations, and other facilities. strictures along Sonoma County designated scenic vertebrate paleontologic resources. corridors. 14.6.5. The pump station component may cause adverse ® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® 2.4.6. Screen concrete diversion channels; effects on foreground or middleground views from a pump stations, and other facilities. high volume travelway, recreation use area, or other public use area. 14.6.6. The pump station component may cause an ® • ® ® ® ® ® ® a ® 2.4.6. Screen concrete diversion channels, adverse effect on foreground or nliddleground views pump stations, and other facilities. from one or more private residences. !`.. 14 1 1? " rr • d Polnnntnlnay. 15.4.1. The pipeline component may disturb known O O O O O O O O O O O 2.3.18. Identification, evaluation, and potentially eligible National Register properties, avoidance of cultural resources. including archaeological, historical, architectural, and Native American/traditional heritage resources. 15.4.2. The pipeline component may disturb unknown O O O O O O O O O O O 2.4.12. Protect undiscovered cultural archaeological resources. I I I I I I resource sites. 15.4.3. The pipeline component may disturb unknown O 1 0 1 0 0 O O O O O O O 12.4.13 Protect vertebrate paleontologic vertebrate paleontologic resources. resources. JULY 31, 1996 1-55 Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project DRAFT EIR/ElS Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation t -56 No Action South County Irrigation West County Irrigation Geysers Discharge 1 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 4 5A 5B. Im`act Mitigation Measures 15.5.1. The storage reservoir component may disturb O - O O O 0 0 0 O O 2.3.18. Identification, evaluation, and known potentially eligible National Register properties; avoidance of cultural resources. including archaeological, - historical, architectural, and Native American/traditional heritage resources. 15.5.2. The storage reservoir component may disturb O O O O (D O O O O 2.4.12. Protect undiscovered_ cultural unknown archaeological resources. resource sites. 15.5.3. The storage reservoir component may disturb O O O O O O O O O 2.4.13. Protect vertebrate paleontologic unknown vertebrate paleont6logic resources. resources. 15.6.1. The pump station component may disturb known 0 O O O O O O O O O 2.3.18. Identification; evaluation, and potentially eligible National Register. properties, avoidance of cultural resources. including archaeological, historical, architectural, and Native American/traditional heritage resources. 15.6.2. The pump station component may disturb O O . O O O (O O O O O 2.4.12. Protect undiscovered cultural unknown archaeological resources. resource sites. 15.6.3. The pump station component may disturb 0 O O O O O O O O 2.4.13. Protect vertebrate paleontologic unknown vertebrate paleontologic resources. resources. 15.7.1. The agricultural irrigation component may O O O O O O O O O 2.3.18. Identification, evaluation, and disturb known potentially eligible National Register avoidance of cultural resources. properties,, including archaeological, historical, architectural; and Native American/traditional heritage resources. 15.7.2. The agricultural irrigation component may O O O O O O O O O 2.4.12. Protect undiscovered cultural ,disturb unknown archaeological resources. resource sites. 15.7.3. The agricultural irrigation component may O O O O O O O O O 2.4.13. Protect vertebrate paleontologic disturb unknown vertebrate paleontologic resources. resources. Summary of Significant Impacts and Mitigation YUD11C Z5CMCC5 Ut1l1UC5 it11U 1%C1:1Ud UU 11 No ® Ole a ® 0 Action South County Irrigation West County Irrigation Geysers Disc har e 1 2A 2B 2C 2D 3A 3B 3C 3D 3E 4 5A 5B Impact Mitigation Measures 15.8.1. The geysers steamfield component may disturb demand for public services such that accepted service ® ® ® ® O 2.3.18. Identification; evaluation and known potentially eligible National Register properties, standards are not maintained. avoidance of cultural resources. including archaeological,.lustoriml, architectural, and 16.4.2. The pipeline component may public services ® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® Native Alnerican/traditional heritage resources. such that accepted service standards are not maintained. L A I I 1 15.8.2. The geysers stean>field component may disturb O 2.4.12. Protect undiscovered cultural unknown archaeological resources. resource sites. 15.9.2. The discharge component may disturb unknown O 2.4.12. Protect undiscovered cultural archaeological resources. resource sites. 15.9.3. The discharge component construction may O 2.4.13. Protect vertebrate paleontologic disturb unknown vertebrate paleontologic resources. resources. YUD11C Z5CMCC5 Ut1l1UC5 it11U 1%C1:1Ud UU 11 ® Ole a ® 0 ® Ole 0 None. 16.1.1. The No Action Alternative may increase ® demand for public services such that accepted service ® ® ® ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. standards are not maintained. 16.4.2. The pipeline component may public services ® ® ® ® ® ® ® ® 12.4.9. Constriction Noise Control. such that accepted service standards are not maintained. L A I I 1 2.4.14. Coordinate fire response service. Energy There are no significant impacts Joclo-economics 18.1. The Project may increase the service charge for ® Ole a ® 0 ® Ole 0 No feasible mitigation lids been identified. wastewater. 18.2. The Project may result in loss of homes due -to ® ® ® ® No feasible mitigation has been identified. constriction of facilities. Note: No mitigation is proposed for the significant impacts of the No Action Alternative. Alternatives: 1 -5 7 JULY 31, 1996 _ 1 Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project DRAFT EIR/EIS Level of Significance: 21) Sears Point/Lakeville Hillside Q Significant impact before mitigation-, less than significant impact after mitigation 3A Two Rock ® Significant impact before and after mitigation 3B Bloomfield + Beneficial impact 3C Carroll Road Alternatives: 31) Valley Ford 1 No Action (No Project) 3E Huntley 2A Tolay Extended 4 Geysers Recharge 2B Adobe Road/Lakeville Hillside 5A Discharge to Russian River 2C Tolay Confined 5B Discharge to the Laguna 1 -58 Table 1-14. Growth resulting from the Project is a fraction of the growth already expected in the healthy local economy. 1.10 NEPA/CEQA REQUIRED SECTIONS (Refer to Chapter 5 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) Growth -inducing Impacts (Refer to Chapter 5.3 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) Growth inducement is defined by the CEQA Guidelines as a project's potential for fostering of economic or population growth or the construction of new housing. Growth inducement may result from direct employment, population, or housing growth; secondary or indirect growth; or provision of new infrastructure which removes obstacles to growth. As shown in Table 1-14, the maximum contribution of any of tine Project alter- natives toward growth of employment, housing, or population is small compared to the total growth expected in Sonoma County over the life of tine Project. Therefore, none of the Project altema- tives is growth -inducing with regard to employment, housing, or population. The primary types of infrastructure which are potentially growth -inducing are roads, communication facilities, Growth -inducing Factors Maximum Contribution of a Project Alternative Expected Growth in Sonoma County over the Life of the Project Total employment 3,700 78,300 Housing units 2,400 25,900 Population 5,800 44,800 sewage treatment capacity, and water supply facilities. The Project alternatives do not include substantial improvements in either transportation or comnnunica- tions facilities. The new sewage treatment and disposal capacity supplied by this Project responds directly to the growth approved in each of the member juris- dictions' general plans. Capacity will increase from 18 mgd to 21 mgd aver- age dry weather flow. Experts disagree about the growth -inducing effect of such an expansion. Certainly, a primary obstacle to growth is being removed by provision of the increased capacity. However, tine Project is not the engine driving the growth. The healthy regional economy, local resources, and existing labor force, together with the desire of the population as expressed in the General Plans, are responsible for the economic growth of the region. From this perspective, the Project accommo- dates growth trends rather than inducing growth on its own. . One of the mitigation measures will supply new potable water to parcels downgradient of the storage reservoirs, if their groundwater is shown to be affected by the reservoir. At maximum, 84 parcels will receive a new water supply. All such parcels will have to be consistent with the Sonoma County General Plan and applicable zoning, therefore this secondary impact is growth -accommodating rather than growth -inducing. 1-58 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY Environmentally Superior Alternative (Refer to Chapter 5.5 of the Draft EIR/EIS.) The California Environmental Quality Act requires the identification of an Environmentally Superior Alternative; that is, the alternative which has no sig- nificant effect or has the least significant effect on the environment. For refer- ence, significance is determined based on substantial or potentially substantial adverse changes of any of the physical conditions due to the Project. The degree of change is�evaluated against existing environmental conditions. The environmentally superior alternative is Alternative 5B, the Laguna Discharge Alternative. This alternative causes the least change on the environment when compared with the other alternatives. This alternative does not impact wetlands and does not require the constriction of new facilities which change the existing environment. This alternative discharges reclaimed water to the Laguna de Santa Rosa which flows to the Russian River near the Sonoma County Water Agency water collection system. The unavoid- able effects of Laguna Discharge. include a further decrease of dissolved oxygen in the Laguna de'Santa Rosa and. an increase in biostimulatory substances, as'measured by benthic and planktonic algae, in the Laguna de Santa Rosa and Russian River. All but one of these unavoidable impacts occur in less than one month. every eight years. The unavoidable impact on benthic algae occurs in the lower-most quarter -mile reach of Santa Rosa Creek more frequently,, however beneficial impacts JULY 31, 1996 on algae will occur more frequently than adverse impacts. With implemen- tation of mitigation and cumulative projects (including nitrogen load reduction throughout the Laguna), Alternative 5B would have a less than significant impact. The No Action Alternative is similar to Alternative 5B. This alternative has greater water quality impacts, because it does not provide mitigation included in the other alternatives. The No Action. Alterative not only impacts biostimula- tory substances and dissolved oxygen similarly to the Laguna Discharge, but also causes exceedance of standards for cyanide and toxicity, and non -attainment of the Regional Board's Waste Reduction Strategy. The reclamation alternatives and the Geysers Alternative have fewer water quality impacts on the Russian River. However, these alternatives require physical changes to the existing environ- ment which cause significant and unavoidable effects on other resources. within Sonoma and Mann counties. Although Alternative 5B is considered environmentally superior (as defined above), any conclusion regarding the environmentally superior alternative should not be confused with an analysis of how each alternative may achieve the Project's purpose .and need. The Draft EIR/EIS has noted beneficial. effects of the alternatives, including increased prime farmland, generation of electricity, and economic stimulation. The City will consider and weigh these benefits and DRAFT EIR/EIS 1-59 it the environmental effects against the purpose and need of the project during the selection of the preferred Project. The National Environmental Policy Act requires the identification of the Environmentally Preferable Alternative from the range of alternatives consid- ered in the Record of Decision. The environmentally preferable alternative is the alternative that will promote the National Environmental policy as expressed In NEPA's Section 101. Ordinarily, this means the alternative that causes the least damage to the bio- logical and physical environment, it also means the alternative which best protects, preserves, and enhances historic, cultural, and natural resources. The environmentally preferable alternative also balances population and resources and enhances the quality of renewable resources. At this time the Corps has not selected the environmentally preferable alterna- tive, nor has the City selected its preferred alternative. After certification of the Final EIR, the City will consider and select the preferred alternative. At, that time, the Final EIS will be prepared which will identify both the environ- mentally preferable alternative and the preferred alternative. 1-60 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY 1.11 RANGE OF DISCHARGE EVALUATION (Refer to Appendix A, Volume 111 of the Draft EIR/EIS)) As a means of evaluating the range of design discharge rates between 1% and 20% of river flow, the Range of Discharge Evaluation Appendix focuses on impacts resulting from design discharge rates of 5%, 10%, and 15% in. relation to impacts from the 1% design discharge rate analyzed in the main body of the Draft EIR/EIS. Mese ultennediate rates represent benchmarks within the range of design discharge rates greater than 1% but less than 20%. All of the discharges would be directly. to the Laguna. Description of Project Alternatives for Intermediate Discharge Dates The average annual volume of,reclaimed water discharged to the Laguna under intermediate discharge options is shown in Table 1-15. Intermediate rates of discharge would reduce the 'requirement for reclaimed water storage and agricultural irrigation acreage by approximately 30 percent for a 5% discharge rate; 50 percent for a 10% discharge rate; and 75% for a 15% discharge rate. The reduction in storage requirements would mean .that smaller pipelines could. be built and smaller pumps could be provided at pump stations. With reductions in agricultural irrigation acreage, the length of pipeline and -number of pump stations, could also be reduced, although the actual reduc- tions cannot be detennined at this time JULY 31. 1996 � � 1 F-5.breg7or�a1 Lor,g-Ter... W­ce....e Pr �— D R A F T E I R / EIS because it is unknown which eligible properties will actually be irrigated. Consequently, the proposed irrigation acreage must be larger than theoretically required, and agricultural irrigation may occur in any of the irrigation areas. Based upon the reduced storage require- ments for the intermediate discharge rates, three altematives would be elimi- nated from consideration. Tile Tolay Expanded reservoir (Alternative 2A) would be eliminated under the 10% and 15% discharge options because the reservoir would be too shallow .to oper- ate effectively. Under each of the intermediate discharge rates, the reduced storage requirement allows the Adobe Road and Sears Point reservoirs to be large enough to serve the Project by themselves (rather than combining with Lakeville Hillside reservoir as in -alternatives 2B and 2D). hl addition, the storage require- ment for a 15% discharge rate allows the Lakeville Hillside site to be large enough to serve the Project by itself. Other Project components would not change under any, of the intermediate discharge options. Impacts of Intermediate Discharge Rates The decrease in the size of the reservoirs due to reduced storage requirements would not result,ul a substantial change in impacts. Because the reservoirs are sited in valleys, the reduction in volume does not result in a proportional decrease in either dam height or water elevation. The area under construction 1-61 Volume of Reclaimed Water Discharge Design Discharge Rate Average Volume (as a Proportion of Reclaimed water of Russian River Flow) Discharged to Laguna (October 1—May 14) 1 Percent 685 million gallons 5 Percent 1,825 million gallons 10 Percent 2,740 million gallons 15 Percent 3,490 million gallons No Project 3,245 million gallons Existing Conditions 3,735 million gallons 20 Percent 4,640 million gallons The average volume of the Russian River from October 1 to May 14 341,000 million gallons Table 1-15. for a reservoir, which is the primary determinant for impacts, would not change substantially under any of the discharge options. Similarly, the reduc- tion in size of pipelines or size of pumps in pump stations would not result in a smaller construction zone or level of construction activity. There would be some reduction in the operational noise level at pump stations; but not to a level less than significant. The decrease in agricultural irrigation would result in decreased_ length of pipeline and number of pump stations. It is likely environmental impacts would also be reduced. However, because the actual properties to be irrigated are not known at this time for any of the, discharge options, it is not possible fully to determine the degree of reduced impacts. Thus, even though the reduc- tion in irrigated acreage for Alternative 2, South County, would be approximate- ly 30 .percent under a 5% option and nearly 60 percent under a 10% option, the reductions in some impacts would not necessarily be reduced proportion- ately, and depending on the actual loca- tion and characteristics of the properties to be irrigated, could be substantially more or less than the reduction in the total irrigation acreage. The significant impact of agricultural irrigation with regard to the numerical standard for dissolved copper for Alternative 3 (West County) would be avoided by the 5%, 10%, and 15% options. However, significant impacts on the esteros would not be avoided by any of the reduced irrigation options. . The elimination of a second reservoir for Alternatives 2B and 2D would elimi- nate impacts associated with that site including pipelines leading to the site as well as the pump station at the dam. Impacts for alternatives 2B and 2D, with only one reservoir each, would be reduced but not eliminated. The increased river discharge (relative to a one percent design discharge) would not require a change ii tine size or location of the outfall structure in the Laguna. The increased discharge would increase. impacts on the Laguna and Russian River related to streambank erosion, flooding, and water quality. However, the increases would .not be sufficient to change the level of impacts from less than significant to significant for any of tine Surface Water Hydrology criteria. Mitigation of the 5%, 10%, and 15% discharge options would not avoid signifi- cant adverse water quality impacts, but the cumulative projects scenario (nitrogen load reduction) combined with mitigation would avoid significant impacts'. Study and control of aluminum in Santa Rosa reclaimed water would mitigate the only significant adverse cumulative impact. 1-62 INTRODUCTION AND SUMMARY r INTER -OFFICE MEMORANDUM Copy to ea. ouncilmn TO: Joe Netter, City Manager Copy to FROM: Jim Pekkain, Director of Recre 'o [counci'CorCr-esponde,nce opytoDATE: October 22, 1997 opy to RE: Feasibility Study on Privatizing Recreation Department cc: Pamala, Mary&Guy Per your request I have contacted several consulting firms and requested letters of interest in conducting a feasibility study on privatizing the Recreation Department. In discussing the situation with the various consultants it seems there are two phases to this process. Phase l would be for the city council to request the possibilities of privatizing the department. Phase H would require a more extensive evaluation on how this might be accomplished if privatizing seemed feasible. I stated to the consultants contacted, they were to submit to me.their letters of interest by the end of the week. I have listed those firms interested and when -they can submit their letter of interest. 1. Nichols Conway, Arroyo Association 234 El Molino, Suite 202 Pasadena, CA 91101 818-564-8700, fax 818-564-1116 Extensive experience in privatization. Letter by end of week. 2. Jonn rieis, David M. Griffin & Association 4320 Auburn Blvd., Suite 2000 Sacramento, CA 95841 916-485-8102 Experience in management studies. Letter by end of week. 3. Lon Hayhurst, LB Hayhurt.& Association 1505 Bridgeway, Suite 203 415-332-4166 Does it matter, I forgot they did the salary study? 4. Mike Davis, Shannnon Association. 1601 Response Rd, Suite 390 Sacramento, CA 95815 916-5674280 Experience with privatization studies. Will fax letter by Wednesday and mail hard copy. -5. Jim Harrington Consulting 2125 Baywood Lane Davis, CA 95616 916-756-8.161 Has done several studies. Interested but too busy until January to take on another project. 6. I have also contacted Rick Brown. I will be talking to him at 11 am today. 9 0 1°✓z3 From the desk of: James P. Peuain TO: ✓City Manager Assistant City Manager Public Works Director Public Works Superintendent Recreation Supervisor Coordinator/Prog. Specialist 1601 Response Road, Suite 380 Sacramento, CA 95815 Phone (91.6)567-,9510 Fax (916) 567-9540 11150 Santa Monica Blvd., Suite 200 Los Angeles, CA 90025 Phone (310)473-1457 IM To: ,iim Pekkain City of Rohnert Park Fax: 707/584-4325 Phone: Re: Privatization Assessment Quote r, r, 450 4�;e 4v . Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Counc;.Iman Copy to /O • l S� L Copy to Copy to From: Michael Davis Pages: 3 Date: 10/22/97 Q Urgent 0 For Review ❑ Please Comment ❑ Please Reply ❑ Please Recycle • Comments: As we discussed, enclosed is a quote for a privatization assessment. A hard copy is also being mailed with attachments. I From the desk of: James Po Pekkain TO: V' City Manager Assistant City Manager Public Works Director Public Works Superintendent Recreation Supervisor Coordinator/Prog. Specialist DNI&S The Davis Company a j Norf; 1). ri l(1.(,, u October 22, 1997 Jim Pekk-ain Recreation Director City of Rohnert Park 6750 Commerce Boulevard Rolrnert Park, CA 9492$ Dear Mr. Pekkain: COPY VIA rA.\ Tn response to your telephone call, I have prepared a general scope of work and an estimated price for conducting a privatization assessment of park and recreation services in the City of Rohiiert Park. The suggested approach and price range is very preliminary, and is based on our telephone conversation as well as the firm's experience with similar projects. Assessment Goals It is my understanding that the City desires to undertake an assessment of current parKs and recreation services in order to: • determine if services are presently provided in. an effective and efficient maltner; • determine what opportunities may exist to privatize some or all services; and • detemiine if and how privatization might impact service cost and quality. Approach It is our practice to precisely tailor each rnanagernent assessment to the .client's specific needs. Therefore, we would carefully review the specific goals and questions that are of concern to the City Manager and City Council before proceeding. However, given the size and scope of your existing program (i.e. an approximate. $1.6 million annual operating budget), we reconunend that the City proceed as follows: Please 1- Complete an assessment of opportunities to privatize based on: 1. An operational evaluation of services, staffing, costs, revenues, users, facilities, and current contract providers; City of Rohnert Park Page 2 October 22, 199; 2. Benchmarking the city's service delivery practices, costs and revenue to Live to seven Other cities that provide similar services through private iueans. 3. Examination of user fees and other revenue opportunities to improve the financing of user -oriented services. The effort would include briefings for City Council, and it appropriate, cornmission/comrnittee members, prior to and upon conclusion of this assigiunent. This level of effort would clearly identify any opportunities that might exist to enhance services or reduce costs tluough further privatization.. If such opportunities do exist and the City Council elects to pursue them, then we would be pleased to assist the City take the following steps, if needed: Phase 11- Implementation 1. Preparation of requests for proposals and bidder solicitations; 2. Examination of service proposals; and, 3. Ass.istiag in the selection process. Based On our telephone conversation with you, we recommend that you initially commission a Phase I assessment only. This will help limit the City's cost by undertaking only the work necessary to determine if realistic service delivery alternatives do, in fact exist. Cost & Timing We estimate that Phase I of the assigrunent described above would be completed within eight to ten weeks for a cost in the range $15,000.00 to $18,000.00. This quote assumes that accounting and budget records are in good order sv that program costs can be readily determined. Our quotes are nonhhal.ly conservative. After refining the work plan, the cost could be less. Thank you very much for contacting us. Please let me know if you need any additional information. I have enclosed a description of our firm's qualifications and advisory services for your information. Michael Davis enclosure (included with original only-) TO: The Honorable Mayor and Members of the City Council FROM: Lorraine Roberts, Administrative Secretary DATE: October 22, 1997 It is with regret that we must inform you that one of our long-time Commissioners and Committee Members, Julie Yonemura, has passed away. We were notified this afternoon by the Department of Public Safety. Recently, Julie has also been active helping Hazel Brubaker at the Senior Center by delivering meals. Julie has been a regular visitor to City Hall, and we shall all miss her. Ir rn ` 10/24/1'99' 12:27 7075857322 KITE PAGE 01 Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman Copy to'j Copy to1r+, w Copy to Message from Mifio U. Kite 5716 Dexter Circle, Rohnert Park, CA 94928 USA Tel:707/584-1963 Fax:707/585-7322 Pager. 707/571.9280 Intemet:miho0 mihokite.00m DATE: 10/24/97 Total Page Count: 5 (including this page) TO City of Rohnert Park RE: Condolence Messages for Julia Yonemura VIA: Fax Message: Upon receiving the sad news of Julia Yonemura's sudden death on Wednesday (10/23), from Carol Grubler, another member of the RP Sister Cities Relations Committee, l immediately forwarded the information to Mr. Otani, the honorable President of the Hashimoto International Friendly Association. The following four pages are my translations of the condolence messages received by fax from people in Hashimoto. Please make certain that these messages are forwarded to appropriate people such as her survived family members and the members of the RP Sister Cities Relations Committee. Thank you. Miho Kite 10/24/1997 12:27 -7075857322 KITE PAGE 02 Message of Condolence 1. heard last night from Mrs. Kite that Ms. Julia Yonemura had suddenly passed away. It was so sudden that we are stunned and still cannot fully accept hor passing. Ms. Yonemura- rendered remarkable contributions in promoting friendship between Hashimoto-shi and the City of ' Rohnert Park as an enthusiastic member of the Rohnort Park Sistcr Cities Relations Committee and as its Chairperson in recent years. Ms. Yonemura ' visited Hashimoto twice, once in 1992 and again in 1994, and showed a heart -felt welcome to the Hashimoto citizens in 1995 when they visited Rohnert Park. She made a great contribution in broadening .the international awareness among the Hashimoto youth by cooperating with Homestay America Exchange in helping to implement the three homestay programa for the Hashimoto junior high and high school students. Through Lliese exchanges covering a tspand of almost 15 yearn rsince Lim formation of the Hashimoto - Rohnert Park sister cities relationship, we have come to regard the citizens of Rohnert Park as our close friends from our hearts and to respect the City of Rohnert Park as our second home -town. While we cherish memories of the late Ms. Julia Yonemura, once again we appreciate her contributions toward the international friendship among the citizens of Hashimoto and Rohnert Park. We would like to offer our sincere condolence and wish that your spirit is resting in peace. Hideharu Otani Advisor Hashimoto International Friendly Association October 24th, 1997 -1'/024/1997 12:27 7075857322 KITE PAGE 03 Upon receiving the sad news about the death of Ms. Yonemura, we are simply stunned. We cherish memories of her and pray for her repose. Yoko Kitamura Mayor of Hashimoto City We would like to express our heart -felt condolence and sincere appreciation fur the late Ms. Yonemura's friendt5 iip. We cherish her great contributions. Kazuuchi Matsutani President Hashimoto International Friendly Association 10/24/1997 1.2.17_ 7075857322 KITE PAGE 04 Condolence Message I found out about the sad news from Mr. Otani and Mrs. Milio Kite. I really cannot believe it since she looked so healthy when we visited Rohnert Park, and I really feel sad. She welcomed us warmly and gave us many memories, and it _is still impossible for me to think that. she is gone. I wanted to see her again.. Please rest in peace. T am praying fo.r. her. Ikuyo Jouchi 135-18 No, Hashimoto-shi, Wakayama 648 0736-34-2189 10/24/1997 12:27 7075857322. KITE PAGE 05 I just received a telephone call from Mr. Otani (Honorary President, Hashimoto International Friendly Association) and found out that Mrs. Julia Yoneniura has passed away. She has been so kind to me all this time ever since I first met her. I am feeling such a great shock since I just started to think what to write on this year's Christmas card to her. "I want to meet TERUKO-san in Hashimoto again" she had said..... "Cake and coffee I had at TERUKO-san's house were delicious, -I look forward to the next time" she had -said..... 1 just feel so sad. I sincerely pray that she is resting in peace. Teruko dada I)irecLur Hashimoto International Friendly Assorietion ia� za��97 MINUTES TO FOLLOW t Rohnert Park City Council Minutes October 14, 1997 The Council of the Citv of -Rohnert Park met this date in regular session commencing at 6:00 p.m. in the City Offices, 6750 Commerce Boulevard, Rohnert Park, with Mayor Linda Spiro presiding. CALL TO ORDER: Mayor Linda Spiro called the regular session to order at approximately 7:20 p.m. and led the pledge of allegiance. ROLL CALL: Present: (5) Councilmembers Flores, Mackenzie, Reilly, Vidak-Martinez & Mayor Spiro Absent: (0) None Staff present for all or part of the meeting: City Manager Netter, City Attorney Flitner, Assistant City Manager Leivo, City Engineer Gaffney, and Planning and Community Development Director Schulenburg. 1. CLOSED SESSION. • Mayor Linda Spiro reported on the closed session which commenced this evening at 6.00 to discuss matters listed on the agenda attachment, representing an update, with no action taken at this time. 2. APPROVAL OF MINUTES. Upon motion by Councilmember Mackenzie, seconded by Council - member Flores, with abstention by Councilmember Reilly due to absence from the meeting, the minutes of September 23, 1997 were otherwise unanimously approved as submitted. 3. APPROVAL OF BILLS: Upon motion by Councilmember Mackenzie, seconded by Council - member Reilly, City bills presented per the attached list in the amount of $1,874,382.57 were unanimously approved. 4 ADDING INFORMATIONAL NON-AGENDAED MATTERS. Mayor Linda Spiro asked Councilmembers or staff if there were any non-agendaed informational items to add to the agenda. Councilmembers signified several miscellaneous items to add to the agenda under Council Reports or Matters from Council as follows: two items from Councilmember Reilly; one item from Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez; three items from Councilmember Flores; one item from Councilmember Mackenzie; and possibly one or two items from Mayor Spiro. S. YOUTH CITY COUNCIL REPRESENTATIVES from 1997-98 Youth of the Year Program Maybr Linda Spiro introduced Youth Representatives Senior Elizabeth Leonhardt and Junior Vivian Snyder, who provided the youth report, advising . that Council had been provided with the list of newly selected. Juniors for the Youths of the Year Program as follows: Jessica Batacao, Marisa Eggering, Cynthia Rail, Eric Rico, An -ie Schmale, Vivian Snyder and Jennifer Weaver. They also advised that they were unable to provide a report on the recent Youth meeting regarding the teen center, as neither of the Youth Reps attending this Council meeting were present at that meeting. -- Council welcomed the newly selected Junior, Vivian Snyder. Councilmember Flores referred to a report on an interesting concept for a Youth Panel, which he obtained at the recent League of California Cities meeting he attended, and requested it be distributed to the Youth Representatives. 6. MAYOR'S PRESENTATION OFAPPRECIATION: On behalf of the full Council, Mayor Linda Spiro shared contents of Resolution No. 97-175, and presented two of the same resolution prepared for Dale and Gary Tatman, acknowledging and honoring both for their contribution to the Roberts Lake Brick Memorial. -- Council commended the Tatmans for their efforts, as father and son, working together on this worthy project. -- Mayor Spiro announced that interested citizens could contact the Parks & Recreation Department to purchase memorial bricks. As signified later on this Council meeting agenda, City Manager Netter confirmed a Ceremonial Event for the Roberts Lake Memorial Brick Project has been scheduled, Saturday, November 1, .1997, and that appropriate flyers will be made for the occasion. 7. SCHEDULED PUBLIC APPEARANCES: 1) Rev. Sam Tharpe re. Annual Thanksgiving Dinner -- Reverand Sam Tharpe of Shiloh Fellowship, 4070 Snyder Lane, Santa Rosa, requested use of the building space for the Annual Thanksgiving Dinner, as the City has provided for the past six or seven years, and also the usual donation toward this event. -- Upon motion by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Mayor Linda Spiro, to continue the tradition of a contribution in the amount of $500 and to waive fees for use of the building space at the Burbank Recreation Center for this Annual Thanksgiving Dinner, was unanimously approved. -- Council expressed appreciation for all the efforts involved for this beneficial annual event. 2) Dave Eck re. wastewater options and land use -- Dave Eck, 1311 Rosie Court, distributed to Council his memo dated. October 14, 1997 regarding Wastewater Options (copy attached to original set of these minutes). He reviewed contents therein expressing concerns of water reuse regarding the Geysers Option, Geysers Subsidies, Reuse within Rohnert Park Planning Area, and Future Value of the Water. Dave Eck's concluding comments signified that as the County develops and as agricultural interest struggle to find water, the value of the reclaimed water will grow. He thinks the Gallo project is an example of what the future prospects will be for water as a commodity. His overall problem with the Geysers project is that, it is considered a disposal project: He thinks that saving at least half the water for reuse in the immediate urban area, would be a prudent move. The value of the water on down the road is going to be high. -- Discussion included Councilmember Flores commenting that Former Councilmember Dave Eck has held a consistent philosophy for over twenty years pertaining to the desire to see commodities well used and reservoirs used very effectively. Mr. Flores reviewed additional aspects of these valuable resources and the importance of looking at the different alternatives being considered and a reduced burden on rate payers. 8. UNSCHEDULED PUBLIC APPEARANCES: Mayor Linda Spiro stated that in compliance with State Law (The Brown Act), citizens wishing to make a comment may do so at this time (limited to 3-5 minutes per appearance with a 30 minute total time limit). John Hudson, 399 Bonnie Avenue, referred to information provided for the upcoming Community Summit and expressed concerns about the support of pro -development and no environmental organization sponsors. He shared his views pertaining to compromise with developers being a delusion and reasons for supporting greenbelt retention. He also referred to the recently approved 1997-98 City budget and reviewed signified amounts on pages 36 and 33 to express his concerns related to subsidizing building development and It, Rflh i'i Park �Y� C(iY1�iCa Minutes » (3)> OCtob' 1 7: 4, 199 anticipated sewer revenues, penalties, and footnotes regarding breakdowns for the extension of the sewer plan and other purposes. Mr. Hudson explained efforts in process to begin drafting a ballot measure to address this situation to communicate to anybody interested in aspects of Proposition 218 to reduce taxes and prevent cities from using the proceeds of those taxes for development fees, except for development fees or assessments. ********************************************************************************** 9. CONSENT CALENDAR Mayor Linda Spiro asked if there were any questions regarding the matters on the Consent Calendar, which were explained in the City Manager's Council Meeting Memo. Council agreed to remove items from the Consent Calendar for discussion as follows: Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez requested removal of Resolution No. 97-185; Councilmember Flores requested removal of Resolution No. 97-182; Councilmember Mackenzie requested removal of Resolution No. 97-178; and Councilmember Reilly requested removal of Resolution No. 97-177. Acknowledging the City Manager/Clerk's report on the posting of the meeting's agenda ACCEPTANCE of CASH/INVESTMENTS REPORTS: Year End, June 30, 1997 and Month End, July 31, 1997 Resolution Nos: 97-179 PROCLAIMING "WORLD POPULATION AWARENESS WEEK", OCTOBER 26 THROUGH NOVEMBER 1, 1997 97-180 CALLING FOR SEALED PROPOSALS FOR A NEW FIRE ENGINE FOR THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY 97-181 AWARD OF CONTRACT FOR TRAILER MOUNTED JET VACUUM FOR THE PUBLIC WORKS WATER DIVISION 97-183 APPROVING FUNDING AGREEMENT WITH CALIFORNIA ENERGY COMMISSION FOR PURCHASE OF LED TRAFFIC SIGNALS 97-184 ACCEPTING SUBDIVISION IMPROVEMENTS AND AUTHORIZING RELEASE OF SECURITIES, HONEYBROOK SUBDIVISION 97-186 AUTHORIZING CLASSIFICATION AND SALARY FOR NEW AND RECLASS- IFIED ROHNERT PARK POSITIONS 97-187 REJECTING THE CLAIM OF MARY JANE GUERRA (re. alleged injury to pet) Upon motion by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Councilmember Mackenzie, with the exception of Resolution Nos. 97-177, 97-178, 97-182 and 97-185, the Consent Calendar as otherwise outlined on the meeting's agenda, was unanimously approved. ********************************************************************************** Ra�hi�ertParlc Cfty ned hliot�Ees (tj OCtob+er` i4, 1:947 Resolution Nos: 97-177 PROCLAIMING OCTOBER 23-31,1997 AS "NATIONAL RED RIBBON WEEK" Mayor Linda Spiro shared the title of this resolution, to which Councilmember Reilly signified was the purpose for requesting removal of the item from the Consent Calendar. Upon motion by Councilmember Reilly, seconded by Councilmember Flores, and unanimously approved, Resolution No. 97-177 was adopted. 97-178 PROCLAIMING FRIDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1997 AS "UNITED NATIONS DAY" Mayor Spiro shared the title of this resolution. Councilmember Mackenzie referred to the letter provided for this item from Robert and Barbara Abramson, Members of the Board of Directors, Sonoma County Chapter, United Nations Association, and signified they were also personally known to Mr. Mackenzie as members of the Rohnert Park Tennis Club. The Abramsons' called him requesting Council's support of this item and, also provided a United Nations flag to fly on the designated day, if that is the desire of the City Council. --Mayor Spiro responded the resolution is scheduled for consideration at this time, and the request to fly the flag could be considered later on the agenda under Matters from Council. Upon motion by Councilmember Mackenzie, seconded by Vice Mayor Vidak-Martinez, and unanimously approved, Resolution No. 97-178 was adopted. 97-182 APPROVING LEASE/RENTAL AGREEMENT WITH THE SENIORS' CRAFT SHOPPE FOR ROOM SPACE AT 6800 HUNTER DR., SUITE A (to Dec. 31, 2000) Councilmember Flores pointed out that this lease agreement the City has with the Seniors' Craft Shoppe is to the end of the year 2000. He specifically noted that this is an excellent program with efforts providing 10% of their sales to the City. On behalf of the full Council, Councilmember Flores commended these efforts of the seniors and expressed special appreciation to Manager Evelyn Kim. -- Mayor Spiro added that if citizens haven't bought any hand -knitted items lately, the Seniors' Craft Shoppe is the place to do so and is probably the best kept secret in Rohnert Park. Upon motion by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Councilmember Reilly, and unanimously approved, Resolution No. 97-182 was adopted. 97-185 RATIFYING THE MEMORANDUM OF AGREEMENT WITH THE ROHNERT PARK PUBLIC SAFETY DISPATCHERS (RPPSD) Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez called to the attention of the City Council that this is the second time this item has been brought to the Council, which the Council already approved. Now it is being brought back to the Council again because of some clean up items which identified the Rohnert Park Peace Officers Association as the Public Safety Dispatchers' representatives on meet and confer issues. She thought this was an oversight and is the second time it has happened, considering the Chamber of Commerce agreement after Council had approved it. She expressed that she just hoped this would not happen again and just hoped the City Manager will take better care of staff reviews. -- Mayor Linda Spiro requested Council's direction regarding this resolution. Upon motion by Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez, seconded by Councilmember Flores, and unanimously approved, Resolution No. 97-185 was adopted. 0. 1 1_ Park City Coar�efl NL�ntttes (5); Octobet� 1 10. ROHNERT PARK WELLNESS CENTER letter request for extension of time on hospital site project development -- City Manager Netter referred to the letter request dated September 16, 1997 previously provided to Council for this item and additional information dated October 14, 1997 distributed at this Council meeting, including copies of the Wellness Center's bylaws. Mr. Netter advised one item is still outstanding regarding clearance of the property use from Martin Stone who is currently out of state. Mr. Netter has contacted Mr. Stone's local broker who has not had any success in contacting Mr. Stone directly because of his travels. He hoped to have more information on this by the next Council meeting. -- Mayor Linda Spiro shared she also had communications with the broker pertaining to assurance of renting the property for $1 and he indicated there would be no problem with Mr. Stone's agreement. Representatives of the Rohnert Park Wellness Center, Bob Niklewicz and Christina Bell, reviewed aspects of the request for the extension of time related to the involvement of extensive paper°work, and responded to Council questions, including confirmation of continued enthusiasm for this effort. Upon motion by Councilmember Reilly, seconded by Councilmember Flores, to grant the six (6) month extension of time to the Rohnert Park Wellness Center on the hospital site project development, was unanimously approved, 11. BOND ISSUE FOR CITYHALL/LIBRARY -- City Manager Netter referred to the staff report of October 10, 1997 from Finance Director Harrow, provided to Council for this item. He shared contents therein, as reviewed in the Council Meeting Memo, and responded to Council questions, including confirmation responding to Vice Mayor Vidak-Martinez inquiry regarding why staff time was being spent on this project without Council authorization, that this was discussed in the recent budget work sessions during which staff was given direction by Council to proceed with preparation of the report for Council consideration. -- Discussion included Council comments on beneficial aspects related to the possibilities of this trial balloon and concluded in Council concurrence to defer further discussion of this item until after the Community Summit, scheduled October 16-18, 1997. 12. COMMUNITY SUMMIT 1) Update -- City Manager Netter referred to the complete packets provided to Council for the Community Summit scheduled this week, October 16-18, 1997; 'which includes an agenda format and detailed questions.and direction to be taken during this two half day and one full day visioning process. Mayor Linda Spiro encouraged everyone to get involved in the efforts of this Summit. She understood sign-ups to date indicate. there will be great attendance, but some space is still available. Referring to preceding concerns expressed this evening during unscheduled public appearances, the Mayor noted for the record, that the environmental community is represented well in this effort, including representation seated on this Council. -- Councilmember Mackenzie reviewed his efforts, as requested by staff, to talk to people he knows in the environmental community of Rohnert Park and surrounding community, to make 'sure they are well aware of these proceedings. --City Manager Netter explained additional items distributed to Council including updated sign-up list totaling a little over 100 individuals; Community Summit Roles listing the various individuals, groups, and titles of facilitators, resources and participants; and an outline regarding Guidelines for Brainstorming and Communication. 2) Budget -- City Manager Netter referred to details of the Community Summit Budget to date which was provided to Council, as reviewed in the Council Meeting Memo, and responded to Council questions. -- Discussion included Council comments regarding the importance of this event to the community over the next 15 to 20 years and encouraged the public to attend, if at all possible. Upon motion by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Councilmember Mackenzie, the Community Summit Budget as presented by staff in the amount of $18,618.50 (copy attached to original set of these minutes), was unanimously approved. 13. BOARD OF PERMIT APPEALS -- City Manager Netter reviewed the staff report for this item dated October 2, 1997 from Building Official Lee Braun, regarding City Attorney Flitner's draft ordinance previously prepared for instituting a Permit Appeals Board. Mr. Braun is recommending the City consider combining the Building Code Appeals Board with a Board of Appeals for disabled access issues. Also, Fire Department decisions regarding Uniform. Fire Codes and City fire sprinkler ordinances could be heard by this Board. This combined Board could then serve in these three major functions. If the Council concurs with the recommendation, the Building Code Appeals Board of five (5) members could be expanded to seven (7) members to include two additional representatives of the disabled community. If Council so directs to proceed with this recommendation, the City Attorney would be requested to prepare the revised ordinance, which would enable staff to solicit interested citizens who meet certain criteria, as outlined in the memorandum for the Board of Appeals membership. City Manager Netter and City Attorney Flitner responded to Council questions related to this item. Discussion included Council comments commending various beneficial aspects of this idea; expressing varied concerns pertaining to the appointment process for ensuring the qualifications and intents of Permit Appeals Board Members; and questioning the appeal process from the decisions of this Board, which included pros and cons of no longer involving the Council, i.e. advantage of taking these matters out of the political arena, but possible disadvantage related to no longer being able to grant variances or waivers. Council concurred to proceed with efforts toward the Board of Permit Appeals, as recommended by staff, and with suggestion to contact other cities that have similar boards for expertise they might be able to provide. Council signified agreement with Mayor Spiro that the concept sounds good, but it needs further review. Councilmember Mackenzie commented further that the City's new Building Official could consult with some of the other member agencies and advise Council on his findings. 14. WILFREDIDOWDELL SPECIFIC PLAN - REVIEW OF POTENTIAL PROCESS OPTIONS City Manager Netter introduced the Planning and Community Development Director, Wendy Schulenburg, who was available to review this item. Mr. Netter reviewed the background related to this item advising that about 6 to 8 months ago, Council directed him to have staff research this area to find the most expeditious way to proceed. This item was also discussed during the last General Plan process. Former Planning Director Paul Skanchy was the one identified to bring all the property owners of this area together. . f7} €ictibe' 1,:17 Efforts included hiring an architect and engineer. Unfortunately, the property owners did not come to consensus, basically, in the area of cost to the property owners to proceed with a specific plan. The suggestion then surfaced that possibly the City could take the lead and proceed with this Specific Plan area so it could influence the City's economic development lands. This was brought to the City Manager with cooperative support of the idea mentioned to be with the caveat of some kind of reimbursement agreement to the City to make sure there would be no loss of funds. Planning Director Wendy Schulenburg has been assigned to research possible process options for this project, with results to date as signified in the staff report provided to Council. Planning Director Wendy Schulenburg, via overhead projections, reviewed the staff report of October 8, 1997 from Assistant City Manager Leivo and Planning Director Schulenburg, regarding Process Options and Projected Preparation Costs for the Wilfred/Dowdell Specific Plan. She responded to Council questions during review of the four alternatives outlined in the staff report, concluding with staff recommendation of preferred process alternative, as follows: *Option A -- Secure informal feedback from LAFCO Staff/Board Members regarding Community Separator Issue *Option B — Submit Application for County General Plan Amendment *Option C -- Proceed with the Specific Plan Preparation (including the Development Agreement, EIR and LAFCO Annexation Application eOption D -- Applicant's prepare Specific Plan/City serve in a technical support/ advisory role Staff Preferred Option: Considering the inherent risks in financing a plan that possibly may never come to fruition due to lack of support from the County and LAFCO, staff believes that the most cost effective and efficient alternative would be to meet with LAFCO informally (not in a regularly scheduled meeting) with the intent of obtaining feedback regarding the feasibility of securing an exception to the LAFCO Community Separator Annexation Policy. Should the City Council support this alternative and direct staff to proceed, meeting with LAFCO would be scheduled in late October or early November. Pending a positive response from LAFCO, staff would return to the City Council with a resolution directing the preparation of the specific plan and establishing a development agreement with the involved property owners. Discussion proceeded as follows: Councilmember Reilly asked if the property owners were not interested in coming in before, are they going to be interested in any of these options? -- Planning Director Schulenburg responded that about 75% of the land owners have signified being interested in this, and thinks it is more of a financial issue rather than lack of interest, with comment that it seems they are just not up to speed, as compared to not in agreement. -- Councilmember Reilly asked if staff would recommend meeting with the property owners, as the signified costs would eventually become theirs. So, if the interest is close to 50%, that would be important for Council to know. -- Ms. Schulenburg responded that they are aware of the costs. -- Councilmember Reilly signified he liked staff's first suggestion, as reviewed in Option A. Councilmember Flores expressed appreciation for the efforts of staff for providing Council with the alternatives to review. Mr. Flores signified that the option he favored would be Option C, with comments on the importance of working with the County Board of Supervisors, which would be appropriate, as LAFCO's approval would not do any good, if the Board of Supervisors does not approve. He suggested Council consider this carefully. Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez commented she was perplexed to have an item from the last City Council agenda of September 23rd, when she believed Council instructed staff to prepare certain documents for Council consideration on a future agenda. She asked if that had been dropped and the above report put in its place, as she was just a little surprised, because she thought the intent of the Council at that time was to go forward. -- Planning Director Wendy Schulenburg responded that staff had previously considered presenting a resolution to the Council on this item, however, with further review of all the factors to consider, felt the preparation costs estimated for this Specific Plan were a substantial amount, as listed on the attachment to the staff report provided to Council, which the City may not be able to recover, so needed further Council consideration of alternatives. Councilmember Mackenzie referred to his recommendation about eight months ago of meeting with LAFCO on this item. He agreed with the Staff Preferred Option and with the preceding suggestion by Councilmember Reilly that there be a meeting with the land owners. Councilmember Mackenzie stated it was clear to him then, as it is now, that there is no sense in going ahead with Option C until this is done. Councilmember Flores signified that he shared a concern Mayor Spiro had expressed, during the preceding review of this item, regarding the proposed preparation costs for the Wilfred/Dowdell Specific Plan estimated at $63,580. A Motion was made by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez, for the City Council to direct staff to proceed with Option C with the condition that there be a meeting with the property owners and City staff, following verification by the City Attorney, of perhaps instituting a lien process to make sure costs advanced by the City could be recouped. Discussion of the motion proceeded as follows: Mayor Linda Spiro signified she did not have a problem with Option C, as this may be a way to incorporate all the efforts. She requested a friendly amendment to the motion to combine doing both .Option A & C at the same time. Mayor Spiro further signified that, if there is to be consideration of putting liens on property, the land owners would need to be aware of that, too, and asked if perhaps all of this could be graciously combined in the motion. -- Councilmember Flores accepted this friendly amendment to his motion. Councilmember Reilly commented he was not sure of the reasons for jumping that far ahead, because Option A seems to represent the concept of staff's recommendation. He expressed disagreement in proceeding with Option C along with Option A, due to the possibility of LAFCO not approving, which would result in an unnecessary expenditure to the City. But if the City proceeds with Option A, and if LAFCO approves, and the land owners agree, then the City could proceed with consideration of the additional costs. Mayor Linda Spiro asked if there is any way to proceed with Options A & B. and if a "no" is received on either one of the first two options, then proceed with Option C. Councilmember Reilly signified that he was not sure that if everything were positive on Options B, C & D, would Option C be the best of the three options. Councilmember Flores commented that he thought Planning Director Schulenburg indicated that the City Council needs to determine how to proceed, if the property owners are not agreeable toward working things out, to ensure that the financial interests of the City are protected. If the property owners are agreeable to the financial aspects, and if LAFCO approves, it could stop there, but whether or not these are agreeable, it would be beneficial to go to the County's Board of Directors, due to the likelihood that they could work with the City on possibilities. Councilmember Flores clarified, therefore, that he did not think it was advisable to proceed only with Option.A. Councilmember Mackenzie signified that he believed the City Council should adopt the Staff Preferred Option, and would not vote in favor of the motion, as stated. Mayor Linda Spiro advised there is a motion and a second on the floor, and requested Councilmember Flores to restate his motion. The motion was restated by Councilmember Flores, as seconded by Vice Mayor Vidak-Martinez, to proceed with Option C and to work with the property owners to be sure they are in agreement of the financial interests of the City and, at the same time, include the above friendly amendment by Mayor Linda Spiro to combine doing both Option A & C at the same time, and notify the land owners regarding consideration of putting liens on property. Councilmember Flores responded to further Council inquiry for clarification, that the motion is to proceed with Option C regardless of discussions the City has with LAFCO, due to the beneficial aspects of working with Members of the County Board of Supervisors. The motion was approved, 3-2 with Councilmember Mackenzie and Councilmember Reilly dissenting. Councilmember Reilly signified his disapproval of the direction to proceed with this item regardless of what LAFCO says. Councilmember Mackenzie commented that the motion was voted on and carried, so they can live with that. Councilmember Reilly added that if a "no" is received from the land owners, and if LAFCO says "no", then there is no way to go. City Manager Netter responded that any major ideas that surface, can be discussed, and LAFCO is. not going to say "no", but may request addition acreage to offset reduction of Community Separator area. The costing involves a whole number of options that will need to be considered. -- Mayor Linda Spiro added that probably all the Councilmembers have called on the Board of Supervisors and asked that question. RECESS Mayor Linda Spiro declared a recess at approximately 8:55 p.m. RECONVENE Mayor Spiro reconvened the Council meeting at approximately 9:05 p.m. with all Councilmembers present. 1 S. GENERAL PLAN MATTERS: 1) Current Status Report -- City Manager Netter referred to the staff report provided to Council for this item, dated September 30, 1997 from Assistant City Manager Leivo regarding the General Plan and Community Summit Progress Report, and advised this report relates to the visioning process in which the City is currently involved. Mr. Netter shared that he recently talked with Cotati's City Manager Paul Marangella and Planning Director Dennis Dorsch, who signified expecting the land use information, referred to in tonight's staff report, from the specialists within a couple of weeks. Committee meetings have been held on a couple of the elements, which are close to being done, i.e. Economic, Land Use and Open Space Elements; and Housing, Conservation and Safety Elements. The process is moving along. The pivot point is the Community Summit City Manager Netter shared that he has requested an estimated timeline from Assistant City Manager Leivo, which could be available for review at the next Council meeting. City Manager Netter and Assistant City Manager Leivo responded to Council questions related to this status report, including confirmation that the above -reference to elements which are close to being done, refers to drafts, not finals, prepared by Hudson & Associates to help identify community planning issues. The final reports will not be prepared until after the summit, pending input from the summit. Assistant City Manager Leivo explained the continual culmination of efforts for the General Plan process which has most recently involved input from the 1995-96 General Plan Citizens Committee, the Planning Commission, workshops and interviews held by Hudson & Associates, and anticipated from the Community Summit to be held later this week. 2) Budget -- City Manager Netter referred to the budget provided to Council regarding Consultant Fees for 1997 General Plan (copy attached to original set of these minutes). All have been previously approved by Council with the exception of the two sub -contracts to be explained in item #3 listed next on this agenda. The total cost to date for consultants is approximately $209,350. This includes Dyett & Bhatia, Crane Transportation Group, Freilick/Kaufinan/Fox & Sohagi, Hudson & Associates, and Illingworth & Rodkin, Inc. Originally, the budget was estimated to be about $100,000, therefore, the City Manager has requested Finance Director Harrow to amend the amount in the 1997-98 budget to approximately $250,000. This should cover all consultants, as well as miscellaneous printing and other costs. Council concurred. 3) Consultant Contracts: a) Crane Transportation --City Manager Netter referred to information provided to Council on this item, as reviewed in the Council Meeting Memo. In working with the Environmental Consultants, Dyett & Bhatia, along with Crane Transportation Group, it was discovered that Dyett & Bhatia needed additional details that were not part of the original scope of work for Crane Transportation Group. Mr. Dyett indicated some of the services are generally part of a normal scope of work. The City Manager requested Assistant City Manager Leivo to work this out between the two consultants. Mr. Leivo came back indicating that the items were not part of the original scope of work, but in Er Rah::iicuri�ne.1;; order to save approximately the same amount ($4,200), the City could reduce the total option of transportation runs from 10 to 9, which would offset that approximate amount. This recommendation has been approved by the City Manager and submitted to the City Council for its information. In addition, the City Council has been provided with the September 29, 1997 letter signed -by the City Manager, outlining additional scope of work for Crane Transportation Group required by Dyett & Bhatia. Council concurred. b) Dvett & Bhatia/Subcontractor's approval --City Manager Netter explained the contract with Dyett & Bhatia, approved by the City Council at its meeting of August 12, 1997, included a total compensation; of $80,230. This information was provided to the City Council at the Council meeting, identified in the staff report as "Exhibit A". Subsequent to that approval, Dyett & Bhatia approached the Assistant City Manager with a revised compensation section, identified as "Exhibit B", which included two (2) subcontractors, i.e. Wetlands Research Associates for $4,340 and MOC Physics Applied for $1,350. City Manager Netter signified that he signed the contract with the inclusion of these two additional amounts, which were not previously approved by the City Council, or listed in Mr. Dyett's original proposal, therefore requested Council to authorize the ratification of these amounts. -- City Attorney Flitner responded to Council question that the, Council can authorize certain funding approvals for business items such as this which are listed on the meeting's agenda. Discussion continued during which Assistant City Manager Leivo responded to Council questions, including confirmation that the insurance certificates received for this item were approved by REMIF and have been filed. A motion was made by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Vice Mayor Vidak-Martinez, and approved 4-1, to authorize ratification of the additional above -reviewed expenditure of $4,340 for Wetlands Research_ Associates and $1,350 to MOC Physics Applied, with Councilmember Reilly dissenting due to the consultant not including these subcontractors in the original contract submitted, after responding to the City's request in good faith and, therefore, should be held responsible. Mayor Spiro suggested staff share the -concerns expressed herein with the consultant. 4) Joint Meetings - City Council/Planning Commission re. Proiect Alternatives City Manager Netter explained this item, as reviewed in the Council Meeting Memo, regarding staff recommendation for Council consideration of meeting on alternate Tuesdays from City Council meetings to review results and action upon recommendations from the Community Summit. -- Council concurred to schedule this joint meeting on Tuesday, November 4, 1997 at the Senior Center, if available, and signified it would not be necessary to provide a meal for this meeting. ADDITIONAL UNSCHEDULED ITEM -- Mayor Linda Spiro announced there was a special person in the audience of this Council meeting. She recognized the City's newest Press Democrat reporter, Jim Sweeney, and extended congratulations to Jim and his wife, on the recent occasion of their wedding. Rahirtark (yctdber 1,19'# 16. COUNTY OF SONOMA PERMIT AND RESOURCE MANAGEMENT DEPARTMENT re. Application. for Swine Operation/Letter of Approval with conditions City Manager Netter explained this item, as reviewed in the Council Meeting Memo, indicating approval of Robert and Carol Sissa's application for a swine operation on agriculturally zoned land off Snyder Lane, with seven (7) Planning Department conditions, and three (3) Health Department conditions. Supervisor Tim Smith has indicated, if the Council is interested, that he would recommend that the City Council consider appealing this decision, from the nature of a policy issue, to the County Permit and Resource Management Department and/or the County Board of Supervisors. The City Manager requested Council's direction regarding this matter. Councilmember Flores signified the issue is extremely difficult from an aesthetic view and it would be desirable not to have the enterprise adjacent to the City. However, it is a lawful and legal use of the land and the City Council needs to treat the situation carefully. So it is clearly appropriate and yet may have possible negative influences on the community. Councilmember Mackenzie commented that he would not vote to appeal the operation as proposed and believed the Council can rely on the County to make sure these conditions are met. He wished the Sissa's good luck on their hog farm operation and mentioned that it was his understanding that the location is zoned for agricultural use. Councilmember Reilly signified having two concerns. One concern is the 500' separator was measured from the south as well as the west, so it is clear the school and the east side apartments are in close proximity. The other concern was regarding previous statements made by Mr. Sissa related to noise levels, odors and flies, which was the cause of Councilmember Reilly being inclined to appeal. Mayor Spiro commented that she did not think Mr. Sissa's previous comments were an indication that he was intending to violate any regulations and thought he was just trying to paint as bleak a picture as he could in order to try to get into the City. She, personally, was not about to say a person cannot do something like this in an agricultural area that is zoned for it, whether or not she doesn't like the noise, smell, etc. She's never noticed odor from a similar place farther down the road. Councilmember Mackenzie signified he smells the odor every time he bicycles past the other confined pig operation. A motion was made by Councilmember Mackenzie, seconded by Mayor Linda Spiro, for the City Manager to write to the appropriate organizations in the County of Sonoma, to signify that the Council, on behalf of the City of Rohnert Park, expect them to strictly monitor the conditions, as outlined in the County's letter of approval. Under discussion of the motion, Councilmember Flores requested that the letter also incorporate some of the earlier sentiments in terms of being appropriate agricultural use and enterprise. -- Mayor Spiro signified a friendly amendment to copy the letter to the Sissa's. -- Councilmember Reilly signified his intent to support the motion, though it does not go quite as far as he thought it should, but he would like Council to direct staff to inquire about the permit process to find out how long the Council has to request an appeal, r t?'artc Cf tte ilYintttcs` (i3): 00ob r 1d, 2997> since the noise does come into the city limits. -- Mayor Spiro commented that the City does not oversee that area and made comparisons with the Council's previous allowance for the dog place in Rohnert Park, with the provision of waiting to see if it presented any problems. -- Councilmember Reilly clarified that he was asking staff to report back to Council on what the appeal process is. -- Mayor Spiro asked if the reason is to appeal or wait until after the fact, to which Councilmember Reilly responded, that was his question. --City Attorney Flitner explained that an appeal time is normally 10 working days and can state the grounds for an appeal, or the appeal can be general. He thought the time had run out to appeal this item, but he could check and find out. -- Councilmember Reilly requested the City Attorney to check and make sure it is 10 days, but if it is 30 days or more, there may be time to consider this matter further. The preceding motion, with inclusion of above comments, was unanimously approved. 17. TRANSPORTATION MATTERS: 1) Neighborhood Traffic Control (undulations) - update City Engineer Gaffney reviewed his staff report provided for this item, via overhead projections, regarding results of further research on the speed undulations previously presented to Council. Installation of the speed humps on Jasmine Circle on the north side from Snyder Lane to the Expressway would cost approximately $7,000. Mr. Gaffney responded to additional Council questions related to this item. -- Councilmember Flores commended this effort and gave a manual to the City Engineer that Mr. Flores received recently from a League of California workshop he attended, which focused on transportation issues of other cities in the state. A motion was made by Councilmember Reilly, seconded by Councilmember Flores, and unanimously approved, to proceed with the bid package for the above -reviewed item. Edward Bielecki, 957 Eleanor Avenue, referred to comment he made on these speed humps and the September 23rd Council meeting, and encouraged Council to consider the installation of speed humps on Eleanor Avenue, as well as other streets in the City. 2) Sonoma County Transportation Authority (SCTA) - Calthorpe Study City Manager Netter advised the Final Report/Executive Summary of the Calthorpe Study was provided to Council regarding transportation issues, which includes funding needs, in the North Bay from Tiburon to the south, and up to Healdsburg to the north. Since the Sonoma. County Transportation Authority (SCTA) is specifically requesting Council's input regarding this Sonoma/Marin Multi -Modal Transportation & Land Use Study by Monday, October 20, 1997, the workshop Council previously suggested should be set as soon as possible to identify issues and concerns related to this study so it can be forwarded to SCTA. Discussion included Council signifying agreement that it was too late to schedule a separate workshop for this item and proceeded at this time with the following comments: Rely, t l ag MUCH:' t {14 Uctot>azr 14, 1W rkz *Mayor Linda Spiro commented she would like to receive some input from the Council on this item as the Governor has recently indicated the possibility of raising the gas tax. If the 10% gas tax can be done, coupled with this freeway measure, she would certainly like to. include widening all the way; as it was her understanding that money was the biggest obstacle. •Councilmember Flores, in reference to preceding comments by the Mayor, signified that to enable up to 10 cents on the gallon, is what he thought was indicated. He referred to the importance of retaining viable factors, one of which is to have the financial resources. He would consider recommending the various costs signified for the funding to take care of traffic problems from Petaluma to Marin County, which would be an important consideration, but questioned viability for the other situation, unless there are some additional revenues. •Councilmember Reilly mentioned, just as wishful thinking on his part, that compared to other areas across the country with less than 40 cents per gallon on gas, questioned why there seems to be no way possible to get these transportation improvements rolling, and presumed the hefty jump in gas prices out here is that people are willing to payout here. He referred to differing opinions on the U. S. 101 widening with comparisons depending on the time of day and cost factors, and commented on the philosophy he has involving the potential of regional sharing. Mr. Reilly commented further on aspects of promoting the high occupancy vehicles and potential of rails, and the need of efforts toward attempts of having workable accesses for rail corridors. If additional lanes have to be constructed, funds should be used for access lanes, because there are enough passenger lanes. •Mayor Linda Spiro responded that it is not part of this plan, according to her previous review of the Study, which is going to be on the SCTA agenda next Monday. She shared concerns related to knowing graphics of the area and having a lot of construction industry in this county, giving the example of her son in telecommunications, who cannot take a passenger, and thought it is incumbent to look at this. Provisions for trains and bikes need to be made, but there is the need to consider others who cannot use these modes of transportation. *Mayor Spiro shared a portion of the above -referenced report provided to Council for this item pertaining to the cost estimates for the different scenarios which were prepared at a planning level of detail, and have been subject to refinement throughout the preparation of the Study, which included indicating "that Scenario `B' is the most costly, about $1.1 billion, with a net unfunded cost of about $800 million. Scenario `D' would have a lower total cost of about $550 million and a net unfunded cost of about $300 million. Scenarios `A' and `C' have the same transportation improvements and would be about $100 million less expensive than Scenario `D'. Of the various transportation improvements analyzed, those to Highway 101 would be the most costly. - -Scenario `D' would have the highest net unfunded annual operating cost of $20 million, while Scenario `B' would have the lowest, at $13 million. Scenarios `A' and `C', which each have the base rail system, would have a net unfunded annual operation cost of approximately $13.5 million." 'ark;ig Ciuet �3�nutes f13 Octtbrer i4, •Councilmember Mackenzie signified that the question before the Council is whether it accepts, tonight, the Multi -Modal Study, as presented. He commented that the Calthorpe Study deliberately excluded any widening north of Novato, which was argued for by Members of this City Council at the last SCTA meeting. He asked if this City Council now desires to move to accept the signified widening and rail within Sonoma County, which specifically states that any future widening would be through other funding measures, i.e., maybe it would be through above -referenced gas tax. A motion was made by Councilmember Mackenzie, seconded by Councilmember Reilly, to signify the City Council accepts this Multi-'Modal/Transportation and Land Use Study, as presented at this time, and request Mayor Linda Spiro, as representative of the City Council, to convey that acceptance. Under discussion of the motion, Council comments proceeded as follows: *Mayor Linda Spiro responded that she was not aware that the Council has previously directed its representatives in this manner. If so, it would be a policy change, if the Council says it wants to approve this Study and nothing more. Mayor Spiro pointed out that, at the same time, she has already indicated her position, and is the reason the item is on this agenda, because of considering the southern link as a partial solution, but she does ,not believe it is the entire solution. Now that attention has been brought to the additional piece of information regarding the 10% gas tax possibility, to signify the Council's support of only the Study as presented, is very short sighted and very inappropriate. Mayor Spiro signified that, if the motion proceeds as stated, she was going to disapprove. •Councilmember Reilly commented that SCTA has asked if Council accepts or denies the Sonoma County part of this Study, and is asking if Council wants to widen U. S. 101 down to the Marin County line. °Mayor Spiro encouraged the Council to give her direction to signify support of this Study but encourage them to look beyond and go beyond this Study, acknowledging that there will be a lot more discussion on this item. •Councilmember Flores expressed agreement with Mayor Spiro's comments that the Study represents only partial solutions, and signified permission to support the Sonoma County part of the Study and, later, if resources become available, pursue expanded options. •Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez signified she concurred with above comments by Councilmember Flores. THE ORIGINAL MOTION - Councilmember Mackenzie commented that after his experience at the last Council meeting when he mistakenly thought he was voting one way and ended up being another, and signified the preference to retain the language of his original motion, seconded by Councilmember Reilly, being that the City Council accepts the above Sonoma/Marin Multi -Modal Transportation and Land Use Study, as presented, as a plan for transportation improvements for Sonoma County, and that Mayor Spiro, as the City Council representative to SCTA, so notify this acceptance at the SCTA meeting next Monday. The motion, as stated, was approved 3-2, with Vice Mayor Vidak-Martinez and Mayor Spiro dissenting. A MOTION was made by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Mayor Linda Spiro, to give the Mayor flexibility to voice concerns (at the next SCTA meeting) on the area south of Petaluma and encourage possible funding that might be necessary to improve traffic flow/conditions. Comments for clarity of the motion proceeded as follows: •Councilmember Reilly clarified that the motion preceding this one passed signifying support of the Study, and now the Council is expressing consensus that it is concerned about measures of improvement needed from Novato toward the north, which he signified that he and Councilmember Mackenzie could support, as long as it is clear that this does not include widening U. S. 101 for the referenced area. *Mayor Spiro responded that to support the Calthorpe Study signifies agreement with the necessity of widening all the way to Novato, but then, having nothing to do with the Calthorpe Study, have us look into additional transportation issues. •Councilmember Reilly signified that the additional comments would be for the purpose of asking what are we going to do about it now, and not going in there specifically to make recommendations, but let's find out what the plans are. *Mayor Spiro responded further that she would be glad to do that, but if she inadvertently says she would be happy if consideration is given to adding some lanes, she would not be able to help it. *Councilmember Mackenzie responded that if the Mayor, as an individual, expressed such an opinion, he thought that would be appropriate. -- Councilmember Reilly agreed. THE ABOVE MOTION by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Mayor Linda Spiro, was unanimously approved, with inclusion of additional comments signified herein for clarity. EXTEND COUNCIL MEETING — Upon motion by Councilmember Mackenzie, seconded by Councilmember Reilly, and unanimously approved, to extend the Council meeting past 10:00 p.m. to finish necessary agenda items. 18. COUNCIL COMMITTEE AND/OR OTHER REPORTS: 1) Joint Meeting w/Parks & Recreation Commission - 9/25/97 meeting results Councilmember Reilly reported this was a good meeting. City staff present included City Manager Netter and Public Works Manager Bill Stephens, also present at this Council meeting. -- Councilmember Flores commented on the importance of following up on those areas to be considered. 2) Joint Meeting.w/Cotati-Rohnert Park School District Board - 9/30/97 meeting results Council expressed concerns regarding the incompatibility signified at this meeting and agreed with the need to make special efforts toward promoting congenial dialogue in order to work together effectively. -- Mayor Linda Spiro referred to the letter to the School District, which she requested the City Manager to prepare, in lieu of formal minutes, for the purpose of having a future reference regarding items discussed at the joint meeting. Mayor Spiro advised that she asked the City Manager to include in the letter the concerns she had Ra6gert Far& pity �ounc� Mi�eutes (I7} ()ctubetsl�, I99'f regarding the Public Safety issue and the concept of uniforms. -- Discussion included Council commending the working relationships between the City and School staffs, and encouraged representatives of these staffs to continue working together effectively, as in the past. Council concurred with suggestion by Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez for Council Committee Members Flores and Vidak-Martinez to rekindle the 2x2x2 Committee, and to schedule a meeting as soon as possible to jointly consider items of concern for Committee recommendations to the signified bodies. 3) Mayors' & Councilmembers' Assn. Exec. Session. 10/9/97 mtg. results (Spiro) ®Working Group - Final Draft of Revenue Sharing/Fiscalization of Land Use Mayor Linda Spiro reported on the meeting and advised plans to go through this draft one more time at the General Meeting. Cotati Mayor Sandra Elles said they were backing off revenue sharing for now, but will try again in the future. Supervisor Tim Smith gave a very enlightened presentation on water issues in the County over the years. 4) League of California Cities - North Bay Division -- Mayor Linda Spiro advised she was installed as President at the recent North Bay Division meeting, and would chair her first meeting to be held in Napa on December 4th. She express appreciation for the support of the Councilmembers who came to her installation meeting. 5) Ad Hoc Committee for Employment Evaluation Procedures Councilmember Mackenzie reported that this Ad Hoc Committee, comprised of Council - member Flores and himself, had a meeting dealing with the terms of employment of the City Manager and evaluation procedures. Councilmember Flores provided a very brief report on this item at the previous Council meeting. Councilmember Mackenzie advised that the Ad Hoc Committee met this afternoon to discuss this and they will be working further on it. --Councilmember Flores commented on the draft agreement of employees, that they expected to be hearing back from the City Attorney on this, and will meet again. It was his understanding that the suggested time to share the decision in open forum, has happened, and he looked forward to reporting back to the City Council as a whole regarding this matter. 6) Mayors' & Councilmembers' City Select Committee -- Mayor Linda Spiro advised that this Committee, which she also chairs this year, will be considering appointments to openings on Hazardous Waste, Airport Land Use, and Environmental Allocation. -- Councilmember Reilly commented that this Hazardous Waste opening was a different one than the one he has been on, and he did not want to commit to another until he finds out if he would be able to attend the meetings. 19. COMMUNICATIONS: Communications per the attached outline were brought to the attention of the City Council. No action was taken unless specifically noted in these minutes. 1) Professional Engineers in Calif. Government Initiative -- City Manager Netter referred to item #30 on Communications from Cotati Mayor Elles and advised some cities have been writing letters in support of this item. He inquired if Council wanted to signify support of this initiative. 2) Internet Tax Bill -- City Manager Netter referred to item #32 on Communication from the U. S. Conference of Mayors expressing opposition to the Internet Tax Bill and asked if Council wanted to also support this opposition. Upon motion by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez, and unanimously approved, to write the above -signified letters expressing Council support on both issues. 3) October/Breast Cancer Awareness Month -- Mayor Linda Spiro referred to item #35 on Communications from U. S. Conference of Mayors and requested a proclamation be prepared over her signature for this item. 20. MATTERS FROM/FOR COUNCIL: 1) Women's Call to Action/Governor's Conference in October 1997 (Spiro) •Mayor Spiro & Vice Mayor Vidak-Martinez attendance approval Mayor Linda Spiro referred to the preliminary authorization signified at the previous Council meeting to enable attendance at this conference, and confirmed her interest to attend. -- Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez advised she would be unable to attend. Upon motion by Councilmember Mackenzie, seconded by Vice Mayor Vidak-Martinez, and approved 4-1, to authorize the expenditure for the Mayor to attend this conference, with Councilmember Reilly dissenting with comment that self-improvement is a great idea but did not think citizens of Rohnert Park should pay this cost. 2) Santa Rosa Subregional Wastewater Options •Set date for Workshop/Public Hearing City Manager Netter advised the Council had previously signified interest to schedule a workshop and public hearing for this item.-- Discussion concluded in Council concurrence to schedule a combination workshop/public hearing for this item immediately preceding the next City Council meeting from 5:00 - 6:00 p.m., Tuesday, October 28, 1997. Council requested an invitation be extended to Ed Braunner, Assistant City Manager, Santa Rosa to provide an update during this workshop/public hearing. Council also signified the intent to be prepared to take action at the close of this meeting, if the City of Santa Rosa has taken action on this item by then. 3) Initial Environmental Study re. Proposed Housing Project on Snyder Lane Mitigated Negative Declaration (Reilly) Councilmember Reilly signified deferral of this item. He requested that the Planning Commission information, regarding this study, be provided to the City Council for review. 4) Summit related article in Sept. 1997 American City & County (Mackenzie) re. "SPRAWL things considered: Controlling Growth" by M. Dobbins & P. Dobbins Councilmember Mackenzie commended this article about visioning exercising and thought it would be a point of view for the Council to read prior to the Community Summit to be . held in Rohnert Park later this week. . Rolni�Cf £jQ+eutes :t '..>..: ..Cb` 14} "7> 5) California Task Force for Employment of Older Workers (Spiro) *Nomination of Award/Hazel Brubaker Mayor Linda Spiro referred to information provided to Council regarding this item and recommended nominating Hazel Brubaker for this Governor's 1998 Recognition Award. Council concurred. 6) Certified Child Care information from League of California Cities' Conference Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez shared informational material with Council on this item which she obtained from one of the workshops during -the recent League of California Cities' Conference. She thought it was important information because of Welfare Reform and would allow parents to be assured that those who watch their children were not felons. This would be for people doing exempt child care and parents would know they would at least be certified for criminal clearance. 7) Reimbursement of Tax Revenues to Cities - efforts by League of California Cities Councilmember Flores referred to one of the workshops he attended during the recent League of California Cities' Conference regarding this matter and signified the importance of supporting the League's efforts for reimbursement of tax revenues that appropriately belong to cities. Council agreed. 8) Employment letter -- Councilmember Reilly deferred his comments. on this item noting that it was scheduled for review later on the agenda under item #2, City Attorney's report. 9) Non -Profit Funding requests/response letters -- Councilmember Reilly asked if staff has sent the letter to the non-profit organizations which were declined funding requests during the City's recent budget efforts. City Manager Netter responded he would. check with the Finance Department. 10) United Nations Flag -- Councilmember Mackenzie referred to the resolution adopted by the Council earlier this evening proclaiming Friday, Oct. 24, 1997 as "United Nations Day" and reviewed the letter request from Robert and Barbara Abramson regarding same, including request for Council approval to fly the United Nations Day Flag on this date at an appropriate location in the City. Council concurred. 11) Fiscal Activities/Planning Division, League of California Cities' Conference Councilmember Mackenzie signified the importance of preceding comments regarding fiscal activities, and reported on Community Planning sessions he attended regarding growth in the state. Bill Fulton, the keynote speaker, encouraged working together with our fellow organizations, such as School Boards, and representatives of cities and county government. Let legislators in Sacramento know ideas and concerns to resolve on local fiscal problems. 12) "Making Cities Livable" book -- Mayor Linda Spiro presented this excellent book which. compared cities around the world, and has been published in both English and German languages. She recommended starting a City Hall Library of city books very specific to certain types of issues. Council agreed. Rpt: Park Gstg �aune�l Mmutes (2(i) t)ctvbex I4,1�9? 13) Railroad Crossings -- Mayor Spiro commented on the deteriorating condition of the asphalt at the railroad crossing on Southwest Boulevard. -- City Manager Netter responded that Council previously authorized the expenditure for the repair of the railroad crossing asphalt, and City Engineer Gaffney would provide a progress report later. 14) Park flooding -- In response to question from Mayor Spiro, City Manager Netter confirmed staff has handled the previous concerns expressed about a park flooding. 15) Recreation Department Management Position -- Mayor Linda Spiro advised that Council briefly discussed possibilities :.regarding options for the Management Position in the Recreation Department. -- Councilmember Reilly commented, so there would be no misunderstanding regarding this matter, that staff was directed see what information might be available regarding privatization possibilities, whether or not there are any actual areas to consider for the City, but to have the information to review. There is no effort on Council's part at this time to do privatization, but does want to review the information. 16) Sonoma State University -- Mayor Spiro shared that a citizen called her recently and wanted to know why the City is not more concerned with SSU students. The caller thought it would be nice for the City to give more attention to students when they return to school, like the example noticed in other areas of merchants putting up flags to welcome back students. The Mayor suggested the possibility of having some kind of student recognition with the holiday tree lighting event, or flags, etc. -- Councilmember Reilly suggesting have a meeting with the Associated Student Body to ask them for ideas and to let the students know the Council is interested in the students and wants to be involved. Council concurred. 17) Visioning Efforts -- Mayor Linda Spiro referred to recent comments by Key -Note-Speaker Bill Bradley, participating in the current visioning efforts for the community. The Mayor encouraged everyone who planned to attend the Community Summit later this week, to consider an applicable quote Mr. Bradley shared regarding "what is the greater good for all in our community". 21. CITY MANAGER W REPORT: 1) Traffic/Stop Signs - Raley's & M Park - Status report City Engineer Gaffney reviewed his staff reports provided to Council for both of these items, and responded to Council questions. -- Council encouraged the City Engineer to communicate .with Raley's management regarding possibilities for traffic improvements at the shopping center. Council also encourage the use of speed trailers, where deemed appropriate, in other areas of the community. 2) Trustee Sale of 5'x 70' parcel at rear of 4429 Fairway Dr. - Status report City Manager Netter reviewed this staff report dated October 1, 1997, from Planning Director Skanchy, which was provided for Council's information. 3) Teen Center - progress report - update -- City Manager Netter advised this progress report dated October 2, 1997, from Housing Services Specialist Diane Tomkins, was provided for Council's information. -- Councilmember Flores referred to letter recently received from Sonoma County Associates for Youth Development (SCAYD) signifying interest to be involved in this effort, and encouraged staff to be sure SCAYD is included. 4) Structure Changes at Department of Public Works -- City Manager Netter referred to this staff report of October 6, 1997 from Public Works Manager Bill Stephens, which was provided for Council's information. 5)')Fall Clean -Up, Rohnert Park Stadium Parking Lot, October 17-26,1997 City Manager Netter advised the staff report and flyer for this annual event were provided to Council for its information. 6) Holiday Tree Lights update -- City Manager Netter reviewed the staff :report dated October 8, 1997 from Public Works Manager Bill Stephens, regarding status of Holiday Tree Lighting project and options to consider due to underestimated expenditures. City Manager Netter recommended the expenditure of $35,000 for the initial -cost for electrical lighting upgrades, noting that there would be only the additional costs annually for;lifts and rental of equipment to put up the lights. The City Manager responded to Council questions. A motion was made by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Councilmember Mackenzie, and unanimously approved, to authorize the above -reviewed expenditure. Councilmember Mackenzie recommended consideration of other options to consider in future years, once the improvements are completed for the Holiday Lighting on Expressway, giving the example signified in the staff report from Mr. Stephens that electrical outlets are already installed at a location on Golf Course Drive. 7) El Nino Committee - update -- City Manager Netter advised the staff report for this update was provided for Council's information. 8) Roberts Lake Memorial Brick Proiect/update - Ceremonial Event, Sat., Nov. 1, 1997 City Manager Netter referred to the staff report -provided to Council for this update, "and confirmed the Ceremonial Event would be held on Saturday, November 1, 1997. --Mayor Linda Spiro advised she would be returning from Long Beach in the morning of November 1 st, and requested the event start no earlier than 12:00 noon, so she would be able to attend. 9) City Projects Priority List - Status Report -- City Manager Netter advised this status report was provided for Council's information. 10) Memorial Plaque for Georgia Moses - 1997 -- City Manager Netter described this memorial plaque prepared in memory of Georgia Moses, as previously requested by a group of citizens. Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez clarified the request was from the School Attendance Review Board (SARB). 11) Price Club update -- City Manager Netter shared the good news that the permits have been issued for the Price Club location and signs have been put up for the contractors. It appears that the proposed IMAX plans have been consummated. R[�trlr City Counei! Ngs�tes 12) School District meeting -- City Manager Netter advised that the City Manager and Planning Director Wendy Schulenburg did meet recently with School District Representa- tives, Superintendent Jan Hefron and Engineer Carlson, regarding annexation possibilities of the Creekside Middle School location. Ms. Hefron was encouraged to communicate with Supervisor Tim Smith, who commented on the need to get a real sphere of influence, and indicated that Measure N was included in that area because it does exempt the School District. 13) City Hall Newsletter -- City Manager Netter shared the example prepared, for Council's information, for the proposed monthly, or bi-monthly newsletter from City Hall. 22. CITY ATTORNEY'S REPORT.• 1) Any items from closed session City of Rohnert Park vs. Golis -- City Attorney Flitner advised the Golis case opinion was received, and it seemed to be resolved in the City's favor. A more complete update will be reported at the next Council meeting. 2) Closed session vote procedures (Mackenzie) City Attorney Flitner referred to personnel matters which involve discipline alterations with the City Council's jurisdiction of an employee. When the matter is completely over and resolved so there is no further consideration by the Council, which he did not think had been reached yet in the particular current situation, the statute stipulates that the vote of the Council should be reported, according to the subsection of the Records Reporting Act, known as the Brown Act. As far as any other voting procedure, he is aware of none. Discussions can be kept in closed sessions, but citizens are entitled to know what happened, which has been done. In light of that, the employee is entitled to confidentiality. Councilmember Reilly commented that his question was regarding the letter that was dated September 23rd to the City Manager signed by the Mayor with signature lines placed at the bottom of the letter and signed by the other Councilmembers as if they voted. He did not see anything on that letter that said confidential which was provided by the City Council to the City Manager. His concern was that to offer, or not to offer, to discuss the matter can take place, but not the vote. Mayor Linda Spiro confirmed this question was referred to the City Attorney at the previous Council meeting, for his response at this meeting, to be sure the Mayor handled it right. Councilmember Reilly expressed his concern that it seemed to him there was one step taken beyond what should have been. Councilmember Mackenzie signified that was the question he raised at the last Council meeting because he believed a vote had been taken in closed session, and he asked at that time if it should be something that should be announced in open session. This was very specifically in reference to the form taken in the above -referenced letter where it says voting in favor of and voting in opposition to the motion, which is the question to the City Attorney. City Attorney Flitner responded that when this matter was discussed with him prior to the last Council meeting, the Mayor asked for options to be delivered to the City Manager in closed session. One of the options was not to do that, among other options to consider. ............ . t... .:...:..::.:.: City Attorney Flitner advised he was not there at the previous closed session, but the memo signified as the contemplated tool delivered to the City Manager in the closed session is a personnel matter and the City employee is entitled to confidentiality, to which he or she has the option to make it unconfidential. Once that process is completely over and/or an appeal process is completed, once that action is completely over, then the memo can be announced. Since the item was not completely over, the City Attorney felt it should be confidential. When completely over, the vote should be announced, but the City Attorney signified it was his understanding the matter is still under consideration. Councilmember Mackenzie signified it has been discussed by members of the City Council in the press. Councilmember Reilly commented that six months from now, if there is still no closure to this, asked when would it be reported in an open session. City Attorney Flitner responded that sooner or later, the City Council will reach a final decision to be accepted by the parties, or not. As a matter of normal routine, an employee has the right to appeal a direct supervisor's determination by taking it to another authority over that supervisor. In the situation where the City Council has the right to determine to hire or fire an employee, that employee would have to review concerns with the Council, so it would seem appropriate that he or she has the right to request taking another look at it. Then, when a decision is reached, if the employee does not like it, another recourse would be to appeal to courts, but once a decision is reached, a public announcement is appropriate, otherwise, the right to privacy would be invaded. Councilmember Reilly commented that from the City Attorney's explanation, they should not have been able to read about this item in the paper. City Attorney Flitner responded those are confidential matters and that letter was not to be released to the public. Mayor Spiro stated what was said in public was related to not renewing the existing contract and what was read in the paper were Council opinions, and not what happened. Councilmember Flores advised that the Ad Hoc Committee comprised of himself and Councilmember Mackenzie are working on the present contract and the City Manager continues until July 1, 1998. The Committee plans to meet and complete its review of the present contract. Councilmember Reilly asked about the confidential nature of this matter if it can be announced in public that the contract is not renewed, to which Mayor Spiro responded an announcement had to be made by a required date for the contract. Councilmember Reilly commented for further clarification, then the only thing that could not be announced was the vote, but not to renew the contract could be announced, and what the Council could not say was what the vote was at the time. City Attorney Flitner confirmed the votes could not be announced until the process is completed: -- Mayor Spiro responded she announced the decision, not the vote. Councilmember Mackenzie stated he read the votes in an article in the Press Democrat, so this matter obviously needs clarification, that it is inappropriate for the Council to be discussing this with anyone in a public manner or in the press. City Attorney Flitner advised that his opinion is that Council can announce the decision and it can be reported to the public. Beyond that, he did not think the law requires disclosure unless the City Manager wants it to be disclosed. Beyond that, the Council is resolved to the matter which can be relayed to the public. That was the reason for his previous advice to the Mayor regarding that part which can be divulged. Mayor Linda Spiro confirmed the decision was disclosed, not the vote. 3) Political Activities of Non -Profit Recipients of Public Funds (Reilly) . City Attorney Flitner referred to previous inquiry on this item from Councilmember Reilly. Mr. Flitner acknowledged that, due to returning from his vacation today, he had not had an opportunity to review the response letter dated September 30, 1997 from the Attorney General's Office, provided to Council for this meeting. -- In response to the City Attorney's previous inquiry asking whether the Rohnert Park Chamber of Commerce could retain its non-profit status if they take political positions regarding candidates and/or issues, the letter from the General Attorney's Office signified that this question should be directed to the Internal Revenue Service. The Deputy Attorney General signified, informally, that whether a non-profit organization would jeopardize its tax-exempt status for such activity, depends on the particular section of the Internal Revenue Code under which it is tax-exempt. For example, charities (exempt under section 501c3) are mostly restricted: no activity for or against a candidate and insubstantial amounts for lobbying. Other types of tax exempt organizations, such as business leagues (exempt under section 501 c6) are much less restricted. The particular section of the Internal Revenue Code that applies to the Chamber could be obtained from the legal counsel for the Chamber of Commerce. City Attorney Flitner signified he will research and discuss the matter further with the Chamber legal counsel and report back to the City Council. 23. UNSCHEDULED PUBLIC A PPEABANCES. Mayor Linda Spiro .asked if there were any additional unscheduled public appearances at this time. No one responded. 24. ADJOURNMENT. Mayor Linda Spiro adjourned the meeting at approximately 11:27 p.m. Deputy City Clerk Mayor jh/mi.:101497mn 4j ,17 5) California Task Force for Employment of Older Workers (Spiro) *Nomination of Award/Hazel Brubaker Mayor Linda Spiro referred to information provided to Council regarding this item and recommended nominating Hazel Brubaker for this Governor's 1998 Recognition Award. Council concurred. 6) Certified Child Care information from League of California Cities' Conference Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez shared informational material with Council on this item which she obtained from one of the workshops during the recent League of California Cities' Conference. She thought it was important information because of Welfare Reform and would allow parents to be assured that those who watch their children were not felons. This would be for people doing exempt child care and parents would know they would at least be certified for criminal clearance. 7) Reimbursement of Tax Revenues to Cities - efforts by League of California Cities Councilmember Flores referred to one of the workshops he attended during the recent League of California Cities' Conference regarding this matter and signified the importance of supporting the League's efforts for reimbursement of tax revenues that appropriately belong to cities. Council agreed. 8) Employment letter -- Councilmember Reilly deferred his comments on this item noting that it was scheduled for review later on the agenda under item #2, City Attorney's report. 9) Non -Profit Funding requests/response letters -- Councilmember Reilly asked if staff has sent the letter to the non-profit organizations which were declined funding requests during the City's recent budget efforts. City Manager Netter responded he would check with the Finance Department. 10) United Nations Flag -- Councilmember Mackenzie referred to the resolution adopted by the Council earlier this -evening proclaiming Friday, Oct. 24, 1997 as "United Nations Day" and reviewed the letter request from Robert and Barbara Abramson regarding same, including request for Council approval to fly the United Nations Day Flag on this date at an appropriate location in the City. Council concurred. 11) Fiscal Activities/Planning Division, League of California Cities' Conference Councilmember Mackenzie signified the importance of preceding comments regarding fiscal activities, and reported on Community Planning sessions he attended regarding growth in the r state. Bill Fulton, the keynote speaker, encouraged working together with our fellow organizations, such as School Boards, and representatives of cities and county government. Let legislators in Sacramento know ideas and concerns to resolve on local fiscal problems. 12) `Making Cities Livable" book -- Mayor Linda Spiro presented this excellent book which compared cities around the world, and has been published in both English and German languages. She recommended starting a City Hall Library of city books very specific to certain types of issues. Council agreed. Partcf* Coune€11Ii�nots . (2{1ta 14,17 13) Railroad Crossings -- Mayor Spiro commented on the deteriorating condition of the asphalt at the railroad crossing on Southwest Boulevard. -- City Manager Netter responded that Council previously authorized the expenditure for the repair of the railroad crossing asphalt, and City Engineer Gaffney would provide a progress report later. 14) Park flooding -- In response to question from Mayor Spiro, City Manager Netter confirmed staff has handled the previous concerns expressed about a park flooding. 15) Recreation Department Management Position -- Mayor Linda Spiro advised that Council briefly discussed possibilities regarding options for the Management Position in the Recreation Department. -- Councilmember Reilly commented, so there would be no misunderstanding regarding this matter, that staff was directed see what information might be available regarding privatization possibilities, whether or not there are any actual areas to consider for the City, but to have the information to review. There is no effort on Council's part at this time to do privatization, but does want to review the information. 16) Sonoma State University -- Mayor Spiro shared that a citizen called her recently and wanted to know why the City is not more concerned with SSU students. The caller thought it would be nice for the City to give more attention to students when they return to school, like the example noticed in other areas of merchants putting up flags to welcome back students. The Mayor suggested the possibility of having some kind of student recognition with the holiday tree lighting event, or flags, etc. -- Councilmember Reilly suggesting have a meeting with the Associated Student Body to ask them for ideas and to let the students know the Council is interested in the students and wants to be involved. Council concurred. 17) Visioning Efforts -- Mayor Linda Spiro referred to recent comments by Key Note Speaker Bill Bradley, participating in the current visioning efforts for the community. The Mayor encouraged everyone who planned to attend the Community Summit later this week, to consider an applicable quote Mr. Bradley shared regarding "what is the greater good for all in our community". 21. CITY MANAGER'S REPORT: 1) Traffic/Stop Signs - Raley's & M Park - Status report City Engineer Gaffney reviewed his staff reports provided to Council for both of these items, and responded to Council questions. -- Council encouraged the City Engineer to communicate with Raley's management regarding possibilities for traffic improvements at the shopping center. Council also encouraged the use of speed trailers, where deemed appropriate, in other areas of the community. I . . 2) Trustee Sale of 5'g 70' parcel at rear of 4429 Fairway Dr. - Status report City Manager Netter reviewed this staff report dated October 1, 1997, from Planning Director Skanchy, which was provided for Council's information. 3) Teen Center - progress report - update -- City Manager Netter advised this progress report dated October 2, 1997, from Housing Services Specialist Diane Tomkins, was provided for Council's information. -- Councilmember Flores referred to letter recently received from Sonoma County Associates for Youth Development (SCAYD) signifying interest to be involved in this effort, and encouraged staff to be sure SCAYD is included. 4) Structure Changes at Department of Public Works -- City Manager Netter referred to this staff report of October 6, 1997 from Public Works Manager Bill Stephens, which was provided for Council's information. 5) Fall Clean -Up, Rohnert Park Stadium Parking Lot, October 17-26, 1997 City Manager Netter advised the staff report and flyer for this annual event were provided to Council for its information. 6) Holiday Tree Lights update -- City Manager Netter reviewed the staff report dated October 8, 1997 from Public Works Manager Bill Stephens, regarding status. of Holiday Tree Lighting project and options to consider due to underestimated expenditures. City Manager Netter recommended the expenditure of $35,000 for the initial cost for electrical lighting upgrades, .noting that there would be only the additional costs annually for lifts and rental of equipment to put up the lights. The City Manager responded to Council questions. A motion was made by Councilmember Flores, seconded by Councilmember Mackenzie, and, unanimously approved, to authorize the above -reviewed expenditure. Councilmember Mackenzie recommended consideration of other options to consider in future years, once the improvements are completed for the Holiday Lighting on Expressway, giving the example signified in the staff report from Mr. Stephens that electrical outlets are already installed at a location on Golf Course Drive. 7) El Nino Committee - update -- City Manager Netter advised the staff report for this update was provided for Council's information. 8) Roberts Lake Memorial Brick Project/update - Ceremonial Event, Sat., Nov. 1, 1997 City Manager Netter referred to the staff report provided to Council for this update, and confirmed the Ceremonial Event would be held on Saturday, November 1, 1997. --Mayor Linda Spiro advised she would be returning from Long Beach in the morning of November 1st, and requested the event start no earlier than 12:00 noon, so she would be able to attend. 9) City Projects Priority List - Status Report -- City Manager Netter advised this status report was provided for Council's information. 10) Memorial Plaque for Georgia Moses - 1997 -- City Manager Netter described this memorial plaque prepared in memory of Georgia Moses, as previously requested by a group of citizens. Vice Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez clarified the request was from the School Attendance Review Board (SARB). 11) Price Club update -- City Manager Netter shared the good news that the permits have been issued for the Price Club location and signs have been put up for the contractors. It appears that the proposed IMAX plans have been consummated. 12) School District meeting -- City Manager Netter advised that the City Manager and Planning Director Wendy Schulenburg did meet recently with School District Representatives, Superintendent Jan Hefron and Engineer Carlson, regarding annexation possibilities of the Creekside Middle School location. Ms. Hefron was encouraged to communicate with Super- visor Tim Smith, who commented on the need to get a real sphere of influence, and indicated that Measure N was included in that area because it does exempt the School District. 13) City Hall Newsletter -- City Manager Netter shared the example prepared, for Council's information, for the proposed monthly, or bi-monthly newsletter from City Hall. 22. CITYATTORNEY'S REPORT. 1) Any items from closed session City of Rohnert Park vs. Golis -- City Attorney Flitner advised the Golis case opinion was received, and it seemed to be resolved in the City's favor. A more complete update will be reported at the next Council meeting. 2) Closed session vote procedures (Mackenzie) City Attorney Flitner referred to personnel matters which involve discipline alterations with the City Council's jurisdiction of an employee. When the matter is completely over and resolved so there is no further consideration by the Council, which he did not think had been reached yet in the particular current situation, the statute stipulates that the vote of the Council should be reported, according to the subsection of the Records Reporting Act, known as the Brown Act. As far as any other voting procedure, he is aware of none. Discussions can be kept in closed sessions, but citizens are entitled to know what happened, which has been done. In light of that, the employee is entitled to confidentiality. Councilmember Reilly commented that his question was regarding the letter that was dated September 23rd to the City Manager signed by the Mayor with signature lines placed at the bottom of the letter and signed by the other Councilmembers as if they voted. He did not see anything on that letter that said confidential which was provided by the City Council to the City Manager. His concern was that to offer, or not to offer, to discuss the matter can take place, but not the vote. Mayor Linda Spiro confirmed this question was referred to the City Attorney at the previous Council meeting, for his response at this meeting, to be sure the Mayor handled it right. Councilmember Reilly expressed his concern that it seemed to him there was one step taken beyond what should have been. Councilmember Mackenzie signified that was the question he raised at the last Council meeting because he believed a vote had been taken in closed session, and he asked at that time if it should be something that should be announced in open session. This was very specifically in reference to the form taken in the above -referenced letter where it says voting in favor of and voting in opposition to the motion, which is the question to the City Attorney. City Attorney Flitner responded that when this matter was discussed with him prior to the last Council meeting, the Mayor asked for options to be delivered to the City Manager in closed session. One of the options was not to do that, among other options to consider. RCrk.fr�e#1 Vis.:: €I .... €lrctlier 14, City Attorney Flitner advised he was not there at the previous closed session, but the memo signified as the contemplated tool delivered to the City Manager in the closed session is a personnel matter and the City employee is entitled to confidentiality, to which he or she has the option to make it unconfidential. Once that process is completely over and/or an appeal process is completed, once that action is completely over, then the memo can be announced. Since the item was not completely over, .the City Attorney felt it should be confidential. When completely over, the vote should be announced, but the City Attorney signified it was his understanding the matter is still under consideration. Councilmember Mackenzie signified it has been discussed by membersof the City Council in the press. Councilmember Reilly commented that six months from now, if there is still no closure to this, asked when would it be reported in an, open session. City Attorney Flitner responded that sooner or later, the City Council will reach a final decision to be accepted by the parties, or not. As a matter of normal routine, an employee has the right to appeal a direct supervisor's determination by taking it to another authority over that supervisor. In the situation where the City Council has the right to determine to hire or fire an employee, that employee would have to review concerns with the Council, so it would seem appropriate that he or she has the right to request taking another look at it. Then, when a decision is reached, if the employee does not like it, another recourse would be to appeal to the courts, but once a decision is reached, a public announcement is appropriate, otherwise, the right to privacy would be invaded. Councilmember Reilly commented that from the City Attorney's explanation, they should not have been able to read about this item in the paper. City Attorney Flitner responded those are confidential matters and that letter was not to be released to the public. Mayor Spiro stated what was said in public was related to not renewing the existing contract and what was read in the paper were Council opinions, and not what happened. Councilmember Flores advised that the Ad Hoc Committee comprised of himself and Councilmember Mackenzie are working on the present contract and the City Manager continues until July 1, 1998. The Committee plans to meet and complete its review of the present contract. Councilmember Reilly asked about the confidential nature of this matter if it can be announced in public that the contract is not renewed, to which Mayor Spiro responded an announcement had to be made by a required date for the contract. Councilmember Reilly commented for further clarification, then the only thing that could not be announced was the vote, but not to renew the contract could be announced, and what the Council could not say was what the vote was at the time. City Attorney Flitner confirmed the votes could not be announced until the process is completed. -- Mayor Spiro responded she announced the decision, not the vote. Councilmember Mackenzie stated he read -the votes in an article in the Press Democrat, so this matter obviously needs clarification, that it is inappropriate for the Council to be discussing this with anyone in a public manner or in the press. City Attorney Flitner advised that his opinion is that Council can announce the decision and it can be reported to the public. Beyond that, he did not think the law requires disclosure unless the City Manager wants it to be disclosed. Beyond that, the Council is resolved to the matter which can be relayed to the public. That was the reason for his previous advice to the Mayor regarding that part which can be divulged. Mayor Linda Spiro confirmed the decision was disclosed, not the vote. 3) Political Activities of Non -Profit Reciuients of Public Funds (Reilly) City Attorney Flitner referred to previous inquiry on this item from Councilmember Reilly. Mr. Flitner acknowledged that, due to returning from his vacation today, he had not had an opportunity to review the response letter dated September 30, 1997 from the Attorney General's Office, provided to Council for this meeting. -- In response to the City Attorney's previous inquiry asking whether the Rohnert Park Chamber of Commerce could retain its non-profit status if they take political positions regarding candidates and/or issues, the letter from the General Attorney's Office signified that this question should be directed to the Internal Revenue Service. The Deputy Attorney General signified, informally, that whether a non-profit organization would jeopardize its tax-exempt status for such activity depends on the particular section , of the Internal Revenue Code under which it is tax-exempt. For example, charities (exempt under section 5016) are mostly restricted: no activity for or against a candidate and insubstantial amounts for lobbying. Other types of tax exempt organizations, such as business leagues (exempt under section 501 c6) are much less restricted. The particular section of the Internal Revenue Code that applies to the Chamber could be obtained from the legal counsel for the Chamber of Commerce. City Attorney Flitner signified he will research and discuss the matter further with the Chamber legal counsel and report back to the City Council. 23. UNSCHEDULED PUBLIC APPEARANCES: Mayor Linda Spiro asked if there were any additional unscheduled public appearances at this time. No one responded. 24. ADJOURNMENT. Mayor Linda Spiro adjourned the meeting at approximately 11:27 p.m. Deputy City Clerk Mayor j h/mins:101497mn _I�F vis ED CITY OF ROHNERT PARK BILLS FOR APPROVAL October 28, 1997 copy to i -ODY TO - -- Copy zo I Hand Check Numbers 82711 Through 82729 $ 138,736.10 Dated October 8, 1997 Through October 15, 1997 Computer Checks Numbers 82730 Through 82759 8,788.90 Dated October 15, 1997 Hand Checks Numbers 82760 Through 82762 4,780.00 Dated October 16, 1997 Computer Checks Numbers 82763 Through 83005 406,100.38 Dated October 17, 1997 SUB -TOTAL $. 558,405.38 ADDITIONAL BILLS FOR APPROVAL: Copy Central $ 293.69 North Bay Title Co. 340.00 Santa Rosa Blueprint Service, Inc. 113.95 Cantarutti Electric Co. 5,058.00 American Public- Works Assn. 90.00 Baechtel Hudis, Inc. Project No. 1994-6 368.75 Project No. 1994-8 292.50 Project No. 1995-2 483.00 Project No. 1997-5 20.50 Project No. 1997-8 3,601.50, Project No. 1997-12 30.75 Subtotal Baechtel Hudis $ 4,797.00 SUB -TOTAL $ 10,692.64 TOTAL $ 569,098.02 CITY OF ROHNERT PARK BILLS FOR APPROVAL October 28, 1997 Hand Check Numbers 82711 Through 82729 Dated October 8, 1997 Through October 15, 1997 $138,736.10 Computer Check Numbers 82730 Through 82759 Dated October 15, 1997 $8,788.90 Hand Check Numbers 82760 Through 82762 Dated October 16, 1997 $4,780.00 Computer Check Numbers 82763 Through 83005 Dated October 17, 1997 $406,100.38 TOTAL $558;405.38 JOB ID VALUE S3FA3401 CHECK # 8271.3 82714 CITY OF ROHNERT PARI: VENDOR #/NAME 02S91 EMPLOYMENT DEVELOPMENT DEPT 09932 WESTERN BOOT STEAK HOUS£. CHECK TOTAL 19,963.52 550.00 82719 04658 JAMES *GRUNDMAN 12.00 82720 09912 PURE ENERGY PRODUCTIONS 375.00 .Q-V7'�1 noor-d f A"rUCCTMC. ,&Mill UCOM cel nn _ 52725 09936 BEST WESTERN AMERICANIA S64.30 82726 0640-9 DONALD *HARRINGTON 937.00 13 ' JOB ID VALUE S3FA3401 TTMF 07:49 IEXTRACT RECORD COUNT 21 PROCESS RECORD COUNT 21 CITY OF RONNERT PARK - 82734 09573 STEVE S. *BERGER D.D.S. 204.00 82735 09332 WILLIAM J. *BOHAN, D.M.D. 2,401.60 8273609333 FRANK J. *CERCONE D.M.D. 466.20 82737 tl9SiG W T *CONKLIN, D D S G2d 00 8273$ 0933$ ST':EPHE'ld D *DAVIS DDS INC . 6.— 82:739 0957::4 W'.;:REED WD:ICKI<NSON: .D.::M.D: 82740 093422 RICHARD *GRAHAM, DDS 48.00 82741 09343. WALTRAUT *GRAU, DDS PROF.COR. 416.90 827422 09518 MERCEDES_*HEITMAN, D.D.S. 72.00 82%43Q9345 LA.WRPi'CE DHENIG D D S IiVC }8d 00 i 82744 04802 JAMES T *HENLEY, D D S' 199;00 09346 GEORGE:: G.HENl 822746 09578 ROBERT P. *JEFFERS, D.D.S. 92.00 82747 09411 NI.ELS C. *JOHANSEN, D.D.S. 1,125.60 82748 09348 MARK S. *KRONCK£ D.D.S. 118.40 82749 .p993S ARMEN *KUPELIAtt, D D fi } 04:8d 82750 0935.0 DOUGLA'S C *OSTROWSKI, D D;S; 223 00 8751 09355 M6N;JRIR:IF DD5 45:00 822752 09S222 KENNETH J. *SHAW,. D.D.S. 14.40 82753 06566 DONALD R. *STEFFY, D.D.S. 200.00 82754 04384 MARTIN R. *STEIGNER, DDS 140.00 ..... 82755 09361. CtARLE'S it *STiRATTCEN DDS } 29 20 82':757 9 G3 IL F: x� E Z I S f 58:40 _ 82758 09366 JOHN F. *UNGUREN, D.D.S. 659.40 82759 09419 DONNA *YOCK, D.M.D. 48.00 JOB . ID VALUE S3FA3401 EXTRACT RECORD COUNT 49 PROCESS RECORD COUNT 49 CITY OF ROHNERT PARK ., S2762 00751 UNITED STATES POST OFFICE 3,000.00 82765 00245 101 INTERNATIONAL, INC. 3.53 82766 00506 ABLE FENCE COMPANY, INC. 129.00 82'7£7: fl4£0_$ AADEP9Y THEATRICAL. LIGST INC 153 51mlii 52770 09733 AIR OUCH PAGING 602.80 82771 07242 AM PRINTING COMPANY 69.88 82772 00017 AMERI-CRAFT 14.29 p2773`0$769 Am -G. NmLiNE� 84;29 8��?4 ....::....:::........<0:.0:0,,1.:- ..:...:...:...::.:.:: AN D : ROSS:::::.::::; ::.:...::...:..:...:.:::.:..... APiER I C:.. R,E C::AR 25' O0 1 01 32776 06996 ANIMAL CARE CENTER OF SONOMA 356.54 82778 03539 ARCHITECTURAL SVCS. & PRODUCTS 23,61$.00 82779 07501 ARDE:N INDUSTRIES 430.87 $27$0 :02021 A8S0 ATED. BUSINESS PRf}L�UCi:S 946 65 82781 OQ834 A7�T EASYL:INK ;$IERVICE 71 53 :..:. A:t1TO1wAT I C ::RAIN!: COMPANY <' .ELM 1770 65. _> 82783 08200 BRENDA K. *BACHMANN 46.43 82784 09190 BAECHTEL HUDIS INC. CONSULTING 9,874.00 82785 00033 BANNER ENTERPRISES INC. 89.65 82786... 0$89!7 . BARCLAYSPUBLISHERS c41 10' 82'787 05231 B'P,Y AREA A:IR Q'UALI TY �96fi9T iIS7 1 OB 30' 82789 00065 BIG 4 RENTS 388.30 82790 05965 BIKE HUT 16.58 82791 04916 CAN.DACE *BIRCHFIELD 725.00 x32792 062x;0 DIANA *i30N.INICI; 240: 00 s�793 ': '" 0998:0 BLIWER ;& As:SOGi':AtES; 20 QQ . 82795 07287 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB 125.00 82796 09628 SALLY *BRIAN 650.00 82797 08985 CAROL ANNE *BROWN 145.00 82:79$ 023b4 BUTLER S UNIFO!Ri`1S 37: 92 32799 .............. OQO$';9 C'A1 SKATE 82801 04505 UNIV. OF *CALIFORNIA REGENTS 165.00 82802 09686 CALIFORNIA STATE COMPUTER 7,066.49 82803 03542 CALIFORNIA, STATE OF 170.00 8204 M YTI4:R.:A.Tt3.R1' CgLTE:�aRT AAfA1c 1G;,41?; 50 82506. ,:; 0.9.72'5 RACH.E'L xCAREY :; 300<1 O.U' 82807 00521 CARL'S .BODY SHOP 767.88 82808 09825 CASEY CONSTRUCTION 23,136.75 82809 00096 CASTING RESTAURANT EQU.IPMENF 222.45 82815 06366 NANETTE *COATS 250.00 ' 82816 08702 COIT i78.G0 82817 09941 C.J. *COLLINS 25.00 818 071 G!0 COMP9UNITY .VOICE 82;1 9 0934 Gf3RRPRO CQ.MPAN!.IES .,SNC ' : 3, 431 2S 82821 06528 CRANE TRANSPORTATION GROUP 61852:50 82822 00124 DALE'S PROPERTY SERVICE 21690.00 82823 09135 CATHY *DAVIS 187.20 8�';$L4 0495;1 UPPLY'; DISCOUNT S;CP100_wit 82$25 0288:9.... DOUBLE DEC:;iSER CORi' 95 5 82:826 096Gi4 D'OU13L'ETREE..E�OTsEL i.33:. $9 : : ll 82827 19805 DOUBLETREE HOTEL 11331.00 82828 00149 DUST—TEX SERVICES, INC. 79.50 82829 09888 DYETTE & BHATIA13 396 G5 82$3Q ;0013.8 . E;&�i ELECTRIC 8 AiACHINEY, INC 39$ Q0; 82`831. 001 3G E:LECT'R I CAL; EQU'I PME,NT Ct3 , SNC 57': 7 t 88832 :''� 0544`1 ELECT€R i.CAL' SUP.:PLYf.SANTA Rt`tSA 229`. as SE833 07079 EMPIRE WASTE: MANAGEMENT 134.82 82834 03531 .ENVIRONMENTAL DYNAMICS 395.00 82835 08436 EVAN JOHNSON PHOTOGRAPHY 384.29 8�$3G 05734 EVERGREEN ENVIRONPiENTAt� 100' 00 8^c837 04953 EXPRESS PRINTi�IG :::.°: 332 7'1 82835' 09 p7 E.;; TE DED ESO 'fR E .:; 82839 08064 MICHELLE *FAHY 390.00 88840 0.4045 FAMILY SUPPORT DIVISION 125,.00 82841 03497 FISHMAN SUPPLY COMPANY 1,089.97 82542of04358 RQBERI i *FtIN3, PM A. 350'_tt0 82$43.......... 0007L' JOHN DfLITNER: 4:810; 04' 82844 ..>. <OG93"6 FOLEY 'B1:L:SAW I<NS7I;TUTE'> OF 71.::.25 __ 82845 01.498 FRIEDMAN BROS. 60.20 82846 09011 GARDNER'S AID 281.87 82847 07946 GOODE PRINTING & MAILING 43..00 8348 08975► MP►RY ,i0 *G`OSS i 31 59 82351 001 73 GRAINGE+� Ii�C 4, 827; 49 9 82853 08444 GROENIGER & COMPANY 11155.69 88854 00179 HANSEL FORD 306.62 82855 09846 HARLEQUIN COSTUME & DANCE 1,102.75 SCS�6 00003........... .. M`ICi�AEL *iiARROW 1',220 8i ;<.:. 027?;b W'�ALTH PLAN OF 1"HE. REDGIOOD� . 82859 06854 HOME DEPOT 594.93 82860 00189 BETTYJANE *#-TOTALING 3,412.50 82861 03285 HSC ELECTRONIC SUPPLY 211.15 VENDOR # /NAME CITY OF ROHNERT PARK DEMAND LIST DEP'I;AND ;DATA; ! 0'17197 CHECK TOTAL 82867' 02422 INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE 138.79 82568 01612 INTERSTATE BATTERIES 73.05 82869 09797 ISSEL'S GOLDEN WEST GLASS 428.09 82'70 07 I .I . D W.FSSON & ASSOCI ATS S t 79 85 HIG.GI1d5' ".:.:.:::;.. X99'; 04 52;572 _:; J:RNET.:..;5 7:0. 82.873 08103 JWC ENVIRONMENTAL 11;614.02 82874 .08871! KACFE'S WORLD OF WATER 140.00 8c2,875 0033 KELLY-MOORE PAINT COMPANY INC. 644.01 .... KEN *KENNE:MER, MFC 3b0 00 82'177 0985) c DANNY *KOVAGK�.' .. 21 9278 ....::::...:::::: . 0.535;2 ...... . KOZY ..HUTQ GLASS....B 1PHQ;STERY 31; 02__..' 82879 03071 KZST-FM 100 1,358.00 52580 04687 L.C. ACTION POLICE SUPPLY 122.97 82881 04818 THE *LAS 246.71 82<882; 00805 LAMER BUS,INE'S PR'i}DUCTS 47 26 82:$83 01 98,;1 :. LE EtAL L I STER ' S'. 91 3 7Ca 52'854 0956:5. LAURA..L 82885 09942 MONIQUE *LIGHTELL 4.00 82886 00217 LIGHTNING POWDER COMPANY, INC. 219.70 82887 02.180 LINCOLN EQUIPMENT INC. 193.85 5255 09A9:SANDRA MLIP:ITZ 205':33 8285 0500;0 MACIAS, GINI &,COMPANY 5,134,00 52590. 0994:3 RQStMARY 1`1AK.I. 82891 02573 MANLY GMC TRUCK 31.18 82892 09829 MARIN SUPPLY COMPANY 11594.78 82893 06447 MARKELL INC. 479.45 82894 03102 MARY`S PIZZA S:IiAGK; 24;98 .. d2b2;1. MASELLI +.SONS:, IN;C 134.99 32$96. 0932::1 :..: ;: M;C CANN. MACHINE & :;MFG. _ GS. 00 .......... . .8289.7 092223 METRO.NET 150.00 82898 02845 MON'rANA HAWK' INC.. 96.91 82899 09910 MOSBY 61.66 5200 0949';1 MUNICIPAL ELEGTRON':IC :INC 11T87 82;;102 0267; NAPA AUTO ;PARIS 92'903 0023:4 NRiIO'NAL .FIRE t'ROT>EGTION ASSQC_; 8.2904 00237 JOSEPH D. *NETT ER 420.00 52905 02714 NEUERBUR.G'S GARMENT LETTERING 49.99 82906 08025 NORCAL BUILDING MATERIALS 250..29 5?907 0350;8 .......... 82108 0479'.0 AitiRTH' :BA' GORR;ORATi= HEPtL,TH , 44, 00 $2ig09 OG02#G ,. NIORTH;::'BAY€7RU.GKWOi2KS 46?:;' 00:: 82910 05790 NORTHBAY VENDING WEST 73.50 82911 00.:93 NORTHERN COAST OFFICIALS ASSOC 462.50 8291.3 080199 OFFICE DEPOT' 3,235.59 82919 00340 PACIFIC BELL 109.20 82920 07776 PACIFIC BELL SECURITY 250.00 82921 00253 PACIFIC GAS AND ELECTRIC 13.42 s�c922 0301:0' PACIFIC SOFTWA:REERVLG$ 487 29 V:L.;9L� ,0L248 ,iAMtES *PAR:Pt :.;; :. 159: 51 82<84 Q 91 5>9 Olt SK .:TRAF'F I C .SI GMA'L 4< 433.? 29 82925 07884 PETRO TECH 238.80__ $2926 002.59 PETTY CASH 105.06 82928 00260 PETTY CASH 210.70 loss 82:929 0464;5 PET1Y ;CASH; 76.' 32 86:930 098:5 PHYI4 CONTROL; CORPORATION : 139,:70 $21:931 =.034E'8 ;.:. P'IA�ZA COP�ISTRUCT.IO`IV _ � 360:<.00 82932 09944 EDWARD R.*POPOVICH 175.00 82933 02549 POST TOOL 579.40 32934 09551 PRAXAIR 32.40 82935 0951'4 PRE PAID LIEGAL SERVIGE'S, ItG 149'r 50 mimic8�?93G : 0026;9 T}£ *;P?RESSj DEM4'0CRAT $2<93? 09'945 A!LLIE1111'.*FWill NCE..< 200:.00 82938 00936 PRINT STOP 65.62 822939 06553 PRYOR RESOURCES INC.. 149.00 82940 00767 PURITY PRODUCTS COMPANY 171.57 P2'�141 0?37:3 Q4PIP� GOi�E PUBLICATIQNB- 3943 0063 R;AI.EY'' S SUPERPW'ARKETN.27t 5 1 6..::.. $2:944: Oi 9'�^c A i R TER S'E Ai „:: 300!:.0:. >.. ... 82945 04908 REDWOOD LOCK 247.68 8946 00263 REDWOOD OIL COMPANY 1,112.24 32947 05425 REDWOOD SANITARY SERVICE 371.34 $2:�J4$ _ 096$,8 REGINA `S tJ;ASH � FQL.D 72` 25 82`49' 0571;1 DE} *REID: 240', G4' 82951 08470 HARRY *ROBERTS. 92.50 82952 04555 ROGER WILCO MARKET 9.00 82953 00372 ROHNERT PARK CAR WASH 85.00 SAMOS! 00262 lm988 ROHNERT PARK P= IREMiAN' S : ASSHIM OQ 8295 ° 06494 ROHNE`R T PA.Pi; TIRE ,& AU;CO CN TR 143 9t 0. 82957 00635 ROTO -ROOTER SEWER 6 DRAIN 218.00 82.958 00724 SAFEGUARD BUSINESS SYSTEMS INC 222.20 8959 02069 SAFETY-KLEEN CORP 1,787.00 82°960 0461':4 SAN JOS>M STATE; UNI'VP"RSI'f 296 Q0 8;963 095$6 SfiNDBORN TREE S1rRitCES' 4'.7$'1.2 !9Z 091 �? 1 8`ANTA Rflu'14' BEPi'R iNG> CORP 286" 87 8.2963 00297 SANTA ROSA FIRE EQUIP. INC. 192.61 82964 08553 SANTA ROSA 'FORD NEW HOLLAND 73.90 82972 07204 SHUTTERBUG 676.55 82973 09946 WENDY *SOLANO 24.00 82974 06184 SONOMA COUNTY INDEPENDENT 145.00 82'975 03490COUNTY OF 'kON(Qi'tA 00' 0 2S0 82";97fi 068T5 COUNTY OF'SOPIDMA 69 44' 82;977 . 003�L SONOMA COUNTY :WATEiR .AGENCY;;: 82', 1 13< 4t . .:: 82978 07098 SONOMA COUNTY WINERIES ASSOC. 10,000.00 82979 03963 SPECIAL_ "T" FIRE EQUIPMENT 1,122.95 82.980 02590 SUNSET LINEN SERVICE: 535.00 82;981 060] . St1PER' SECil.R CO'MPAPdY 2G3: G3 INDUSTRIE'y, 82198.3 .. 074015 TARGET . STORES 822984 --04119 TESCO 810.00 82985, 09742 REBECCA *THOMPSOAI 1,150..00 82986 02618 THREE T EQUIPMENT.COMPANY 73.10 82J87 0031;5 U. DS 1 63: i2 0860;1 TIRE RECYCLING 4ti, 00' 989 ;:0549>5 TULARE .CO; 1-AM`I! Y _<SUPP:3RT' 48. S' S0 82990 00312 UNITED.PARCE'L SERVICE 67.56 82991 00323 UNITED WAY 208.00 8299205305 VICTOR MEDICAL COMPANY 870.68 82993' _ .. 01 1 Q0 V'INTAGE WRTER 4,30RF4S SUPPLY ._... 233: 88 82'994 0663_Q WALMART 82:995 " 044T:9 WEST : PUBL I<Sh I RIG . C0IMFANY 27: t 4. ,:. 82996 00328 WESTERN FARM CENTER 604.57 82997 04632 WHEELER & ZAMARONI 2,244.60 82998. 06516 WILLIAMS COMMUNICATIONS1,00.00 82'999 0994'7 WINE COUNTRY 'T!R0- BADOU'RS 17� 00 $3.Q 00 097,a W'R1 LES; 1::01 `;;:.:.:: ;:: ;,: 287:: 83......::::.::::';:.;; 83:1001 ..: XERO)5 :.b- RPORAT<ION 83002 07518 YAMAS CONTROLS, INC. 140.00 83003 .04715 YARDBIRD'S 299.41 83004 01139 Z.A.P. MANUFACTURING, INC. 161.1.8 Total Demand: 410,880.38 JOB ID VALUE S3FA3401 CITY OF ROHNERT PARK EXTRACT RECORD COUNT 568 PROCESS RECORD COUNT 568 x. :: :...:...'.. ....:. ... k INTER -OFFICE MEMORANDUM To: The Honorable Mayor and Members of the City Council ` From: Michael L. Harrow City Manager Netter City Engineer Gaffney Finance Director City Attorney Flitner Assistant City Manager Leivo Accountant/Auditor Raymond Accounting Supervisor Lipitz Management Analyst Fogle Date: October 17, 1997 CASH BALANCES AS OF AUGUST 31, 1997 General Fund Payroll Account Traffic Safety Fund Motor Vehicle License Fees R.E.M.I.F. Special Water Connection Fee Fund Per Acre For Development Fee Fund Water/Wastewater-Fee Fund(Dev. Imp. Fund) Sewer Service Connection Fee Fund Water/Wastewater Fee Fund(Spec. Sewer Conn. Fund) Water Utility Fund Sewer Utility Fund Garbage Utility Fund Garbage Utility Fund -Commercial Set-aside Fund General Fund -Refundable Deposits Utility Fund -Refundable Deposits Improvement Project Fund Gas Tax Fund: Sec. 2107 Maint./Const. Sec. 2107.5 Engineering Sec. 2106 Const./Maint. Sec. 2105 FAU/Washed Funds SB 140 Transportation Development Act(TDA) ; - --- Capital Outlay Fund I.S.T.E.A. Fund Local Law Enforcement Block Grant Fund AB 3229 (COPS) Fund Fire Benefit Assessment(Measure M) Fund Annexation Fees Copeland Creek Drainage Facilities Fund = Debt Service Fund Traffic Signals Fund .Vehicle Abatement Funds Performing Arts Center Endowment Fund Dental Self-insurance Fund Petty'Cash General Fund Reserve' Reserve For Self -Insured Losses Reserve For Retired Employee Medical Reserve For P.E.R.S. Costs -Public Safety Employees '-=^ 'Reserve For P.E.R.S. Costs -Miscellaneous Employees Reserve for Dev. of Add'I Rec. Facilities Miscellaneous Reserve(CDA Loan Principal Repayment) Reserve For Housing Programs Reserve For Active Employee Medica! Sub -Total Operating Cash Special Enforcement Unit -South Deferred Comp. Fund-GWB(457)-F/T Employees Deferred Comp. Fund-GWB(457)-P/T Employees Deferred Comp: Fund-iCMA(401a) Deferred Comp. Fund-ICMA(457) Cash with Fiscal Agent (Assessment Refunding Fund) Cash with Fiscal Agent (Earned Interest Fund) Cash with Fiscal Agent (Refunding Dist 1983-10A) Cash with Fiscal Agent (1993 Consolidated Refunding District) Itt011If-I :I ($876,199.00) 0.00 10,367.03 291,769.05 (38,215.20) $150,510.65 6,000.00- 896,453.48 890,595.36 0.00 0.00 ($612,278.12) 919,742.55 2,549,088.80 92,267.78 5,517,247.60 92,265.79 2,779,148.32 2,613,959.67 149,372.98 408,339.65 114,398.47 86,788.00 272,090.58 1,943,559.49 4,000.00 911,822.46 0.00 95,958.41 73,987.92 277,862.51 49,840.00 . 59,306.40 0.00 860,564.26 34,140.90 916,750.00 -39,015.36 "3,225.00 1,916,865.00 1,850,770.00 461,000.00 369,003.00 430,328.00 331,257.00 729,085.00 559,377.00 3na -7,va 00 27,206,882.78 34,639.38 1, 725, 367.10 -148;349.91 --1-j-707,-853.56 5,730,955.78 8,996.34 27,162.77 32,937.72 502,105.00 $37,125,250.34 v CASH DISTRIBUTION AS OF AUGUST 31, 1997 Petty Cash . Payroll Checking Account -Exchange Bank General Checking Account -Exchange Bank + Utility Checking Account -Exchange Bank :_j. __-Recreation Checking Account -Exchange Bank------ Parking Citation Account: Bank of America Subtotal Petty Cash and Checking Accounts Def. Comp.-F/T Employees: Great Western Def. Comp. -PR Employees: Great Western Def. Comp. for Employees:, ICMA(401a) Def. Comp. for Employees: ICMA(457) Subtotal Deferred Compensation Accounts Investment Accounts -See Schedule Attached $3,225.00 0.00 1.110% (749,018.41) 1.110% 1,576.78 �..- 1-.110%. — --------5;706.06 10,975.71 (727,534.86) 4.350% 1,725,367.10 3.990% 148,349.91 6.125% 1,707,853.56 6.125% 5,730,955.78 9,312,526.35 28,504,099.74 Cash With Fiscal Agent (Assessment Refunding Fund) @ 5.494% .8,996.34 _ Cash With Fiscal Agent (Earned Interest Fund) @ 5.494% 27,162.77 Subtotal -Cash With Fiscal Agent 36,159.11 . Total Cash Distribution $37,1251250.34 Investment Yield for AUGUST 1997 5.937% -- CITY OF ROHNERT PARK -SCHEDULE OF INVESTMENTS -AUGUST 31, 1997 Source of Investment Maturity Interest Par Value of Current Mkt. Val. Investment Investment Institution Type Date Rate Investment Of Investment Valuation { Exchange Bank Savings Passbook Svgs N/A 2.02% $32,000.00 $32,000.00 Note (1) Mercantile National Bank Cert.of Deposit 09/08/97 @ 6.20% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) ...':!----First Fed.Svgs.Bk.of S.Rafael _CerLof-Deposit­ 09/10/97-__@--6.10° "` 99;000:00 - ----99;000.00 Note (1) Metropolitan Bank Cert of Deposit 10/07/97 @ 6.00% 99,000.00 99;000.00 Note (1) Sunwest Bank Cert.of Deposit 10/20/97 @ 6.01% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) First Bk. of Beverly Hills Cert.of Deposit 10/29/97 @ 6.10% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Cenlar Federal Savings Bank Cert.of Deposit 11/17/97 @ 5.96% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Quad City Bank Cert.of Deposit. 11/17/97 @ 6.15% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Advanta Financial Bank Cert.of Deposit 12/02/97 @ 6.25% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Broadway Federal Bank Cert.of Deposit 12/15/97 @ 6.00% 99,000.00, 99,000.00 Note (1) Community Thrift & Loan Cert.of Deposit 12/21/97 @ 5.90% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Pacific Business Bank Cert.of Deposit 12/29/97 @ 6.05% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Torrance Bank Cert.of Deposit 01/06/98 @ 5.80% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Superior Bank Cert.of Deposit 01/20/98 @ 6.00% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Redwood Bank Cert.of Deposit 02/11/98 @ 6.00% 500,000.00 500,000.00 Note (1) Life Savings Bank Cert.of Deposit 02/12/98 @ 5.98% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Q Bank Cert.of Deposit 02/13/98 @ 6:00% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Associates Natl. Bank Cert.of Deposit 03/04/98 @ 6.04% 100,000.00 100,000.00 Note (1) First Natl.Bk.of San Diego Cert.of-Deposit 03/22/98 @ 5.60% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Napa National Bank Cert.of Deposit 03/27/98 @ 5.75% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Atlantic Bank & Trust Cert.of Deposit 03/27/98 @ 6.20% 99,000.00, 99,000.00 Note (1) Pocahontas Federal S&L Cert.of Deposit 04/01/98 @ 6.17% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Rancho Dominguez Bank Cert.of Deposit 04/01/98 @ 6.25% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Pan American Bank Cert.of Deposit 04/03/98 @ 6.10% 99,000.00. 99,000.00 Note (1) Advanta National Bank Cert.of Deposit 04/10/98 @ 6.20% 100,000.00 100,000.00 Note (1) Family Savings Bank Cert.of Deposit 04/14/98 @ 6.75% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Citizens Bank Cert.of Deposit 04/15/98 @ 6.25% 99,000.00' 99,000:00 Note (1) Cole Taylor Bank Cert.of Deposit 04/25/98 @ 6.21% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Royal Thrift & Loan Cert.of Deposit 05/01/98 @ 6.10% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Citizens Thrift & Loan - Cert.of Deposit 05/05/98 @ 6.06% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Golden Security T&L Cert.of Deposit 05/11/98 @ 6.20% 90,000.00 90,000.00 Note (1) . Milwaukee Western Bank Cert.of Deposit 05/14/98 @ 6.30% 99,000.00 99,000.00 - Note (1) Citizens State Bank Cert.of Deposit 05/25%98 @ 6.30% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) B.P.D. Bank Cert.of Deposit 05/25/98 @ 6.31% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Cypress Coast Bank Cert.of Deposit 05/26/98 @ 6.00% 99,000.00 99,000.00- Note (1) Mountain West Bank Cert.of Deposit 05/28/98 @ 6.35% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) :Chevy Chase Fed. Svgs. Bk. Cert.of Deposit 05/28/98 @ 6.35% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Saratoga National:Bank Cert.of Deposit' 06/01/98 @ 6.10% 300,000.00 300,000.00 Note (1) Capital Bank Cert.of Deposit _06/09/98 @ 6.35% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Girard Savings Bank Cert.of Deposit 06/18/98 @ 5.95% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Franklin Thrift & Loan Cert.of Deposit 07/16/98 @ 6.10% 99,000.00 ,99,000.00 Note (1) Republic Bank Cert.of Deposit 07/28/98 @ 6.16% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) First Bank of Brunswick Cert.of Deposit 07/31/98 @ 6.32% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Foothill Independent Bank Cert.of Deposit 08/06/98 @ 6.25% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Bank of the West Cert.of Deposit 08/21/98 @ 6.30% 300,000.00 300,000.00 Note (1) First Charter Bank Cert.of Deposit 08/21/98 @ 6.00% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Franklin Bank Cert.of Deposit 08/28/98 @ 6.20% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Cen Fed Bank Cert.of Deposit 09/07/98 @ 6.15% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Edgartown National Bank Cert.of Deposit 10/06/98 @ 6.25% 99,000.00 _ "99,000.00 Note (1) Valencia National Bank Cert.of Deposit 10/15/98 @ 6.20% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Bank of the West 'Cert.of Deposit 10/29/98 @ 6.30% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Bank of San Francisco Cert.of Deposit 10/22/98 @ 6.20% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) First Credit Bank Cert.of Deposit 10/26/98 @ 5.95% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) First Republic Thrift & Loan Cert.of Deposit 10/26/98 @ 6.25% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Foothill Independent Bank Cert.of Deposit 11/06/98 @ 6.30% 300,000.00 300,000.00 Note (1) Summit S&L Cert.of Deposit 11/08/98 @ 6.00% 99,000.00. 99,000.00 Note (1) Foothill Independent Bank Cert.of Deposit 11/18/98 @ 6.30% 400,000:00 400,000.00 Note (1) Saratoga National Bank Cert.of Deposit 12/10/98 @ 6.15% 200,000.00 , - 200,000.00 Note (1) Sierra West Bank Cert.of Deposit 12/11/98 @ 6.01% 99,000.00 .99,000.00 Note (1) Quaker City Federal S&L Cert.of Deposit 12/16/98 @ 6.20% 99,000.00. 99,000.00 Note (1) Saratoga National Bank Cert.of Deposit 12/21/98 @ 6.00% 99,000.00 ='99,000.00 Note (1) Pomona First Fed. Bank Cert.of Deposit 01/11./99 V 6.25% 300,000.00 300,000.90 Note (1) Pomona First Fed. Bank Cert.of Deposit 01/13/99 @ 6.25%° 500,000.00 - 500,000.00 Note (1) Valencia National Bank Cert.of Deposit 01/26/99 @ 6:25% 300,000.00 300,000.00 Note (1) Franklin Bank Cert.of Deposit 02/15/99 @ 6.05% 300,000.00 300,000.00 Note (1) Investors Community Bank Cert.of Deposit 02/22/99 @ 6.18% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) First National Bank of Marin Cert.of Deposit 02/23/99 @ 6.20% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Peoples Bank Cert.of Deposit 03/01/99 @ 6.22% 99,000.00 ._ _ 99,000.00 Note (1) Delaware Savings -Bank Cert.of Deposit 03/01/99 @ 6.20% 99,000.00 ;..:;•- -_ 99,000.00 Note (1) Life Savings Bank Cert.of Deposit 03/11/99 @ .6.20% 99,000.00 : '- ::99,000:00 -Note (1) Gateway Bank Cert.of Deposit 03/12/99 @ 6.25% 99,000.00 99,000.00. Note (1) Bankfirst N.A. Cert.of Deposit 03/15/99 @ 6.21% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Pacific State Bank Cert.of Deposit 03/22/99 @ 6.30% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) State Bank of Newburg Cert.of Deposit 03/25/99 @ 6.36% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) City National Bank Cert.of Deposit 04/05/99 @ 6.30% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Orchard Federal Savings Cert.of Deposit 04/05/99 @ 6.40% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Oakwood Deposit Bank Cert.of Deposit 04/08/99 @ 6.50% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) First Liberty Bank Cert.of Deoosit 04/15/99 (c -_D 6.52% 99.000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Home -Svgs. of America. Cert.of Deposit 04/19/99 6.19% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) International Bank of Miami Cert.of Deposit 04/28/99 6.55% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Pomona First -Fed. Bank Cert.of Deposit 05/24/99 �•.:, 6.1.0% 100,000.00 100,000.00 Note (1) Provident Bank of MD Cert.of Deposit 05/13/99 6.25% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Downey Savings & Loan Cert.of Deposit 06/28/99 '6.25% 400,000.00 400,000.00 Note (1) Great Financial Bank Cert.of Deposit 08/05/99 @ 6.24% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) j ---First-Nebraska Bank - -Cert.of-Deposit - 08/06/99 -@ 6:25% 99;000.00 -- 99-000.00.- Note (1) FNMA Med.Term Note Cert.of Deposit 08/18/99 6:23% 1;000;000.00 996660-00 Note (2) Franklin Bank . . Cert.of Deposit 08/19/99 5.95% 400,000.00 400,000:00 Note (1) Affinity Thrift & Loan Cert.of Deposit 10/04/99 6.30% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Eaton Federal Savings Bank Cert.of Deposit 12/27/99 6.50% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Advanta National Bank Cert.of Deposit 02/26/00 6.40% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) MBNA America Bank Cert.of Deposit 02/28/00 6.35% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) First Deposit National Bank Cert.of Deposit 02/28/00 @ 6.30% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Providian National Bank Cert.of Deposit 02/28/00 @ 6.30% 100,000.00 100,000.00 Note (1) Bank of Mt. Vernon Cert.of Deposit 03/06/00 @ 6.50% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) First National Bank N.D. Cert.of Deposit 03/06/00 @ 6.50% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Ocwen Federal Bank Cert.of Deposit 03/06/00 @ 6.45% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Brownsville Bank Cert.of Deposit 03/20/00 @ 6.45% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) First Central Bank Cert.of Deposit 04/10/00 @ 6.66% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) National Republic Bank Cert.of Deposit 05/30/00 @ 6.91% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Citizens Fed. Svgs. Bank Cert.of Deposit 08/28/00 @ 6.50% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Federal Home Loan Bank Med.Term Note 02/21/01 @ 5.75% 1,000,000.00 987,190.00 Note (2) Family Federal Savings Cert.of Deposit 03/12/01 @ 6.63% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) U.S. Treasury Note U.S. Treas. Note 11/30/01 (0 6.07% 992,500.00 987,500.00 Note (2) Federal Home Loan Bank Multi Step-up Nt 03/25/02 @ 6.40% 1,000,000.00 1.,003,175.00 Note (2) Cross Country. Bank - Cert.of Deposit 07/25/02 @ 6.70% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) First Natl. Bk. of the Rockies Cert.of Deposit '08/08/02 @ 6.70% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) State of Calif.-LAIF Pooled Investmts N/A @ 5.76% 10,851,250.10 10,851,250.10 Note (3) Sonoma Co.lnvestmt. Pool Pooled Investmts N/A @ 5.49% 87,306.92 87,306.92 Note (4) Subtotal $27,969,057.02 $27,961,082.02 1983-10 Ref. Dist. Res.-So.Co. @ 5.49% 32,937.72 31,675.69 Note (5) 1993 Consol.Ref.Dist.-So.'Co. @ 5.49% 502,105.00 502,105.00 Note (5) Totals$28,434,862.71 Note (1) - These are investments in Certificates of Deposit. Current Market Value and Par Value are typically equal. Note (2) Gilford Securities current market values as of August 31, 1997 are presented. ( Note 3)These are funds invested in the Local Agency Investment Fund, State of California. Current Market Value and Par Value are typically equal. Interest is received quarterly and the Par Value remains the same. Note (4) These are funds invested in the Sonoma County Investment Pool. Current Market Value and Par Value are typically equal. Interest is received quarterly and the Par Value remains the same: Note (5) These funds are being held by Sonoma County acting as a Fiscal Agent for the City of Rohnert Park. IMPROVEMENT PROJECT FUND .:. Fiscal Year 1997/98 Summary of Revenue & Expenditures .__--- 4 Balance @ Current Fiscal Year Balance @ Project No. and Description 30 -Jun -97. Revenue Expenditures 31 -Aug -97 1977-04 Transport Avenue Ext.A.D. 29,487.98 0.00 0.00 29,487.98 1978-01 SnyderLn/Hinebaugh Cr A.D. 23,319.67 0.00 0.00 23,319.67 1979-05 Classic Ct. Assess.Dist. 8,387.21 0.00 0.00 8,387.21 1979-10 Laguna Verde Assess.Dist. 11,122.68 0.00 0.00 11,122.68 1983-10 Professional Ctr Dr.A.D. 18,048.39 0.00 0.00 18,048.39 1987-18 S Corp. Yard Fuel Tanks 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1988-04 Sewer Bypass 0.00 0.00 0:00 0.00 1988-20 Pump Station Improvement 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 ! 1989-05 Underground Tank Removal 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1991-04 RPX/101 O/Cross-Phase II 131,107.17 0.00 6,157.50 124,949.67 1993-06 Street Lighting Acquisition (525,603.00) 0.00 0.00 (525,603.00) 1994-01 Adrian Dr. Undrgrd Conv 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1994-05 R.P. Stadium Imprvmnts 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1994-06 RPX Widening -Phase 1 0.00 0.00 24,987.91 (24,987.91) 1994-07 Snyder Lane Bikepath 4,606.68 0.00 0.00 4,606.68 1994-08 M Park -Phase II 0.00 0.00 2,530.00 (2,530.00) 1995-04 Animal Shltr. Landscaping 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1995-06 Portables at the Stadium 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1995-07 Rubberized RR Crossing 150,000.00 0.00 0.00 150,000.00 1995-08 WW Pump -LUST Cleanup 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1995-09 P/S North -LUST Cleanup 0.00 0.00 . 0.00 0.00 1996-01 . RPX Interchng. Improvmts. 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 -1996-03 Coleman Creek Repairs 0.00 0.00 1,872.15 (1,872.15) 1996-04 RPX Streetlights 0.00 .0.00 19,029.20 (19,029.20) 1996-06 Commerce Blvd. Widening 0.00 0.00 6,749.67 .(6,749.67) 1996-09 Roberts Lake Rd. Signal 97,847.44 -0.00 0.00 97,847.44 1996-10 City Hall Roof1,498.00 0.00 0.00 1,498.00 1996-11 Overlays Program -1996 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 1996-12 RPX/Snyder Landscaping 473.44 0.00 0.00 473.44 1997-01 Traf. Sig.-Alison@Comm. 0.00 0.00 986.75 (986.75) 1997-05 Hinebaugh Cr BPOverlay 0.00 0.00 630.50 (630.50) - 1997-06 Toilet Replacemt Program 0.00 0.00 113,599.39 (11.3,599.39) 1997-11 Overlays -1997 0.00 0.00 8,213.25 (8,213.25) 1997-12 Animal Shelter Map 0.00 0.00 5,981.25 (5,981.25) Sub -total ($49,704.34) $0.00 $190,737.57 ($240,441.91) Add: Temporary Funding From Sewer Connection Fee Fund(Council Authorized) For Purchase of Street Light System(Project 1993-06) $525,603.00 Account Receivable at August 31, 1997(Re: Project 1997-06 for Toilet Upgrades) (240.00) Account Receivable at August 31, 1997(Reimbursement due Project"IM-06) (12,830.51) Total Improvement Project Fund $272,090.58 IMPROVEMENT PROJECT FUND Fiscal Year 1997/98 Recap of Project Expenditures Current Mo. Fiscal Year Project No. and Description: Expenditures Expenditures 1977-04 Transport Ave Ext. A.D. 1978-01 SnyderLn/HinebaughCr A.D. 1979-05 Classic Court Assess. Dist. 1979-10 Laguna Verde Assess. Dist. 1983-10 Professional Center Drive 1987-18 Corp. Yard Fuel Tanks 1988-04 Sewer Bypass 1988-20 Pump Station Improvement -1989-05 Undergmd Tank Removal 1991-04 RPX/101 O/Cross-Phase II , 1993-06 Street Lighting Acquisition 1994-01 Adrian Dr. Undrgrd Conv. 1994-05 R.P. Stadium Improvmnts 1994-06 RPX Widening -Phase I 1994-07 Snyder Ln.-Bikepath -1094-08. M Park -Phase II 1995-04 Animal Shltr. Landscaping 1995-06 Portables At the Stadium 1995-07 Rubberized RR Crossing 1995-08 WW Pump -LUST Cleanup 1995-09 P/S North -LUST Cleanup 1996-01 RPX Interchng. Improvmts. 1.996-03 Coleman Creek Repairs ' 1996-04 RPX Streetlights _ 1996-05 Flores Av. Storm Drain 1996-06 Commerce Blvd. Widening 1996-07 Gladstone Chan.Reconst. 1996-08 Golf Course Drainage 1996-09 Roberts Lake Signal _ .1996-10 City Hall Roof 1996-11 Overlays Program -1996 1996-12 RPX/Snyder Landscaping . 1996-13 E.Cotati Av.Median Mods. - 1997-01 Traffic Signals -1997 1997-05 Hinebaugh Crk BP Overlay 1997-06 Toilet Replacement Prog. 1997-11 Overlays -1997 1997-12 Anim.Shelter Map 0.00 TOTALS Expenditures Total Est. Total Project Expenditures 0.00 0.00 1,275,422.74 1,305,000 0.00 0.00 572,379.87 595,700 0.00 0.00 157,194.99 165,600 0.00 0.00 1,521,881.45 1,533,000 0.00 0.00 530,849.06 548,900 0.00 0.00. 510,674.26 581,100 0.00 0.00 3,653.35 75,700 0.00 0.00 3,255,933.72 3,301,800 _ 0.00 0.00 79,052.29 300,000 6,157.50. 6,157.50 75,558.61 11885,000 . 0.00 0.00 0.00 750,900 0.00 0.00 34,795.75 40,000 0.00 0.00 3,930.86 12,000 24,987.91 24,987.91 532,050.84 600,000 0.00 0.00 152,917.80 350,000 2,530.00 .2,530.00 8,643.25 -185,000 0.00 0.00 1,667.31 4i. 80,000 0.00 0.00 24,598.86 30,000 0.00 0.00 0.00 60,000 0.00 0.00 549.20 50,000 0.00 0.00 253.05 50,000 0.00 0.00 5,588.00 700,000 0.00 1,872.15 38,622.00 80,000 0.00 19,029.20 55,062.75 50,000 0.00 0.00 17,813.09 20,000 0.00 6,749.67 29,110.68 25,000 0.00 0.00 6,715.00 20,000 0.00 0.00 17,525.00 20,000 0.00 0.00 7,486.81 100,000 0.00 0.00 48,502.00 50,000 0.00 "0.00 244,973.05 300,000 0.00 0.00 2,595.09 30,000 0.00 0.00 35,781.79 40,000 •869.75 986.75 10,858.50 60,000 513.50 630.50 5,637.75 50,000 107,399.39 113,599.39 116,638.82 450,000 8,213.25 8,213.25 13,083.25 450,000 5,981.25 51981.25 5,981.25 8,000 .$156,652.55 $190,737.57 $9,403,982.09 $14,952,700 11. CAPITAL OUTLAY FUND Fiscal Year 1997/98 gummary of Revenue -and Expenditures_.._.. As of August 31, 1997 Balance @ Current Fiscal Year Balance @ CAPITAL OUTLAY FUND: 30 -Jun -97 Revenue Expenditures 31 -Aug -97 Neighborhoods A & B $31,950.00 $0.00 $0.00 $31,950.00 Colegio Vista Area 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Ladybug Area -0.00 0.00 0.00 0:00 Area West of Freeway 34,140.00 3,300.00 0.00 371440.00 Eagle Park Area 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Dorotea Park Area 991.63 0.00 0.00 991.63 Sunrise Park Area 6,440.00 0.00 0.00 6,440.00 Mt.Shadows/Coleman Valley 13,965.00 0.00 0.00 13,965.00 Rohnert Foothills (Area G) 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 S.of E.Cotati Ave.(M Section) 75,186.72 14,700.00 0.00 89,886.72 Foothills _ 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 R Section 10,440.23 0.00 0.00 10,440.23 Community Facilities .509,321.97 17,600.00 0.00 526,921.97 Open Space 186,266.91 9,800.00 0.00 196,066.91 Subtotal $868,702.46 $45,400.00 $0.00 $914,102.46 Less: Accounts Receivable (Re: 4H of Sonoma Co. Deferred Fees) (2,280.00) Total Capital Outlay Fund $911,822.46 RESOLUTION NO. 97- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK SUPPORTING "AMERICA RECYCLES DAY" - NOVEMBER 15, 1997 WHEREAS, in the tradition of Earth Day, public and private organizations are in hopes of increasing public awareness about recycling; and WHEREAS, the 1998 "American Recycles Day" campaign will have four major messages, those being: (1) Bring your own bag - to reduce the number of bags taken from store check-outs; (2) Buy products made with recycled materials - to increase the sale of products made with recycled content; (3) Buy the largest size you can use - to increase the sale of larger sizes and decrease the sale of small and/or individually wrapped items; and (4) Buy long lasting and reusable products - to increase the sale of long lasting and reusable products; and WHEREAS, the City Council of the City of Rohnert Park is aware of the necessity to keep recycling programs working and the value of encouraging and educating Americans regarding the benefits of recycling. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that all citizens be be made aware as to the positive effects of recycling and the City Council of the City of Rohnert Park urges Rohnert Park residents to put into practice recycling efforts for the future of our world and our planet. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that Saturday, November 15, 1997, is hereby declared "America Recycles Day" in the .City of Rohnert Park. DULY AND REGULARLY ADOPTED this 28th day of October, 1997. ATTEST: CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Deputy City Clerk Mayor FLORES ------MACKENZIE REILVI VIDAK-NIIARTINEZ SPIRO AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: SP Recyclingi`© 41 S-SS4-3400 T25/97 TO: Bay Area City and County Shop Smart Coordinators FROM: . Lisa Jolliffe. Shop Smart Program Coordinator SUBJECT: 1998 Shop Smart Campaign RO 8/5/97 (DS:26 PM 1/3 The 1998 Shop Smart program is quickly taking shape. I would like to take this opportunity to update you on a number of items, in particular, the exciting changes scheduled for 1998. 1. After much discussion within the working group and with participating jurisdictions, it has been decided that the 1998 campaign will not ULil1Le the m-sture promotional elements -- shelf tags and display units/ brochures in particular. This decision was made as a result of jurisdictions' frustration with regard to lack of store manager support; coop era tion and concerns regarding limited personnel resources. With the elimination of an in-store presence, the 1998 campaign is geared to become much more of a media campaign -- utilising mediums such as newspaper, radio and television. An advertising agency is currently reviewing the revised campaign, along with the campaign's estimated advertising budget, to best determine the appropriate "mix" of television, radio and newspaper. The only in-store presence scheduled for 1998 is the use of printed shopping bags -- the shopping bags are available at no cost to the campaign and survey results indicate they are highly visible. 1997 campaign survey results identified the 1/26/97 comic wrap as the campaign's #1 recognized promotional element. As a result, a comic wrap is scheduled to be placed in the following newspapers during each Sunday of the four week campaign: San Francisco Examiner &Chronicle, San Jose Mercury News and the Alameda News Group newspapers (Oakland Tribune Metro, Alameda Times Star, Daily Review, Argus, Tri -Valley Herald and San Ramon Valley Herald.) The format of the comic wrap is not yet determined, however, we are currently looking into the possibility of working with cartoonists who would create a cartoon/cartoon strip unique to the campaign. The comic wrap will also include coupons for products which fit within the focus of the campaign. Examples of such products may include recycled plastic content trash bags, rechargeable batteries, reusable razors, re -refined motor oil, etc. The 1998 campaign will retunt back to,a four week event: scheduled for 1/11/98 through 2/7/98. The four campaign messages have been "t%veaked" and are as follows: #1 Bring your own bag. GOAL: Reduce the number of bags taken from store checkout. #2 Buy products, made with recycled materials. MAT.: increase the sale of products made with recycled content. #3 Buy the largest size you can use. GOAL: Increase the sale of larger sizes and decrease the sale of small and/or individually wrapped items. #4 Buy long lasting and reusable products. GOAL: Increase the sale of long lasting and reusable products. Sr" Recycling 4.15-554-3400 RE 315/97 5:26 FM 2/3 Each inessage is scheduled to be highlighted during one of the four campaign weeks, The cormZ Wrap as well as television and radio advertising will be altered to reL;,ct the "message of the week." The revised m:ssaoes lend themselves to expand far beyond supernaar•kets. As a result, the working group is currently exploring opport.unitie to partner with retailers beyond the grocery industry. 7,xampler, of potential new retail partners include TARGET, Wal -Afars. Long Drugs. etc. The messages also allow the campaign to brine focus to a new realm of products r:+nging from rechar4eable batteries and long-lasting light bulbs to retread tires and re -refined motor oil.. In an effort to produce the most effective campaign possible, the working group hopes to utilize a focus group to review and comment or. the revised carnpaivrt messages. The «orking group is also exploring the possibility of redesigning the campaign loco and it is hopeful a focus group can review possible new logo designs as =ll. Both of these activities are depend:mt on campaign iiinding. 4. To date, the campaign has not secured funding from groups other than local government. The working group is in preliminary discu.:3ions with organizations such as the C.INVNID, California Department of Cons:;"<-atior.. USEPA_ retailers and the like. Tl:c working group is also hooking at various grant opportunities. ANY INPUT ON POSSIBLE FUl.."DRAISING OPPORTUNITIES WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATLD. 5. Below is a list detailing each Shop Stuart county :intact along with their phone number. My name and telephone number is also un the list and you are welcome to contact me al any lime. 1 Alameda Brian Matthews i AC". 1A 510-614-1699 2 Contra Costa Deidra Dingman 510-335-1230 3 Marin Michael Frost 415-499-6647 4 Napa Amy Garden 707-253-4545 5 San Francisco David Assmann 415-554-3409 6 San Mateo Cheri Puls 415-599-1412 7 Santa Clara _ _ Barbara Lani arter 408-441-1198 8 Solano Catherine McCarth • 707-421-6765 9 Sonoma Paul Magvan 707-527-3587 10 Yolo Kri5ty Solowav 916-757-5564 I Program Coordinator Lisa Jolliffc i 415-554-3415 6. The working group meeting is scheduled for Tuesday, August 26th , from 9:30 am - 11:30 am at the San Francisco Recycling Office, 1145 Market Street, Suite 404.The location is BART accessible and anyone is welcome to attend. Coniact the San Francisco Solid Waste 'Management Program at 415-554-3400 for directions. Want to start mceh,mg Shop Smart updates and correspondence -,ia a-inail? If so, please provide gout• e-mail address to.David Assmann at dasstnann(,a,sirius.cotn 08/05i1997 18:20 4155543426 SOLID WASTE MGMT PRG PAGE 01 Kaep Rp.nyr_.lirig Working: Buy RPCycledi Tu ecjuc;cile, encourage and persuade Americans t1at recycling is not a trend, but a necessary component of a sustainable environment. Persuade detractors in the press and others that recycling !s Working, Cost-effective and good for our environment. A successful America Recycles. Day will help to increase market Vali JAMA fnr rRnyr:lahIPG anri reinforrP public support for recycling. n :. :, S„„�c'.� 'z'�A`s Y ki'xi:' . �i tf.,rT� '»if.�y,>>;;<te�e'S� -rte,' 's3+ a X'4r ! ?R rR .£;j '.fsaC` �aw �kYyL e�?risY., . •�.'4� �"xFf..:..c.9ss..c',..: w Z z >. ...iy�.,uc1::�.�.yi..,, S,: xx:, Y.. ;.y .neo. ._x;•w,e�r; ;`V3 s. 0. ' - e"�'"je-�-r� ��--„'5e�+��.,`�a^`� � 's'�✓,� s .c+w 'K ,� : tz s s h i eT ,� _ �. _ , P w �� .. r {r•'+ ' �w..M� s1+ i z x t.. y rr s xs z Hore.xar�i Cf'efr Vice President All Gore i%hy Media ktark !s: National Co -Chairs: Fran Mr -Poland Federa Envlrpnmpmtsi Executive Bill Heenan, President Steel Recycling institute Cehfomie OaC hahm James R. Kuhl, PrAgiris.nt SWANA Founding Chapter Hahne Wopnlox, Viuc Prtstilc.iarll National Source Reduction 4, 1 c�^tear: Recycling Programs Bank of America Naticned _::MZwiivr.. The Envirommontai Council Ca-Irnit;tse: of the States Environmental Defense Fund Office of the Federal Environmental Executive Food Marketing Inatitute National Recycling Coalition Recycling Coalition of Texas Solid Waste Association of North America (SWANA) Steel Recycling institute Union Camp U.S. Conference of Mayors U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) U.S. Postai Service Natiu0a! nr r foundLna sponsors steel Recyciing Institute U.S. Environmental Proteotlon Agency �,*r nrr,nntal..cf+smclons Union Camp Corporation U.S. Postal Sm Aco BFI The Home Depot Nratonei supccj: Web Site: Califcunia support: Los Angeles New York Chicago Philadclphla San Francisco Boston Washington, D.C. Dallas -Fort Worth Atlanta Houston 'The American Crrccn Orcom Home” One AmerlCan family will win -n e ,ymenaan Ureen Uream HOUse' as 8 national grand prize. The winner wit be chosen from a random drawing of recyoling pledges submitted by indi iiduels who pledge to start or snriance recycling in their oorrvnunitle3• Pledge cards, posters, event planning guidee i -ann YESi C.ON htto-J/www.anioricorooycJesda3xorg California Recycles Day P.O. Box 15238 Long Beach, CA 9087 s (582) 570.2950 (tel) (582) 570-2881 (fax) r.sre..�►�r��� is not a trend, but a necessary component of a sustainable environment... Public -Private Partnership Forms To Organize IN First Annual "America Recycles Day" ire November LD N v M t to rn u� CJ CID r - m m to m ao M By Kim A. O'Connell Ir the traclition of Fmh Day, a rcali- tion of public and privnte organizations hopes to inc-ewe public awnr!ew.%s about recycling, with the first annum Ama•ica Recycles Day, planned for Nov. 15. 'he crtalition's ental is to organise a national event that will educate rnilligme of Arnericans Fbout the environmental .end ecowu►ic beaeftts of recy_ling and buying recycled -content product;. The theme of this year's America Recycles Da_r is "Keep Req, -ding W)rking" 1be America Recycles Day initiative is based on Texas Recycles Day, a successful hr= -?car -old plog-arn tient boated my- rlinz rates inIX) percent o -the Texas com- arunites that participated, In 1996, Imre :hen 300 special events ton!, illace, and 145,J(1D fcxans plcdaed to recycle m:>'re 1sce Rec)•rling Trrxrs, i)c(-.• ! 0, 1996). "Oil Atnerica Recycle Day, we'll ask al! 'Im,-ricant to make a ldedge to step up ihe! r actions to keep recv_ling," said Bill Reeraa, president of the Pittsburgh -based Steel Recycling lnstitute(SRI)andcc clmir of rl-e initiative. On Nov. 15, special recycling evcltts v, ill lake plat( acnoss tbeccatutry, Gran st,el can col cctitincontes(s and landfill tours. to buti'-i?cycled show^etas end cu!npt�slstg to+n,�n+trations. Vice Prrsident Al Gore Aso has ag ved t,r swve as ht:norary chairman of Amc.rca Recyc:lcsl ayandwill attend events. Nov. 5. Ac rording to Ke.vin 'fuerli, n. tional tluector ofAti erica P,ecycics Day and pres- ident of Austin, texas -Chased 1Uerff-Davis Envirnkledia. orgaaizaii4tns in 17 states have expres_d interest in coordinati tg sate Witfe reryain�drys in crinjonction w th the rtatianaf America Recycles D)y. Mare tb_rr. I,%'(X) local events arc exl*Md. "O -ie of the shirr;:; we' re been doting is having a nu nber of mnver;atinnz with the erg nil:ellen ;trsol agencies acrom !hc com- try to enuru-age ohm to buy into thin ini- tiative;' Tuedl'said. "We brow we are goi ng to be able to acc o:nplish something very signi f cant_" Tuerff :oined the project after four years with 'he Texas Natural Resource Conservation Connrtimion, where he helped organize Texas Recycles: Day. After a we sentatiion at Texas' program at the "Sometimes, some of the hardest work is getting all these different groups to agree on wham exactl)l our message will be. " —Tue'.,`J Alexandria, Va.-based National Recycling ,=oalition's (VRC) Annual Cont-ress and exposition ie 1'itts?urgh last September-, Tuert'f tr-cewtcl many requests for infortsa- 64- from othrr stats representatives. "lt was t7lear that providing (tat kikof assistance was beyund the scope of w:rat texas alone c -sued do," he said Over the next few months, the p:artner- ship will cont nue Io work with hesinesses, industry, governments, scbuots, ::ivic Ancl environmental groups, and other arganira- dons to organize thce kinds of events. " S-anetimes, some of the hardest work k getting all these different group, to agree nn what exactly our message will b:;"Tuerff said. 'The gcod news is, our parh!ership [has] come to. the cinclusion that we are going to go forward with th:s event and also fiat we are going to promote buying rmy_ clod as one of the primary messages." "Na(ionwide, we have a problem with low market values for many ncyclables," said Fran McPodand, the Federal Envirortmeatal Executive eald co -choir of the event. 'Americans are recycling at a record pacc,but to keep recycling working, we also must build demand for recycled -content prodtcts,' she said. "Many of us foci thatwe have been rea- sonably strc„-essfu: in edueating lite public about the value of recycling;' Me cland added. "Whut we haven': been so success- ful on is educating the public about the value of binning recycled." McPolmd said that the Nov. 15 date was carefully chosen because it puts same distance t+etween Ameri:a Recycles Day and Earth Day—held April 22—and it is after most elections and farenocgh into the school year for tea_hers to organize acti vi - ties wound the evcnL "America Recycles Day i a much "lore targered event than F.erth I)ay," fblcMand slid. "It's trying to bring logcther everyone in the recycling community and dcdiVtT a very Clem message about my- rling and the value it has for society." TD publicise the event, organizers plan Us intplernert a national media campaign using. television and radio public !zer:iee a!lnouncements; (PSAs) and an incentive program wl:errhy indiv-duals will sign cards pledriag to der MOT recycling and purtrhasing of recycled productk. Tae New You, City -based lEnvirntnnental Defense Fund (FDF.:dill produce all the PSAs related Io thr event. ` FDF has had a lorg-stanjing lztrtnerrhip with the Advertising Council and FPA to Produce recycling -related PSAs, which =ea- ture actress )_)anrte WtKAward. "ll ,just seenred like a natural w:tv to repeat and slrengthea the buy -recycled rncs_ ;age," eaid JIM Plaggcstz, EDPs di rector of rwblicatTairs "We scheduled the timing [of e'alte. ort naee 11 America Recycles. cant from p. 7 the PSAs] so they will buildup in the six to eight weeks up to the America Recycles Day celebration." The event and pledge campaign will be _--ormally kicked offat NRC's 16th Annual Ccogress and Exposition -this September. One major aspect of An -erica Recycles Day will be a national contest to win `"Cee American Greert Dream Home." lite winner will he chosen frorn a random drawing of recycling pledges sub-nitted as part of America Recycles Day. Thr -Green Drean Home will be built with recycled - content, energy-efficient, ani otherwise "earth-fiiendi_v" ptnduc(s. Partners in dee initiative inchrde NRC SRI, EDF, tae E.nvironrrental Council of Straes, the Office of the Federal Envirimrental Executive, the Fond lvlarlceting Institute, tae . Solid Waste A_v;miation of Nord America, the U.S. Cottfercrtce of Mayans. the U.S. EPA, and the U -S. Postal service. For more informs -tion, refer to the Ameiica Rmvcl-s Day World Wi:ie Web site at: tvwwameriearecycles day.org. ad SF Recycling August 5, 1997 To: Ba`- Area Cities and Counties :'rom: David Assmann Re: America Recycles Day 415-554-3400 RO 8/5/97 5:26 PM 3/3 America Rccvcics Day is national outreach campaign to raise public awareness about recycling with a sub theme of promoting the purchase of recti'cled products. The attached article and overview sponsor sheet iyill give you basic information about America Recycles Day. There will be a meeting in San Francisco on Tuesday August 26th from. 1 pm to 3 pm al 101 Orove Street for any recti cling coordinator or local government representative interested in participating in America Recycles Day on November 15th. If you are interested in attending, please call me at (415) 554-3409 or send me an email at dassmann(cvsirius.com, and I will forward additional information to you. RESOLUTION NO. 97- a3-7 BUPP®RTZNCW" NOVEMBER 20, 1997 as THE AMERICAN CANCER SOCIETY'S GiRE�iT°�i�l.�'RIC�i1�7 SiMOF�R®ZTT' WHEREAS, the North Coast Tobacco Prevention Network, of the Sonoma County Office of Education, is conducting the third "Tobacco Free Sabbath" November 15 and 16 to educate and empower youth and to improve family decisions about tobacco use; and WHEREAS, the North Coast Tobacco Prevention Network realizes the faith community is a place that community members look to for guidance. The faith community is a great place to encourage people to make healthy lifestyle choices; and WHEREAS, the American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeout encourages smokers to quit as part of the 21 st Anniversary Celebration; and WHEREAS, increasing numbers of children are experimenting with a product that can produce lifetime addiction with an increased risk of cancer; and WHEREAS, youth -related promotions such as the Great American Smoke Scream and the Great American Smokeout Pledge encourage youth not to start smoking; and WHEREAS, the health benefits of not smoking are substantiated and well known. NOW, THEREFORE, I, Linda Spiro, Mayor of the City of Rohnert Park, by virtue of the authority vested in me; recognize that November 15 and 16, 1997 were designated as the Tobacco Free Sabbath by the North Coast Tobacco Prevention Network of the Sonoma County Office of Education, and I do hereby support November 20, 1997, as the American Cancer Society's GREAT AMERICAN SMOKEOUT DAY in this city, and in doing so, urge all smokers and smokeless tobacco users to demonstrate to themselves and our children that they can quit and to further encourage our children not to start smoking by joining the American Cancer Society's 21st Annual Great American Smokeout. DULY AND REGULARLY ADOPTED this 28th day of October, 1997 CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Mayor ATTEST: Deputy City Clerk FLORES MACKENZIE REILLY VIDAK-MARTINEZ SPIRO AYES NOES ABSENT ABSTAIN �,k CITY OF ROHNERT PARK COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM TRANSMITTAL REPORT Department: City Manager's Office City Clerk Use Only Meeting Date Held Until Submitted By: Pat Baca Ze 4 0-97,oe_ Item Number Item Number Agenda Title: Boys & Girls Club Lease Agreement Date of Action Deadline Date for Council Action: IRequested Council Action: Approval of Resolution 97- Approving the Second Amendment to the Lease Agreement I with the Boys & Girls Club of Rohnert Park for Rental of Space at 435 Southwest Boulevard. Background: Agreements were entered into on October 13, 1992 with the Boys &'Girls Club of Rohnert Park to lease 1800 square feet and with the Sonoma County Office of Education (SCOE) to lease 2022 square feet in the former Public Safety offices at 435 Southwest Boulevard. The Boys & Girls Club and SCOE shared the Lobby (135 sq. ft.) and Kitchen (175 sq. On January 11, 1994, Resolution 94-18 adopted the First Amendment to the Lease Agreement, which moved 1.100 square feet of vacated space from SCOE Lease to the Boys & Girls Club Lease. The First Amendment also increased the rent from the Boys & Girls Club from $1.00 to $2.00 per year and increased the $100 monthly reimbursement, by the City, for electrical usage in City fire bay and radio room to $125 per month. Summary: SCOE has vacated the property at 435 Southwest Boulevard and has relocated its operation to El Colegio Center at 1059 Camino Coronado. The facilities are now occupied solely by the Boys & Girls Club. Attached are copies of the Second Amendment to the original Lease Agreement to reflect the 100% occupancy at 435 Southwest Boulevard by the Boys & Girls Club of Rohnert Park. Also attached is the Resolution adopting the Lease Amendment. CITY MkNAGER'S RECOMMENDATION: Consent Item ( ) Regular Item Approval L ( ) Not Recommended ( ) Public Hearing Required ( ) Submitted with Comment (.) Policy Determination by Council Comments: City Manager's Signature: Council Action (If Other than Requested) AF: c:\msoffice\winword\data\council\bec Clerk Use Vote: Date RESOLUTION NO. 97 - A RESOLUTION AMENDING SECTION 2 AND 6 OF THAT CERTAIN LEASE AGREEMENT DATED OCTOBER 13, 1992 BETWEEN THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK, AS LESSOR, AND THE BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF ROHNERT PARK, AS LESSEE, AND BEING FOR THE USE OF THE FORMER PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING AT _435 SOUTHWEST BOULEVARD FOR A BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB. BE IT RESOLVED by the Rohnert Park City Council that this Second Lease Amendment to the original lease, dated October 13, 1992, approved on that date byResolution Resolution No. 92-167, and the First Lease Amendment, dated January 11, 1994, adopted on ' that . date by Resolution No. 94-18, with the Boys and Girls Club of Rohnert Park for rental of space at 435 Southwest Boulevard is hereby approved. The Mayor is authorized to execute said .Second Lease Agreement for and on behalf of the City of Rohnert Park. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City Manager is directed to implement the terms and conditions of said Second Lease Amendment. DULY AND REGULARLY ADOPTED this day of October, 1997. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Mayor ATTEST: -Deputy City Clerk FIRST AMENDMENT TO THE LEASE AGREEMENT WITH THE BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF ROHNERT PARK FOR RENTAL OF SPACE AT 435 SOUTHWEST BOULEVARD THIS SECOND LEASE AMENDMENT, made this day of October, 1997 to the Lease Agreement executed on October 13, 1992 for rental of space at 435 Southwest Boulevard, is by and between the City of Rohnert Park, a Municipal Corporation (hereinafter referred to as. "City'), and the Boys and Girls Club of Rohnert Park (hereinafter referred to as "Tenant'). WITNESSETH: NOW, THEREFORE, City and Tenant, for and in consideration of the mutual promises and agreements herein contained do agree as follows: 1. Section 2 of the Lease entitled "LEASED PREMISES" shall be deleted in its entirely and replaced as follows: That City does hereby lease to Tenant, and Tenant does hereby lease from City, those certain premises situated in the City of Rohnert Park, County of Sonoma, State of California, more particularly described as follows: a space containing approximately 4132 square feet, which includes lobby area and kitchen facilities, plus the shed at the rear of the parking lot, plus parking, located at 435 Southwest Boulevard. 2. Section 6 of the Lease entitled .`.RENTAL" shall be deleted in its entirety and replaced as follows: Tenant agrees to pay City, in advance, on the first day of each calendar year at the office of the City or such other place designated by City, without any prior demand therefore, and without any deduction of set-off whatsoever, as annual rental, the sum of $ L— dollars) per year. Additional consideration is given to the City by providing youth programs for the community. Tenant agrees to pay all utilities and services, including without limitation, gas, electricity, water, sewer, and garbage. The City is not responsible for any utility costs, except for a monthly reimbursement payment of $125 (one hundred and twenty five dollars) per month payable to Tenant for electrical usage in the fire bay and radio room currently utilized by the City for storage of vehicles and equipment on the premises. Tenant will pay directly its own janitorial and telephone costs. The City agrees to allow the Tenant at its expense to demolish, construct, or modify the premises with prior approval from the City. The cost of reasonable leasehold improvements shall be paid by the Tenant. The City has agreed to allow two portable classrooms to be installed by Tenant on the premises, subject to approval and any conditions imposed by the Planning Commission and/or City Council. Tenant may fence a portion of back paved yard area and install sports courts and basketball backstops with lighting as necessary subject to approval by City Manager and City Department of Public Safety. 3. All of the other terms and conditions of the Lease dated October 13, 1992 and First Amendment dated January 11, 1994, between City and Tenant shall remain in full force and effect. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the City and the Tenant have hereunto and to a duplicate hereof, set their respective hands and seals, the day and year first above written. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK By: Mayor BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF ROHNERT PARK President r't A.2K E D co l� y 7=0`2 Jit/ RESOLUTION NO. 94 - 18 A RESOLUTION AMENDING SECTIONS 2, 3, AND 6 OF THAT CERTAIN LEASE AGREEMENT DATED OCTOBER 13, 1992 BETWEEN THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK, AS LESSOR, AND THE BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF ROHNERT PARK, AS LESSEE, AND BEING FOR THE USE OF THE FORMER PUBLIC SAFETY BUILDING AT 435 SOUTHWEST BOULEVARD FOR A BOYS AND GIRD CLUB BE IT RESOLVED by the Rohnert Park City Council that this First Lease Amendment to the original lease dated October 13, 1992, approved on that date by Resolution No. 92-167, with the Boys and Girls Club of Rohnert Park for rental of space at 435 Southwest Boulevard is hereby approved. The Mayor is authorized to execute said First Lease Amendment for and on behalf of the City of Rohnert Park. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City Manager is directed to implement the terms and conditions of said First Lease Amendment. DULY AND REGULARLY ADOPTED this 11th day of January, 1994. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK ECK AYE GALLAGHER AYE HOLLINGSWORTH AYE SPIRO AYE REILLY AYE -AYES:- 5 NOES: 0 ABSENT: 0 ABSTAIN: _0 FIRST AMEl`.�MENT TO THE LEASE AGREE DENT WITH THE BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF ROHNERT PARK FOR RENTAL OF SPACE AT 435 SOUTHWEST BOULEVARD THIS FIRST LEASE AMENDMENT, made this 11th day of January, 1994 to the Lease Agreement executed on October 13, 1992 for rental of space at 435 Southwest Boulevard, is by and between City of Rohnert Park, a Municipal Corporation (hereinafter referred to as "City"), and the Boys and Girls Club of Rohnert Park (hereinafter referred to as "Tenant"). WITNESSETH: NOW, THEREFORE, City and Tenant, for and in consideration of the .mutual promises and agreements herein contained do agree as follows: L Section 2 of the Lease entitled "LEASED PREMISES" shall be deleted in its entirety and replaced as follows: That City does hereby lease to Tenant, and Tenant does hereby lease from City, those certain premises situated in the City of Rohnert Park, County of Sonoma, State of California, more particularly described as follows: 4-1 SZ- =C14 1 NC(.u.Des �0 3F3y a space containing approximately 1,869- square feet, plus A A 1� K,I T H-zE' -Aj VA1 � r T7 eS plus the shed cooperateat the rear of the parking lot, plus a-cr.ass_ to- kitc-hen, rest rooms w4d parking, located at 435 Southwest Boulevard. Co-T_-na ,of ldtehen, rest rooms and par -king mdth Ten- Ant nt urill Tenant ,-with the Cemmunity Seho-e-1 en the s -h -a -rad use of these facilities Tenant .....School and jointly share other parking as needed, - 2. Section 6. of the Lease entitled 'RENTAL" shall be deleted in its entirety and replaced as follows: Tenant agrees to pay City, in advance, on the first day of each calendar year at the office of City or such other place designated by City, without any prior demand therefore, and without any deduction of set-off whatsoever, as annual rental, the sum of $2.00 two dollars) per year. Additional consideration is given to the City by providing youth programs for the community. FIRST AMENDMENT TO._.L;ASE BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF ROHNERT PARK Page 2 Tenant agrees to pay its all utilities and services, including without limitation, gas, electricity, water, sewer and garbage. Anant ig .11 for reaching a ma, 11y acceptable agreement with rurrPnt Co-TPnant, Snnoma. nffire of Edue• •• •• •_ u•-• • • eir proportionate of > > all utility bills —are to- be put Ln Tenant or Co -Ten -ant na-- .,,�,,,tual4y agreed to between the..,. The City is not responsible for any utility costs -ot - billings for +remises, except for a monthly reimbursement payment of $125 (one hundred and twenty five dollars) per month payable to Tenant for electrical usage in the fire bay and radio room currently utilized by the City for storage of vehicles and equipment on the premises. Tenant--- Ce—Tenant are mutuallyresponsible for re- negotiating. bet enegoti bet een-themsel_vez thPirpro= ortionatp charas of utilities if and when they deem ;-R-e-eessar-y to adult f®w �•c rate ^hT ^ ;Tenant will pay directly its own janitorial and telephone costsl The City agrees to allow the Tenant at its expense to demolish, construct, or modify the premises with prior approval from the City. The cost of reasonable leasehold improvements shall be paid for by the Tenant. The City, agrees'to allow two portable classrooms to be installed by Tenant on the premises, subject to approval and any conditions imposed by the Planning Commission and/or City Council. Tenant may fence a portion of back paved yard area and install sports courts and basketball backstops with lighting as necessary subject to approval of City Manager and City Department of Public Safety. To to hove the right to lease any and "alL space Tl}e-l�}t3�-agrees�e�le�v theme-��t oo-a�. � �-firsta sa � = so � y- �-�� that may fpArn the neighboring eenunurAty sehool. or the existing city e negotiated and agreed to by both psartins 3. Section 3. of the I.,ease entitled "USES" shall be deleted in its entirety and - - replaced as follows: The -premises are to be used by Tenant for administrative office business during the FIRST AMENDMENT TO SE Page 3 BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF ROHNERT PARK hours of 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday, and for conducting a boys and girls club during the hours of 1 p.m. to 9 p.m., Monday through Friday, and 10 a.m. to 9:00 p.m., Saturdays and Sundays. 4. Section U. of the Lease entitled "HOLD HARMLESS" shall be amended by adding a third paragraph to state as follows: The City agrees to indemnify and hold Tenant harmless against any damages, loss or liability, including attorney's fees, . arising from the presence of any hazardous or toxic substances or contamination on leased premises not. caused by Tenant, or by Tenant's officers, agents, employees or program participants. 5. All of the other terms and conditions of the Lease dated August 25,1992, between City and Tenant shall remain in full force and effect. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the City and the Tenant have hereunto and to a duplicate hereof, set their respective hands and seals, the day and year first above written. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB OF ROHNERT PARK i • ./ •/ sident RESOLUTION NO. 97- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK AUTHORIZING AND APPROVING AGREEMENT WITH THE COUNTY OF SONOMA FOR THE CONDUCT OF MUNICIPAL ELECTIONS BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of Rohnert Park that that certain agreement between the City of Rohnert Park and the County of Sonoma providing for the conduct by the County of Sonoma of municipal elections within the City of Rohnert Park be, and the same is hereby approved. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the Mayor is hereby authorized and directed to execute the abovementioned agreement for and on behalf of the City. DULY AND REGULARLY ADOPTED this 28th day of October, 1997. -CTTY OF ROHNERT PARK Mayor ATTEST: Deputy City Clerk FLORES MACKENZIE REILLY VIDAK-MARTINEZ SPIRO AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: city cotmciihmmkoLdoc EEVE T. LEWIS COUNTY CLERK October 8, 1997 City of Rohnert Park Joseph Netter, City Manager P. O. Box 1489 Rohnert Park CA 94928-1489 Dear Mr. Netter: 2300 County Center,Dr.,~Ste: B-177 Santa Rosa, California 95403` Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman Copy to /,I _.U- pp Q e -- Copy to 52 Copy to 4-0 10 799. As you are aware, the County of Sonoma, Department of the Registrar of Voters, conducts city elections under the terms of contract between our two jurisdictions. The existing contract is -.due to expire on December 31, 1997. I have enclosed a new contract for your review and adoption. As with the previous one, the term of the contract is for f veyear& as allowed by Government Code, and its provisions are consistent with the prior contract with a few minor changes. We have made some stylistic changes and have also corrected Election Code references to reflect the recodification/renumbering of the Election Code that took place during the past five years. In addition, in the event the City chooses to terminate the contract pursuant to the last paragraph, the notice period has been extended from 60 to 90 days to accommodate the time frames involved in preparing for (and incurring expenses for) an election. PHONE -3800 Please review the contract and let me know if there are any concerns or issues that need modification. I had it reviewed by our County Counsel to be certain it reflects any necessary changes that have arisen over the term of the contract, and they were minor at best. Once it has met with your approval, please have it approved and executed by the City Council and forward it to my office. As soon as I have the contracts fi-orn the rest of the Cities in Sonoma County, I will take them all to the Board of Supervisors for their approval as well. I will forward executed copies to you for your records when the process is completed. Thank you for your assistance, and I look forward to another -five years of mutually cooperative working relationships. Verytruly yours, Eeve T. Lewis Sonoma County Clerk _ and Registrar of Voters ETL-.bem Enclosures CONTRACT THIS AGREEMENT is made and entered into this date, by and between the COUNTY OF SONOMA, a political subdivision of the State of California, hereinafter referred to as the "County", and the CITY OF ROHNERT PARK a municipal corporation, hereinafter referred to as the "City"; The parties mutually contract and agree as follows: This contract is made and entered into pursuant to Government Code Section 51300 et seq. and is subject to all the provisions thereof, 2. At City's request, the County shall render the following services to the City: A. Conduct, manage, and supervise all municipal elections held within the City during this period; b. Procure and furnish all supplies and equipment to be used in said elections, c. Perform all related services and functions necessary to the accomplishment of this agreement; 3. This contract shall continue in force and et1"ect until notice of termination is given or, pursuant to Government Code Section 51302, at the expiration of five (5) years from the end of this calendar year. 4. For the purposes of conducting said elections, the Sonoma County Clerk shall exercise such powers and duties conferred by law upon the Clerk of the City with respect to elections, as agreed to by both parties. Such duties shall include, but not be limited to, those powers and duties set forth in Division 10, Part 2 of the California Elections Code, commencing with Section 10100, excluding the issuance and tiling of nomination documents, and those set forth in Division i3, commencing with Section 13000. 5. Upon the completion of the offlicial canvass of the votes cast, and upon proper demand by the County, the City shall forthwith reimburse the County for any and all expenses incurred by the County in connection with said election as follows: a. EQUIPMENT AND SUPPLIES: The County shall procure all equipment and supplies in the name of and on behalf of the City. ii. The amount, source and nature of said equipment and supplies will be determined in accordance with applicable laws. The County will have complete discretion in making determinations in procurement of equipment and supplies in Expenses incurred by the County in the accomplishment of this section of the agreement _.shall, at the option of the County, either be paid directly by the City upon confirmation by the County, or shall be paid to the County upon demand. b. POSTAGE: Postage shall, upon request of the County, either be prepaid by the City by warrant in the requested amount payable to "Postmaster at Santa Rosa", or be paid to the County upon proper demand.. c. POLLING PLACES AND"ELECTION OFFICIALS: The City shall, upon proper demand, pay all polling place expenses and compensation of election officials attributable to the conduct of such election, including the cost of insurance if necessary. d. COUNTY STAFF SERVICES AND SUPPLIES: The City shall pay all expenses incurred by the County for staff services and use of County supplies. "Expenses" as used in this section shall include the cost or the reasonable value of the following: i. Time and effort expended by County officers and employees, ii. Equipment and supplies furnished by the County, iii. Any other necessary expenditures made by the County in the accomplishment of this agreement. The City shall provide suitable locations for consolidation of returns and any other necessary functions if requested by the County. 7. County employees assigned to duties in the performance of this agreement shall remain .at all times Linder supervision or control of the County. The City shall exercise no supervision or control of such employees. If questions arise on the part of the City as to performance, such questions will be referred directly to the County Clerk as the supervisor of such employees and the determination or resolution of questions or problems shall be settled as mutually agreed upon by the parties of this contract. For purposes of workers compensation insurance, it is intended that ail persons performing services under this agreement shali remain in the general service of the County, and that their services on behalf of the City shall be considered a special employment which shall not subject the City to liability under workers compensation laws. - However, it is understood that the County in computing the cost of its services hereunder may take into.account its direct cost of providing workers compensation insurance coverage for such employees in proportion to time spent in the performance of this contract. COUNTY shall hold harmless, defend and indemnify CITY fi-om and against any liability, claims, actions, costs, damages or losses, to any person, damage to any property arising out of COUNTY'S activities . under this agreement. CITY shall hold harmless, defend and indemnify COUNTY from and against any liability, claims, actions, costs, damages or losses, to any person, damage to any property arising out of CITY'S activities under this agreement. The County in computing its -- costs of services Linder this agreement may take into account the direct cost of providing adequate liability insurance to cover operations Linder this agreement. The parties understand that each party maintains insurance programs under workers compensation laws and in 2 protection of various other liability risks and exposures; each party shall continue to maintain such programs as a matter of its own discretion. In the event liability is imposed upon the parties to this agreement under any circumstances in which the above provisions of this paragraph do not control, and if the liability is joint and several, the parties shall contribute equally to the settlement of any claim orju.dgment. 8. Nothing contained in this contract shall relieve the City of the ultimate responsibility for canvassing the returns of any election held hereunder, nor shall the County be obligated in any case to defend or prosecute any action at law or equity arising out of any such election or contesting the validity of any such election. The City shall be responsible for defending any court action brought to challenge any election held pursuant to this contract. 9. It is expressly recognized that this agreement transfers ministerial duties only. In the event that policy questions arise, such questions will be referred to the City for decision by the appropriate city officials. 10. For any fiscal year commencing after December 3 I, 1997 the City at the time of its annual budget deliberations, may terminate this contract by giving the County 90 day written notice of termination. In such event, the County will not be responsible for the conduct of elections occurring thereafter. If no such notice is given, this contract will be deemed to have been renewed for an additional term of one year. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the parties hereto have affixed their hands and seals. COUNTY OF SONOMA BY, JAMES HARBERSON, CHAIRMAN SONOMA COUNTY BOARD OF SUPERVISORS DATE ATTEST: COUNTY CLERK & REGISTRAR OF VOTERS 3 ATTEST.- CITY TTEST:CITY CLERK BY DATE SEAL CITY OF ROHNERT PARK BY MAYOR - DATE m rk RESOLUTION NO. 97- J I A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK REJECTING THE CLAIM OF AYLING WU (C/O LAW OFFICES OF JOHN L. BURRIS AND VICTOR HWANG OF ASIAN LAW CAUCUS) RE. ALLEGED WRONGFUL DEATH OF HUSBAND KWANCHUNG KAO BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of Rohnert Park that that certain claim dated September 30, 1997 and received October 1, 1997 from the Law. Offices of John L. Burris and Victor Hwang of the Asian Law Caucus on behalf of Ayling Wu is hereby rejected. DULY AND REGULARLY ADOPTED this 28th day of October, 1997. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Mayor ATTEST: Deputy City Clerk FLORES MACKENZIE REILLY VIDAK-MARTINEZ SPIRIO AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: CITY OF ROHNERT PARI{ 6750 Commerce Blvd. Rohnert Park, Ca. 94928 Telephone: (707) 795-2411 FAX: (707) 664-8474 October 2, 1997 Jeffrey J . Davis, General Manager Redwood Empire Municipal Insurance Fund P. O. Box #885 Sonoma, CA 95476 Ayling Wu (c/:o Law Offices of John L. Burris RE: Claim of and Victor Hwang of Asian Law Caucus) Re. Alleged Wrongful ea of Husband Dear Jeff: Kwanchung Kao Enclosed please find copies of all pertinent information relating to the above referenced claim. I trust that your office will follow up on this matter. This, claim has been schedu ed for rejection by the City Council on 1q- f D� / Please give me a call if an additional information is desired. Unless we hear from you to ' � Y th contrary, I will assume the matter is being appropriately handled to protect the -City's best interests. Very truly yours, CITY OF ROHNERT PARK J ep D. Netter -City Manager JDN:lr Enc. Cc: City Councilmembers John D. Flitner, City Attorney - - Mike Harrow, Finance Director : Claim File No. 9742 Patrick E. Rooney, Director of Public Safety September 30, 1997 CLAIM UNDER GOVERNMENT CODE SECTIONS 905 -and 910 199? J AYLING:.WU, individually and as a successor in interest to KWANCHUNG KAO, and acting as Guardian Ad Litem of KYLE S. KAO, KAROLYN Y. KAO, and KALLEN W. KAO, presents claims for damages against the City of Rohnert Park, the Rohnert Park Public Safety Department, Rohnert Park Public Safety Director Pat Rooney, Officer Jack Shields, officer Michael Lynch, Sonoma County, Sonoma County Sheriff's Department, and other agents and employees whose identities have not been ascertained. CLAIMANTS' ADDRESS: John L. Burris Law Offices of John L. Burris 1212 Broadway, Suite 1200 Oakland, CA 94612 (510) 839-5200 (510) 839-3882 (fax) Victor Hwang Asian Law Caucus 720 Market St.,.Suite 500 San Francisco, CA 94102 (415) 391-1655 (415) 391-0366 (fax) DATE OF OCCURRENCE: April 29, 1997 PLACE OF OCCURRENCE: In the vicinity of 1512 Maria Place, Rohnert Park, California THIS CLAIM ARISES FROM THE FOLLOWING CIRCUMSTANCES On April 29, 1997, Mr. KWANCHUNG KAO was drinking in a bar in Cotati, California, where racial slurs were directed at him. Mr. Kao arrived at his home at 1512 Maria Place in Rohnert -Park, 'California, at approximately 2:00 a.m. Mr. Kao was extremely CLAIM UNDER GOVERNMENT CODE SECTION 905. AND 910 Re: Kwanchung Kao Page 2 distraught because of the racist incident -he had been involved in, and was also very intoxicated. Upon arriving home, Mr. Kao took off his shirt and began dancing around in the street yelling, "help me my neighbors.". Multiple neighbors called the police. During this time, Ms. Wu, Mr. Kao's wife exited their residence at 1512 Maria Place and attempted to coax her husband inside the house. he was obviously intoxicated and acting foolish. He also had a 3/4" dowel rod which he was twirling around like a drum major. At no time did Mr. Kao threaten anyone, approach anyone or endanger the lives of any person. At 2:16 a.m. Officer Jack Shields and Officer Michael Lynch responding to calls of a person acting crazy, arrived on the scene. They approached Mr. Kao very quickly in their vehicles with their overhead lights and sirens off. Officer Lynch attempted to strike Mr. Kao with his car in an attempt to scare Mr. Kao. Mr. Kao, intoxicated, blinded by the police car's headlights and spotlights, disoriented and frightened, attempted to ward off Officer Lynch's vehicle by poking the vehicle with his stick. Officer Lynch, the officer in charge, decided to retreat and wait for back up: He ordered Officer Shields to stay in his car._ Ignoring Officer Lynch's order, Officer Shields exited his vehicle, and confronted Mr. Kao. Mr. Kao continued to hold on to his stick, but did not advance on Officer Shields. Officers Shields and Lynch did not announce they were police officers. Mr. Kao's wife attempted to approach Mr. Kao and take the stick from her husband, but was ordered away by Officer Shields. Officer Shields then shot and killed Mr. Kao without justification. Officer Shields was carrying pepper spray and a baton, but -did not attempt to use either. Mr. Kao was shot and killed within one minute of the officers arriving on the scene. The victim's wife, Ayling Wu, is a registered nurse and witnessed the entire incident. Immediately following the incident; Ms. Wu attempted to administer CPR to her -husband, but was denied this opportunity on threat of arrest. The victim's children were at home and witnessed the aftermath from upstairs windows, Following the shooting, the Rohnert Park Public Safety _Department began investigating the incident in violation of `the .Critical Incident Protocol. More than 15 Rohnert Park Public Safety officers entered the crime scene following the shooting. CLAIM UNDER GOVERNMENT CODE SECTION 905 AND 910 Re: Kwanchung Kao Page 3 The first officer from the Sonoma County Sheriff's Department did not arrive until two hours after the incident. The Critical Incident Protocol mandates that the Sonoma County Sheriff's Department conduct the investigation of any Rohnert Park Police Department shooting. The Sheriff's Department never investigated a possible homicide by Officer Shields, but framed its investigation in such a way to absolve the officers of liability. Based on that information and belief, it is alleged in the course of the investigation a number of key pieces of evidence were spoiled by the Rohnert Park Police Department and/or the Sonoma County Sheriff's Department. The City of Rohnert Park was aware of a substantial history of misconduct committed by Officer Shields, including criminal convictions for falsification of documents and yet the department continued to employ the officer to protect its citizens. The City of Rohnert Park and the Rohnert Park Public Safety Director have a mandatory duty of care to properly and adequately select, train, retain, supervise, and discipline officers to as to avoid unreasonable risk of harm to citizens. With negligence and deliberate indifference, responding parties failed to take necessary, appropriate or adequate measures to prevent the violation of Mr. Kao's and claimants' rights. They breached their duty of care to the citizens in that they failed to adequately train the officers and/or failed to have adequate policies and procedures regarding the use of deadly force. They also failed to select and retain police officers who were fit to conduct the duties assigned them. Responsible parties have a mandatory duty, which they breached, to select equipment for use by their officers which does not pose an unreasonable risk :of harm to the citizens. The lack of adequate supervisorial training demonstrates the existence of an -informal custom or policy that tolerates and promotes the continuing use of deadly and excessive force by the Rohnert Park -Public Safety.Department in unwarranted situations. NATURE AND EXTENT OF DAMAGES AND INJURIES -- Claimants have been severely injured by the wrongful death of Mr. Kao. The damages include special damages such as funeral expenses, medical expenses and loss of financial support and general damages including loss of care, comfort and society, loss of consortium and pain and suffering. Claimants also seek recovery CLAIM UNDER GOVERNMENT CODE SECTION 905 AND 910 Re: Kwanchung Kao Page 4 for the extreme emotional distress suffered by them as a. -result -of witnessing this event. Due to the -improper investigation and spoliation of evidence, claimants have also suffered loss of evidence vital to proof of their claims. Claimants will also seek recovery of attorney's fees and costs and will seek punitive damages. The amount of damages will equal or exceed $50 million. CAUSES OF ACTION The causes of action may include, but are not limited to, the following: Municipal Liability (42 U.S.C. 1983) Violation of Civil Rights --Federal (42 U.S.C. sections 1983 et seq., 1985.2_ et seq. and 1985.3 et seq.); Violation of Civil Rights --State (Calif. Civ. Code sections 51.7 et seq. and 52.1 et seq.); Wrongful Death. (Calif. Code Civ. Proc. section 377.60 et seq.); Survivor Action (Calif. Code Civ. Proc. section 377_.30 et seq.), and other -.state causes of action such as negligence,. negligent infliction of emotional distress, intentional infliction of emotional distress, negligent training, hiring, supervision, investigation and discipline, respondent superior, negligent spoliation of evidence, intentional spoliation of evidence, conspiracy, torts in -essence, willful failure to provide needed medical care while in custody and for declaratory and injunctive relief. Dated• LAW OFFICES OF JOHN L..BURRIS RESOLUTION NO. 97- t � 3 A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARD REJECTING THE CLAIM OF MILFORD L PATSEL (Re. Damage to Front Sidewalk and Front Lawn Allegedly Caused by Excessive Tree Roots) BE IT RESOLVED by the City Council of the City of Rohnert Park that that certain claim dated October 14, 1997 and received October 16, 1997 from Milford I. Patsel is hereby rejected. DULY AND REGULARLY ADOPTED this 28th day of October, 1997. CITY OF ROHNERT PARI{ Mayor ATTEST: Deputy City Clerk FLORES MACKENZIE REILLY VIDAK-MARTINEZ SPIRO AYES: NOES: " ABSENT: ABSTAIN: CITY OF ROHNERT PARI 6750 Commerce Blvd. Rohnert Park, Ca. 94928 Telephone: - (707) 795-2411 FAX: ( 707) 664-8474 October 17, 1997 Jeffrey J . Davis, General Manager Redwood Empire Municipal Insurance Fund P. O. Box #885 Sonoma, CA 95476 RE: Claim of Milford I. Patsel (Re. damage to front si ewalK & trontawn trom tree roots Dear Jeff: Enclosed please find copies of all pertinent information relating to the above referenced claim. I trust that your office will follow up on this matter. This claim has been scheduled for rejection by the City Council on October 28, 1997 Please give me a call if any additional information is desired. Unless we hear from -you to th contrary, I will assume the matter is being appropriately handled to protect the City's best interests. Very truly yours, CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Joseph D. Netter City Manager JDN:lr Enc. Cc: City Councilmembers John D. Flitner, City Attorney Mike Harrow, Finance Director Claim File'No. 97-13 Bill Stephens 7Tu lic Works Manager. Octoben l4, 1997 goaeph D. Netten Cit lanae-a/C.Lenk 67Commence Blvd 2ohnent % ank, Ca 94928-2486 Re: Claim f aed with the City o;L Rohne.nt % arft dean An. Netten, Ple.aae note: %he claim 1 juat aubmitted aAked the date, place and cincum- atancea ori the occunnen.ce that save nLae to thia claim. Secauae thio plzo6lem LA cauaed by nvvtav� tneea i.t has been. ongoingg on rieana. d ten aeveaa.L convenaatiorra with flumen Rail, �onmen head of Uept of Public Wonha., I aubmitted my �inat wni_tten communication in October o� 1996. 1 have been in contact with An Ron Santano and the City i1z6vnL4t L vu. lhe wonh has .ivat been necenily completed by yvun depantment and the neplacement o7 the .Lawn ice. ongoLng. %he only pant o� my claim that I believe L4 not within time nequined by law �A the neplacement o� the dniveway in 1990, which I wLU omit at tAL& time and conaiden rIpplication �oa Leave to %neaent a Late Claim lhanhiny you in advance �on neview and any conaideAation on this. "Laim,.. ..Si ncenely, Mal and I % atael 4/ Surroni.t d n Ccate Aadend, Ca 94925 Octo6en l0, l996 Cityo� 2ohent Paak dept. o� P uULc Wvnhi At: &(A `?aa GJM . -5rirlrW 5 56Y777�' Ai.l&nd I Patael 4/ Summit vn Conte na-dena, Ca 94925 1 �..1 am the vwnen o� the duplexes loca'-d at 742/ thnu 7427 Qictdaet lin. in Rohnent Park. 1 am no-Lyum4 ', you once aga. n about the condttLona that exit in �nvnt v� mcg property. /he nvvta. �rtom the CLty'a tnee have couied the aLde.wa.lk to name cneatin,a a ha5aad that could neault i..n a law aunt. The nooti have deatnoyed the .lawn as wLU as gAowutq anound the waters meter in luck a u -ay that makes Lt �po&4LUe tv turn oll the mainwatears upply, which cou. al be a aea.l problemLa e cage o� an emengenccy. I have taken the /Le�ponaL6aLt and coat to nepaLa the daLveJwacy which waa named and badly cracked, and am reque4tin� that the Citi c(v avmething about the aidewalk and other cvndtttvna. I am enclvaing pLcture4 PA Yvun nevtew and would .neatly appreciate,a reply to this aequeat. lhanhin,, you in advance �on cyvun conideRati.vn. 1� Sincene.y, 1!d I4i. pA,d 1. PafAd (415J 924-6125 110 U I , f �C7 CLAIM FOR MONEY OR DAMAGES AGAINST: .:,Q-, TX.;OF•-ROHNERT PARK 1199, 64 - :-ifs 16 1997 '�•1::' This claim must be presented, as prescribed by Parts 3 and 4 of Division 3.6, of Title 1 of the Government Code of the State of California, by the claimant or by a person acting on his/her behalf and shall show: The name and post office address of the claimant: TELEPHONE NO.(4r) The post office address to which the person presenting the claim desires notices to be sent: The date, place and circumstances of the occurrence or transaction which gave rise to the claim asserted: Leftez went to Cifr% ol wAnent anf, PU6.[Lc 11vnAl bri Octvhea 04 1996---,---' .4tatCn q, tAat tAene were exceaAtve. amount. of noo 'nom Cabe /h trtee cauaLn _ ,Ii iewaJ_. to nai4e, cnackLa�?. dri.vewac� and deatizovinri tAe �nont .Lawn �n aopeats .Lvca-f�pd at 742/, 22, 2, & 2,7 3nLcfoe_t Gn. "NAME, ADDRESS &-TELEPHONE NO. OF HOMEOWNERS INSURANCE CO.: (CONTACT AGENT) NAME, ADDRESS & TELEPHONE NO. OF AUTOMOBILE INSURANCE CO.: (CONTACT AGENT) A general description of the indebteaness. obligation. injury, damage or loss Acurrea so far as it may de known a r- the time of presentation of the claim: moot F',:t/iactLonj�S0, 00 damn rep'aceme_,zi oto o'e cone) -00, 00 Total 1_4/�10 vv The name(s) of the public employee(s) causing the injury, damage, or loss, if known. The amount claimed, as of the date of presentation of the claim, including the estimated amount of any prospective injury, damage or loss, insofar as it may be known at the time of the presentation of the claim, together with the basis of computation of the amount claimed: The claim shall be signed by the claimant or by some person on his/her behalf. A claim relating to a cause of action for death or for injury to the person or to personal property or growing crops shall be presented not later than six (6) calendar months or 182 days after the accrual of the cause of action whichever is longer. Claims relating to any other causes of action not later than one (1) year after accrual of the cause of action. to -)q__ 9-) DATE CLAIMANT OR REPRESENTATIVE NOTE: This form of claim is for your convenience only, and any other type of form may be used if desired, so long as it satisfies the requirements of the Government Code. The use of this form is not intended in any way to advise you of your legal rights or to interpret any law. If you are in doubt regarding your legal rights or the Interpretation of any law, we -suggest -that you seek legal counseling of your choice. 2/1/95 Iq(rl�11•. i Yi i�� ■ ��• ; f14 977 9PLACE DATEND ME OUT r 7 days a week o 7:00 AIV( to 5:30 PM AT NU r DATE AND TIME IN Viai Ave. 5100 Commerce Blvd. oI�;CA 95472 2 LOCATIONS Rohnert Park, Crt 94928 DUE DATE 823.7686 707-584-9217 PP RU LICENSE an� CITY STATE ZIP HOME PHONE 4: W t C STATE ZIP WORK PHONE I ` fpl n - • .11 t. I O -- BIRTHDATE AUTO MAKE & LIC. Q _ ,;� MIN EA. EXT. ACCIDENTAL DAMAGE ' "'•4!11499 •{! t ITEM RENTED - CHARGE HOUR DAY WEEK 4 WEEKS WAIVER CHARGES �OTAt, ;' T PER DAY„•.n Ii; Q . 4;d4. 1 - Y 7 �. i rIk ..l • .b t COST PER MINIMUM CHARGE �(� '.ClL�6al.liO t�M.. IN oufr``4sr. n r 1 • r MERCHANDISE SOLD . COST EACH QTY. RETURN OTY. USED TOTAL �� fit. �. U M : -4 1tl'@iii kil til. M; = 24 HRS. I DAY v 0 HOURS 1/6 DAILY RATE PER HOUR TOTAL RENT r METERED ' OVERTIME__' ,[ 19Wmi k! ! l DAYS I WEEK a 40 HOURS 115 WEEKLY RATE PER DAY TOTAL METERED a i' Thr I; EQUIPMENT. RATES: 4 WEEKS 1 WEEKS a 160 HOURS 1120 4 WEEK RATE PER DAY FORE SIGNING TOTAL MERCHANDISEd��" CHARGE WILL BE MADE ONALL ITEMS RETURNED WE SEMI TIME > ” WE CHARGE FOR TAX _ y , ALL TIME OUT l (GIVEN AND UNDERSTAND 'WRITTEN AND/OR INCLUDING GAS ,V!NG AND SAFETY INSTRUCTIONS: SATURDAY.SUNDAY, FUEL �' ti . ,. FLi�Arf ONLY QUALIFIED PERSONS TO OPERATE THE AND HOLIDAYS DIESEL ®r!, ` ACCID..DAMAGE WAIVER • C., j1,Df1MAGE WAIVER CHARGES ARE,AUTOYATIC, AS SPECIFIED ABOVE, UNLESS � C PELOW..ACCIDENTAL. DAMAGE WAIVER I$ NOT INSURANCE COVERAGE IS � �" i PIU AND DELIVERY CHARGES i REVERSE HEREOF SECTION # 17.-TIRE DAMAGE NOT COVERED. ' TOTAL CHARGES - �t •`•' Q IPMENT IS FULL OF FUEL -- I PAY FOR ALL FUEL USED. - ' •� �`�"".4 �I } ACCIDENTAL r , ...,.:c . r-• ... DAMAGE WAIVER-:..;.. - 0 EDGE AECEIPT EQUIPMENT SU0.IECT TO THE STATED DEPOSIT �',:4�!'' NL AND BAC T $.AGREEMENT;YItj H'.I HAVE READ. 'r.::.: �n1�-Aig;itS BALANCE DUE V YrNjilP s REPRESEHTSF IS OA OSIG .NfORREWEA ACCEPT DECLINE 14 lam ;. �;, INITIALSCHECKED BY DUT w.iII.�.Pi7LU B REDIFORM, TERMS - 14ET CASH 4L 454 ;J:>: C J 11LLLU UVl F: J ' �I IfFh 10 bF c;cR�,�ICEU� i q'. �ro`OOT ExGr As)&C <CA 2 w ►� _ ___ __ _ ...'. l F-0 e FA)T _ ...... i "CJI ij 1.• - t 1} ill. 1}I! 31 ;jt. J� t: i I �s w.iII.�.Pi7LU B REDIFORM, TERMS - 14ET CASH 4L 454 ;J:>: C J 11LLLU UVl F: J ' �I IfFh 10 bF c;cR�,�ICEU� i q'. �ro`OOT ExGr As)&C <CA 2 w ►� _ ___ __ _ ...'. l F-0 e FA)T _ :UAN. I DLsCHIPTIOI: OF PAnI5 u!=.lA([k,.,L I AMOUNT - i ;EBUR PU46; MED: 7-/0A5 SO- Total f.TureI '. 1 6- Sd _ oQ,oQ°6�� --- Tax I Bobo, O! JClotul s4 Ainount DACE WAN (ED L il'ii','dl ESTIMATES ARE FO,' LAI,;. 1,c.;.;.'i L',.,4JtL,. : , •i1A, ..i .... I:. DAMAGLCAUSLDL`,lIli:( ! 1I.F !,:.1.•:..CI:.=. ir: Ii,la1=:;• .`;' ;,.,..,.. REPAIR ORDER I i:,. l,i:;1 .:i: IJLi- iv,t tOSS. OR ..•Ji:. c !91trVL OWGINAL w.iII.�.Pi7LU B REDIFORM, TERMS - 14ET CASH 4L 454 ;J:>: C J 11LLLU UVl F: J ' �I E`Ity of: Roliaert Psrk October 10, 1997 .............. . Cit Council Milford I. Patsel 41 Summit Drive Linda Spiro Corte Madera, CA 94925 Mayor Vicki Vidak-Martinez RE: Response to Your Claim Filed with the City of Rohnert Park Vice Mayor Armando F. Flores Dear Mr. P a t s e 1 Council Member Jake Mackenzie The claim which you presented to the City of Rohnert Park on Council Member October 6, 1997 is being returned to you herewith, without any action James J. Reilly, JR. having been taken by the City of Rohnert Park. Council Memeber The claim is .being .returned because it was not presented within the time required by law. See California Government Code Sections 901 and 911.2. Your only recourse at this time is to file a written Application for Leave to Present a Late Claim as required by the Government Code. See Section 911.4 and 912.2, inclusive, and Section 946.6 of the Government Code. After this Application has been received by the City of Rohnert Park, it will be reviewed and considered. Under some circumstances, leave to present a late claim will be granted. See Section 911.6 of the Government Code. Also, your claim was not dated. Joseph D. Netter City Manager Due to legal time requirements, this should be done without delay. To determine if you have a further remedy, or whether further procedures are open to you, you may wish to consult with an attorney of your choosing. If you desire to consult with an attorney, you should do, so immediately. Very truly yours, X0KY OF ROHNERT PARK Lph DD Netter City Manager/Clerk 'c: City Councilmembers John Flitner, City Attorney Jeff Davis, General Manager, REMIF 6750 Commerce Blvd. Rohnert Park, CA 94928.2486 Phone: 7071793-7226 FAX: 707/793-7274 CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Public Works Date: 10/9/97 To: Joseph Netter. Ci anager From: Bill S of plfe ublic Works Manager Subject: Claim by Milford 1. Patsel I have reviewed the claim by Milford I. Patsel for damage to his property located at 7421, 7422, 7425, and 7427 Bridget Drive. Mr. Patsel claims that "excessive amounts of tree roots" have caused damage to his driveway and front lawn, and the sidewalk in front of his property. I have visited the site, and discussed the situation with Arborist Lew Edson. A few months ago, the Citv removed a large liquid amber tree that had damaged the sidewalk, then used a stump grinder to remove the obvious roots in Mr. Patsel's front yard. The City also replaced the damaged sidewalk. According to the claim submitted by Mr. Patsel, one of his tenants attempted to remove additional roots from the front yard in exchange for rent. The tenant rented a rototiller for this purpose. Mr. Patsel has submitted a claim for three items: driveway replacement; root extraction; and lawn replacement. The bill that he presented for the driveway replacement is dated 6/12/90, over seven years ago. This time period obviously surpasses the time restrictions noted on the claim form. The bill that Mr. Patsel submitted for the root extraction totals $588.00. Included in this bill is a $90.00 charge for "shed demolition', which reduces the claim for root extraction to $498.00. The lawn work has not been done, but Mr. Patsel is claiming $500.00 for lawn replacement. In my opinion, the City has been veru generous in this situation. Mr. Patsel has incurred no costs for tree removal, stump grinding of major roots on his property, and replacement of the sidewalk. In addition, he has benefited from the presence of the street trees in his area. The shade cast by street trees and some tree root encroachment are normal and anticipated conditions that affect lawn growth. The need to renovate a turf area following a tree removal is not unusual., Considering this fact, and the substantial participation of the City in removing the tree, grinding roots, and removing the sidewalk, I recommend that the claim of Mr. Patsel be rejected. If you have further questions regarding this, please contact me. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM TRANSMITTAL, REPORT Department: 6210-5310 * * *City Clerk Use Only * ** Meeting Date Held Until Submitted By: Caroline Gabriel % �°� 10/28/97®l. Purchasing Supervisor Item No. Item No. 97-194 Agenda Title: Resolution Calling for Sealed Proposals for New Dat f Action: Carpeting for the Dorothy Rohnert Spreckels Performing Arts Center Requested Council Action: Pass resolution calling for sealed proposals for new carpeting for the Dorothy Rohnert Spreckels Performing Arts Center. Summary: $23,000 is budgeted this fiscal year for new carpeting for the Performing Arts Center. Bids will be called for on the following types of product: 1. Broadloom/Rolled Commercial Carpet 2. Commercial Carpet Tiles - used in malls, hospitals, in the the City's Community Center, Sports Center, Public Safety, Public Works and in the Finance. Dept. 3. Creative Bid - theater quality, a product that makes the statement, "THIS ILS A PERFORMING ARTS CENTER!" All bids will have to meet the City's general specifications, warranties, etc. Samples will be provided by the City Manager for Council to review. CITY MtApproval GER'S RECOMMENDATION: �onsent Item O Regular Time () Pub 'c Hearing Required Recommended O Submitted with Comment () Policy Determination by Council O City Comments: City Manager's Signature: Date: City Clerk Use Only Council Action (If Other Than Requested) Vote: L1 RESOLUTION NO. 97-194 RESOLUTION CALLING FOR SEALED PROPOSALS FOR NEW CARPETING FOR THE DOROTHY ROHNERT SPRECKELS RESOLVED by the Council of the -City of Rohnert Park, California, as follows: That sealed proposals for new carpeting for the Dorothy Rohnert Spreckels fire engine for the Department of Public Safety are hereby solicited and the City Manager is directed to post as required by law a Notice Inviting Sealed Proposals for said program referring to the specifications on file in the City Offices, the first posting of which shall be at least ten (10) days prior to the time fixed for opening bids. Said sealed proposals shall be delivered to the City Manager of said City on or before 10:00 a.m. on November 24, 1997 said time being not less than ten (10) days from the time of first posting of said notice. Bids will be publicly opened, examined and declared on said day and hour and referred to and considered by the Council at its meeting at 7:00 p.m. on December 9, 1997. • DULY AND REGULARY ADOPTED this 28th day of October, 1997. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Mayor ATTEST: Deputy City Clerk VIDAK- FLORES MACKENZIE REILLY MARTINEZ SPIRO AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: S O N O M A Join the October 2, 1997 Lisa Bagwell Project Graduation Co -Leader 1158 Santa Cruz Way Rohnert Park, CA 94928 707/585-8448 Honorable Mayor Linda Spiro City of Rohnert Park 6750 Commerce Blvd. Rohnert Park, CA 94928 Dear Mayor Spiro, C O U N T Y Celebration! The Project Graduation Committee for Rancho Cotate High School is now planning for another successful all night graduation party on June 12th for the 1998 Senior Class. The Rohnert Park City Council has generously waived the Sports Center fee in the past. We are once again requesting the fee to be waived for the 1998 grad night party. Sincerely, .J Lisa Bagwell Project Graduation Co -Leader RESOLUTION NO. 97- A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK SUPPORTING THE "TAXPAYERS FED UP WITH MORE STATE BUREAUCRACY" COALITION WHEREAS, ever, day billions of dollars of critical building, engineering and design projects are underway from seismic retrofitting to flood -control to schools and hospitals: and WHEREAS, State regional and local governments are currently allowed the flexibility to contract with private firms, on a competitive basis, to design these projects; and WHEREAS, this process allows government the essential flexibility to use private firms to deliver a project on time and cost effectively; and WHEREAS, the so-called "Government Cost Savings and Taxpayers Protection Amendment' completely changes the process by giving the state bureaucracy a virtual monopoly on designing every project; and WHEREAS, this will thereby force cities, counties. schools, special districts, regional governments and even many private businesses to use the state bureaucracy to design roads. parks, hospitals, health clinics, schools, water treatment facilities, flood control walls and other critical structures ---including all engineering, design, geological and environmental work; and WHEREAS, virtually every school and hospital has been designed by private firms, not state government. and WHEREAS, local governments would not be able to hold the state bureaucracy accountable; and WHEREAS, taxpayers would pick up the tab for billions in extra costs for projects, delayed projects, lost jobs and more state employees to evaluate projects. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED that the City Council of the City of Rohnert Park opposes the so-called "Government Cost Savings and Taxpayers Protection Amendment" that is currently being circulated that will cost cities, counties, schools, special districts and the economy millions. BE IT FURTHER RESOLVED that the City of Rohnert Park supports the efforts of the growing coalition of "Taxpayers Fed Up With More State Bureaucracy (Fed Up)! DULY AND REGULARLY ADOPTED this 28th day of October, 1997. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK ATTEST: Mayor Deputy City Clerk FLORES MAv"i'ENZIE RE{LI.YV:CAh-M RTWEZ SPIRO AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: ELIMINATES LOCAL CONTROL. Local governments wouid lose control of vital transportation, flood control, mass transit, jails and other projects they are depending on. Under this initiative, those projects would effectively only be designed by state engineers. The complete lack of any engineering or architectural experience in the state controller's office, coupled with the enor- mous responsibilities of managing the process, would inevitably delay im- pc rtant projects such as replacing the Bay Bridge, construction of theAlameda Rail Corridor in Los Angeles and seismic retrofits throughout the state. The initiative would threaten safety. By elimi- nating private sector experts on important seismic and flood control URTS MINORITY AND WOMEN OWNED BUSINESSES. The COMPETITION KILLER Initiative backs away from twenty years of progress in diversifying the ownership of engineering and architectural. firms by depriving the design industry of a major portion of the current business. DIVERSE COALITION OPPOSES COMPETITION KILLER. City of San Jose, Los Angeles County, American Institute of Architects, Assock ated General Contractors of California, California Association of Sanitation Agencies, California Building IndustryAs- .at UP TO 100,000 BUILDING AND CONSTRUCTION TRADE JOBS ARE AT RISK! Engineering and architectural ser- �Ices are the "gateway' for con- struction jobs. Up to 100,000 build- ing and construction trade jobs could be lost in the first two years alone, as a result of construction delays caused by this initiative. projects proven experience would be ignored and safety compromised. That's why local governments including San Jose and Los Angeles County are opposed to the COMPETITION KILLER Initiative. soci ion, Consulting En- gineers and Land Sur- veyors of California, Cali- fornia Manufacturers As- sociation, California Busi- ness Properties Associa- tion, Asian American Ar- chitects Engineers Asso- ciation, California Minor- ity & Women Businesses Coalition, Interprofes- sional Council on Envi- ronmental Design, Paint- ing & Decorating Contractors of California, Contra Costa Transportation Authority, California Chamber of Com- merce, California Healthcare Associa- tion, California Highway Users Confer- ence, California Taxpayers' Association, California Transit Association, Coalition for Adequate School Housing, Santa Clara Valley Manufacturing Group. (Partial. List) Stop THE COMPETITION KILLER It Costs Jobs and Hurts Schools, Local Government and Women/Minority-Owned Business Spending nea#y $2 million, Professional Engi- neers in Ca/ifomia Government (PECGJ has paid to place on inl affve on the next state- wide ballot they claim helps taxpayers. But what this COMPETITION KILLER Initiative would really do is create a rigged bidding system that blocks private sector competi- tion, delays building newschools and hurts minority and women owned businesses. CREATES A RIGGED BIDDING SYSTEM. Buried in the fine print is a provision that rigs the system — virtually shutting out competition from private architects and engineers in building bridges, flood con- trol projects, schools, parks, highways and mass transit. 1PHere's how it works: The initiative would allow state costs to appear artificially low by ignoring essential job expenses such as employee compensation, rent, utili- ties, phones and office expenses as well as insurance, health and safety experts, legal and capital costs. California taxpayers would be forced to ante up billions of dollars to add thousands of new engineers to the state payroll. That's a staggering cost to rig the system against fair and honest private sector competition. DELAYS SCHOOL IMPROVEMENTS. Public education supporters have fought hard for additional funding to improve school buildings and build new classrooms. But the COMPETITION KILLER Initiative would tie these vital projects up in a bureaucratic knot. Eliminates local control over school construction. Virtually every, California school has been designed by private firms. But under this initiative, schools ef- fectively would be designed only by state engineers. Normal contract conditions, such as delivering a project on schedule and within the budget are conspicuously missing from this initiative. And local school districts would have no say in the process. The initiative also creates a huge new bureaucracy in the State Controllers of- fice that must review tens of thousands of projects. Because the measure specifies no deadline by which this of- fice must act, it would become a project bottleneck further delaying school projects that are needed now. A state bureaucrats group (Professional Engineers in California Government) has spent nearly $2 million to place an initiative on the next statewide ballot they claim helps taxpayers. But its really a Competition Killer. It would create a rigged bidding system to restrict private sector competition for design and engineering projects, increase taxpayer costs and delay building new schools and other vital projects. The Leaoue of California Cities joined dozens of local governments recently in the fight to defeat the Com- petition Killer Initiative. The core issue with the Competi- tion Killer Initiative is a simple one: Should virtually all design and engi- neering project development work for local gov- ernment be done by state employees instead of contractors hired and managed by local city councils and county super- visors? Any park, public works, school, road orjail project is captured by this initia- tive if any state funding is involved in- cluding bond funding — or if the state has any ownership, liability or respon- sibility for construction, operation or maintenance. California, not private contractors that are accountable to the needs of local cities. New State Bureaucracy Would Delay Local Projects Building new projects already takes too long. But this initiative would add a whole new layer of bureaucracy. The initiative requires that each and every I o c a I project be reviewed by the State Contmller's Office along with tens of thousands of other state, local and private building projects. Because the measure speci- fies no deadline by which this office must act, it would become arp oject bottleneck further delaying projects that are needed now. Normal contract conditions, such as delivering a project on schedule and within the budget are conspicuously missing from this initiative, and what's more local governments would have no say in the process. "The initiative would be e_rpected to reduce local control, create majorpo- tc-iztial delays of county projects, af- fect local jobs and economies and in- crease State Controller costs by about $1 million annually. " Cbunty of Los Angeles Eliminates local control over infrastructure projects. This initiative creates a rigged bid- ding system that effectively means most infrastructure projects would be designed only by the State of Schools Boards Say, "Stop the Competition Killer°' Concerned it would cause delays in school construction, the California School Boards Association (CSBA) representing more than 1,000 K-12 school districts throughout the state, joined the fight against the Competi- tion Killer. "This initiative reflects bad public policy and will have a profound effect on school districts," said CSBA Presk dent Juanita Haugen. "The initiative will likely result in fur- ther delays in the approval process for school construction. This comes at a time when districts are trying to find more classroom space to meet class - size reduction needs." Copy -Cat Legislation Amended Due to strong opposition from schools, health care and local govem- ments, the Competition Killer copycat bills (SB 479 and AB 376) were radi- cally amended as they left their houses of origin. Despite PECG's protestations to the contrary, these bills as introduced were identical to the PECG Initiative and did indeed apply to virtually all state and local infrastructure projects including school construction. They now only ap- ply to local and state transportation projects. Would a State Bureaucrats Group Really Spend $Z Million Just to Help TaxpaversP Its promoters would like you to believe their measure would protect taxpayers and ensure competitive bidding. But if that's true, why are the California Taxpayers' Associa- tion, California Chamber of Com- merce, California HealthCare Asso- ciation, Califomia.TransitAssociation, California Highway Users Confer- ence, California Minority and Womens Businesses Coalition among those who oppose it. Promoters Claims us. The Facts / CLAIM: The Competition Killer's Initiative Would Save Taxpayer Dollars Because State Engineers Are Cheaper than Private '� Sector Labo� R,".T. Initiative promoters base their claim on a deceptive study which bi- ases public sector costs downward by mixing in low-wage clerical staff and does not even consider over- head costs. Not taking overhead costs into ac- count is a very big mistake when you consider an agency like CALTRANS is much more top heavy than trans- portation departments in other states. A nationwide study found that CALTRANS administrative costs are almost twice as high as the national average. BOTTOM LINE: The Competition Killer Initiative in- creases taxpayers costs by up to $1.5 billion a year because the state would be forced to hire up to 12,000 new employees. PECG u. CALTRANS Decision In a disappointment for California taxpayers, the California Supreme Court recently ruled in favor of keep- ing some restrictions on private sec- tor design and engineering contracts. However, the court decision permits contracting out in cases where the state could not adequately and com- petently perform the work such as (1) personnel shortages, (2) earthquakes, (3) economic efficiencies (4) new state function and (5) higher skills. Despite the court decision, the Competition Killer Initiative remains on the ballot, and will become part of the California Constitution if adopted. The scope of the Competition Killer Initia- tive goes far beyond this court deci- sion in restricting private sector firms from competing for design and engi- neering contracts. The initiative cov- ers virtually every state, local, and pri- vate project including schoo!s, high- ways, transit, water projects, flood control and other key infrastructure projects. 100,000 LOST JOBS Except for its promoters, no one dis- putes that the Competition Killer Ini- tiative would create bureaucratic gridlock delaying thousands of public works projects. This means delays in construction funding for vital projects. And no con- struction funding means no construc- tion jobs. Conservative estimates are that 100,000 construction and related jobs would be lost in the first two years alone due to the construction delays caused by the Competition Killer. Taxpayers Fed Up With More State Bureaucracy (Fed Up!) - A coalition of business, engineers, architects and taxpayers 111 Anza Blvd., Suite 406 - Burlingame, CA 94010 - (415) 340-0470 - fax: (415) 340-1740 We gratefully acknowledge the financial assistance of CHN Hill and Kleinfelder, Inc. The NAP .E= � _..: N, Initiative SECTION 1. TITLE be known and may be cited as the 'Government Savings and Taxpayer Protection Amendment. SECTION 2. PURPOSE AND INTENT It is the intent of the people of the State of California in enacting this measure that engineering, architectural, and similar services pro- vided by the state and certain other entities be furnished at the low- est cost to taxpayers, consistent with quality, health, safety, and the public interest; that contracts for such services be awarded through a competitive bidding process, free of undue political influence; and that contractors be held fully responsible for the performance of their contracts. THEREFORE, THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA DO ENACT AS FOLLOWS: SECTION 3. REQUIREMENTS FOR CONTRACTS FOR ENGINEERING, ARCHITECTURAL AND SIMILAR SERVICES Article VII, section 12 is hereby added to the California Constitution to read: (a) This section shall apply to contracts for engineering, ar- chitectural, landscape architectural, surveying, environmental, or en- gineering geology services awarded by the state of California or b, anv state agency to any public or private entity. As used in this section, "state agency" means every state office officer, agency, de- partment, division, bureau, board, and commission but does not in- clude the University of California, the California State University and Colleges, and local public entities. "State agency" also includes a state agency acting jointly with another state agency or with a local public entity. As used in this section, "local public entity" means any city, county, city and county, including a chartered city or county, public or municipal corporation, school district, special district, authority, or other public entity formed for the local performance of governmental 2nd proprietary functions within limited boundaries. "Local public entity" also includes two or more local public entities acting jointly. (b)) This section sha.i also a cr: io ccr,:"z=:� r ser ., ces n subsection (a) arrarde- r•es when ntrac; awarcee o- ;fie puC:,o c es expenditure of slate fur.os cr involves a rrccra^. crc!= c`:pty cr cubl'.c work for %yhicn ire s' cr a7y sic`.=. - r.c'i e ownership. liabiiii . or rescons:biiity for ca^.s; uc[i.�^. ocere• _ �;n =fie As used in this section. -state funds` s all money appropna a penditure by the state or a state agency and all money included in special funds that the state or a state agency controls. (c) Prior to the award of any contract covered by this sec - the Controller shall prepare and verify an analvsis of the cost of c=, -- forming the work using state civil service empiovees and the cos: c' the contract. in comnanno costs. the cost of Derforming the v::-:: using state civil service employees snail inciuge =_:s to the state to Drovide the same services as the conaa_- tor. ano the cost of the contract snail include aii anticioated coni -a_: Gontnuei A bogus and deceptive title dreamed up by initiative promoters to deceive voters. Ask yourself: Would a_state _. 3ucmis uc:on really spent; miiuen to help taxpay- Promoters say their.intent is competitive bidding. If that's true why are the Caiimrnia Taxpayers' Association, Califor- r:i3 Chamber cf Commerce, Calim,nia Heaithcare Associa- iien, local schcel groups, cities and counties against it among many others? This section was written to hide what the measure would really do: create a rigged bidding system_to_,block_private sector competiticn from private architects and engineers in building bridges, flood control projects, schools, parks, highways, schools and prisons. This was written specifically by the state bureaucrats to capture all design and engineering work for bridges, high- ways, mass transit, prisons, schools, flood control and other projects. If it becomes law, the state.would be forced to hire up to 12,000 new employees at a cost of $1.5 billion a_year. i fie initiative would threaten saicty. By eliminating private sector experts on important seismic and flood control projects proven experience would be ignored and safety compromised. Almost every California school and hospital has been designed by private firms. isut under this section virtually all :croois, hdsD,;:iIS, hccd control levees and iaiis will be signed by state empioyees. ..zcai controi would be lost under this section because local projects could be held hostage by an unaccountable state bureaucracy. Normal contract conditions such as delivering a project on schedule and within budget are conspicuously missing from this initiative. And local governments would have no say in the process. 5 SeCtIOn crc_'ici a rlen ] b:; -= S)'St virtually shutting out competition_from.private architects_and engineers. Here's where the initiative wcuid alloy; state pureaucr: ld aco: — zaiiic;d:iv iorr by ignoring essential job expenses such as employee compensation, rent, utilities, phones and office expenses as well as insurance, health and safety experts, legal and capital costs. No such breaks for private companies, however, who must include these real- world expenses in their bids. costs and all costs to be incurred by the state, state agencies, and the contracting entity for the blccmg. evaivation, and contract award process and for inspecting, sueervisino, verifying. monitoring, and overseeing the contract. (d) The contract shall not ce awarded if either of the following conditions is met: (1) the C r.. _. _- s gra::.: concludes that state civil service employees can perform the work at less cost than the cost of the contract, unless the services are such an urgent nature that public interest, health, or safety rea.uires award of the contract; or (2) the Controller or the contracting entity concludes that the con- tract would not be in the public interest. would have an adverse im- pact on public health or safety, or would result in lower quality work than if state civil service employees Performed the services. (e) Except for contracts for which a delay resulting from the competitive bidding process would endanger public health or safety, every contract, including amendments, covered by this section that exceeds fifty thousand dollars ($50,000), adjusted annually to reflect changes in the appropriate consumer price index as determined by the Controller, shall be awarded through a publicized competitive bidding process involving sealed bids. Each contract shall be awarded to the lowest qualified bidder. If the contract cost based on the lowest qualified bid exceeds the anticipated contract costs the Controller estimated pursuant to subsection (c), the Controller shall prepare and verify a revised analysis using the contract bid cost, and that revised analysis shall be used in applying subsection (d). (f) For every contract covered by this section, the contractor shall assume full responsibility and liability for its performance of the contract and shall defend, and hold the state, the con- tracting entity, and their agents and employees harmless from any legal action resulting from the performance of the contract. (g) This section shall not be applied in a manner that will re- sult in the loss of federal funding to the contracting entity for con- tracts for service. SECTION 4. SEVERABILITY If any provision of this Amendment or its application to any person or circumstance is held invalid, that invalidity shall not affect other pro- visions or applications of the Amenament which can be given effect without the invalid provision or application, and to this end the provi- sions of this Amendment are severable. SECTION 5. APPLICABILITY OF CURRENT LAW These seaions would create a bureaucratic black hole for vital school, transportation, flood control, seismic safety and other projects. The initiative creates a virtual Public Works Czar by giving one politician — the state controller — enormous power to decide on tens of thousands of projects worth billions of dollars. TI". s ;est too pc;ver to .i:e cue boiirid:,::. Because the initiative specifies no aeadul:e by which this Public Works Czar must act, that office would become a project bctuer:.c:: indefinitely delaying vital school, highway, transit, Flood control and bridge projeas. The complete lack of any engineering or architectural experience in the state controller's office, coupled with the enormous responsibilities of.managing the process, woui:i inevitably delay important projects. sucn as replacing t Bay Bride, construction of the Alameda n_ii Corridor Los Angeles and seismic retroiits throu;nout me This bogus section talks about competitive bidding. But because or - rIR"ea cost-ccmparlson inere Pieii t be 1-bilr competitive biddi; 7 for design and engineering work. Only state bureaucrats will get these jobs, and taxpayers will pay the price. Contractors are already fully responsible for their work and can lose their licenses and current and future business if they don't perform. But �cSl°ii ccns:ata%IS iJ i .. OriSll :S tCr U.Masi ' , _. Others including the state oureaucr:_ Engineering and architectural services are the gateway to construction. As the state is denied these private sector services up to 100,000 private construction and related jobs could be lost in the first two years alone, as a result of construction delays caused by this initiative. Nothing in this Amendment shall expand or restrict the state's consti- The initiative would be :ccs .:i into t:a C tutional authority, as determined by decisions of the California Su- t;� 11 and would supersede all current procurement statutes. preme Court and California Courts of Appeal in effect on the effec- To correct any flaws, another constitutional ballot issue and statewide vote would be required. Even the legislature five date of this Amendment, to enter into contracts with private or couldn't correct the serious flaws. public entities. j SECTION 6. RELATIONSHIP TO OTHER MEASURES To the extent that any otner measure cn the same subject snail be on the ballot at the same election. it is the intent of the voters that this measure be deemed, to the maximum extent Possible, not to be in conflict with such other measure. o t miner that this measure should be harmonized with the other measure Taxpayers Fed Up With More State Bureaucracy 111 Anza Blvd. #406 Burlingame. CA 94010 (415) 340-0470 IN 9603E; RESOLUTION NO. 97 -� � v A RESOLUTION OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE ' CITY OF ROHNERT PARK AUTHORIZING CLASSIFICATION AND SALARY` FOR— CITY POSITIONS WHEREAS, the City accomplished a review and study of the positions listed below; and WHEREAS, the City Manager has reviewed said positions and has determined the Class Title, Class Salary Range and Rate, and Class Specification; and NOW, THEREFORE; PEE+IT: of Rohnert Park �t said % Class it. Specificationsr Senior Prograyns Programs ,Kr Specialist! l " Recr ion Director, which are adds ific-'orporated and approved., CLASS TITLE Senior Programs Assistant LVED by the Cit Ceucil of the -City 3s Salary ge and Rate and Class Cant, creation Specialist - Senior" ?ice grams, Recreation Supervisor and Resolution by reference, are r SALARY RANGE 66 X Recreation Specialist - Senior Programs Recreation Specialist - Sports Programs 75 X 75 X $2,568 - $3,122 $3,209 - $3,900 $3,209 - $3,900 \,-,Recreation-Supervisor 83 X $3,900 - $4,741 / Director:of Public Safety 103 M $6,625 - $8,052 • DULY AND REGULARLY ADOPTED this 28th day of October, .1997, with pay changes effective May 1, 1997. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Mayor ATTEST: Deputy City Clerk FLORES MACKENZIE REILLY VIDAK-MARTINEZ PIRO AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: TO: FROM: RE: DATE: INTER - OFFICE MEMORANDUM City of Rohnert Park Personnel Department Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman Copy to ,o Copy to Copy to Joseph D. Netter, City Manager Pamala Robbins, Personnel Manager Salary Range Changes for Certain Positions in Recreation and Public Safety October 22, 1997 Following a study, staff review and meeting with the City Council in closed session the following salary ranges were established as listed below to be effective May 1, 1,997. Please note the salary ranges listed under FROM are salary ranges as of May 1, 1997. Salary ranges listed under TO are salary ranges that became effective July 1, 1997. TO FROM RECREATION DEPARTMENT Senior Programs Assistant Senior Scheduler 66X $2568 - $3122 61X $2235 - $2716 Reclassification with new class specification. Recreation Specialist -Senior Programs Recreation Program Specialist - Senior Center 75X $3209 -$3900 68X $26.;'I - `071= Reclassification with new class specification. Recreation Specialist - Sports Programs Recreation Program Specialist - Sports 75X $3209 - $3900 68X $2644 - $3214 Reclassification with new class specification. Recreation Supervisor Recreation Supervisor 83X $3900 - $4741 81X 3640 - $4425 Salary range adjustment and updated class specification. Recreation Director Updated class specification. PUBLIC SAFETY DEPARTMENT Director of Public Safety 103M $6625 - $8052 Salary range adjustment. Director of Public Safety I03M $6309 - $7668 . City of Rohnert Park SENIOR PROGRAMS ASSISTANT DEFINITION Performs a variety of Senior Center activities; participates in planning and organizing programs and activities for seniors; develops and coordinates . fundraising events; distributes information to the public; compiles and prepares reports; performs other work as required. DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS The .Senior Programs Assistant is expected to perform a variety of duties related to senior activities and programs including organizing, coordinating events and prograins:-at the Senior Center and maintaining records and databases related to program participation. Incumbents may be required to provide back-up for other Senior Center staff. 'A Senior Programs Assistant should enjoy working with senior citizens and be able to.demonstrate patience and a sense of humor when necessary. The class is distinguished from the Senior Programs Specialist which oversees the operations of the Senior Center. SUPRVISION RECEIVED/EXERCISED General supervision is provided by a Senior Programs Specialist. This position -oversees assigned volunteers. EXAMPLES OF DUTIES Oversees a variety of programs and activities at the Senior Center; responds with information and referrals to a variety of inquiries about senior activities and programs; attends meetings related to Senior activities and programs; compiles and prepares monthly reports and statistics; develops and coordinates fundraising events; recruits, trains, schedules, and oversees volunteers; participates and chairs various committees; _writes articles for newsletters, prepares and distributes flyers and press. releases;- schedules -a variety of activities and events; maintains mailing lists; maintains a variety of records for reporting fiscal, statistical and other information; maintains inventory of inforrnational material. May perform a variety of office and clerical functions, including, but not limited to, typing, filing, copying, receiving and screening calls as needed. 7_ QUALIFICATIONS Experience/Education/Training Sufficient experience, education, and training to perform the duties of a Senior Programs Assistant. A typical way to obtain the required qualifications is to possess the equivalent of two years of experience in recreation, cultural, or other senior programs that ` included coordinating fund-raising events and preparing promotional materials. Page 2 of 2 pages Knowledge/Skill/AbilitX Knowledge of principles and concepts of senior recreational programs and activities; senior abuse reporting guidelines; basic principles of marketing and public relations; fundraising techniques; proper English usage, spelling, grammar and punctuation; basic mathematics; modern office practices, basic fiscal record keeping techniques. Ability to recruit and motivate volunteers; communicate effectively with persons of all ages and from a variety of backgrounds; prepare clear and concise publicity materials and reports; maintain records and databases; coordinate fund-raising activities; follow oral and written directions; establish and maintain cooperative working relationships including those in the business community and. non -profits; think clearly and act quickly in emergency or unusual situations; organize and prioritize work; keep supervisor up-to-date on the status of projects; compile information and prepare accurate reports; problem solve and handle complaints quickly and positively; maintain courteous and tactful, but professional relationships with the public and representatives of other agencies. Working Conditions Position requires prolonged sitting, standing, walking, reaching, twisting, turning, kneeling, bending, squatting, and stooping in the performance of daily activities. The position also requires grasping, repetitive hand movement, and fine coordination in the preparing statise.�..k' _ . pr:':. and ata, using a computer keyboard. Additionally, position requires near vision using.the computer, and hearing is required when providing phone and counter service. The need to lift, drag, and push files and computer reports weighing up to 15 pounds also is required. The position works with senior and the general public who may, at times, become ill or need special attention. LICENSE/CERTIFICATE Possession of a Class C California driver's license by date of appointment. City of Rohnert Park RECREATION SPECIALIST SENIOn -PROGRAMS DEFINITION Organizes, supervises, directs, and coordinates the programs, activities, and day-to-day operations of the Senior Center; recruits and provides training and supervision to assigned recreation program personnel; assists the Recreation Supervisor with a variety of tasks; performs other duties as required. DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS The Recreation Specialist in Senior Programs class has the daily responsibility for the operations of the Senior Center including program staff recruitment, activities, publicity, and coordinating necessary maintenance. Incumbents work with a great deal of independence and exercise independent judgment in overseeing programs, staff, and facilities. Because of the location and operating hours of facilities, close supervision should not be required nor expected. Incumbents have considerable public contact. This class is distinguished from the class of the Recreation Supervisor which has a responsibility for a broader scope of program delivery and more complex management activities. SUPERVISION RECEIVED/EXERCISED Direction is provided by the Recreation Supervisor responsible for the Senior Center. Supervisory responsibilities include direct and indirect supervision of full-time, part-time, and volunteer staff. ESSENTIAL DUTIES Plans, organizes, coordinates, and oversees Senior activities, programs and facilities; recruits, supervises, trains, assigns and evaluates work of staff, contractors, and volunteers in program delivery; ensures compliance with department policies, rules, and regulations.- initiates egulations;initiates recommended. changes to operation policies, programs, activities, and budgets; prepares the Center newsletter, program and event announcements, press releases, posters, calendars, and publicity brochures regarding activities for .Seniors; plans and coordinates excursions and other special activities; participates in, organizes, supervises, and coordinates fundraising activities; processes registration and collection of fees for programs; responds to complaints and requests for information regarding Senior facilities and programs; assesses recreational needs and programs for Seniors; provides information for the development of the department's budget recommendations and controls expenditures; orders supplies and.. materials necessary for assigned program delivery; arranges for Senior Center usage and setup through written agreements and booking procedures; arranges for repair and maintenance of equipment and vehicles, and oversees facility maintenance and security; prepares and maintains a variety of records, correspondence and reports; serves as a resource and referral of senior services; Page 2 of 2 pages QUALIFICATIONS Experience/Education Sufficient experience and education to successfully perform the duties of the Recreation Specialist - Senior Programs. A typical way of obtaining the required qualifications is to possess the equivalent of a Bachelor's degree in recreation administration or related field from an accredited college or university and one year of responsible work experience working_ with Senior recreation and facilities operations in a supervisory capacity. Coursework related to the field of Gerontology is desirable. Knowledge/Skill/Ability Knowledge of needs and social and recreation needs of Seniors; techniques, methods and procedures for scheduling and managing the delivery of Senior programs; facilities management; City and Recreation Department policies, rules, and regulations, modern office methods, procedures, and equipment; principles of personnel supervision and training;, techniques related to the design, coordination, and management of fundraising activities; marketing and publicity techniques for the promotion of activities and programs for Senior; safety procedures and policies applicable to public facilities and recreation programs; correct English usage, spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Ability to plan, organize, schedule, direct, coordinate, and supervise the delivery of recreational programs to,tSenior;,ensure compliance of program participants with established opcnti-I.. �1Mel; provide training on program activities and safety procedures; keep accurate records and activity reports; prepare clear, concise, and effective promotional materials; provide guidance, supervision, training, and motivation to staff and volunteers; hold effective meetings; tactfully and courteously deal with community groups, residents, and representatives of other agencies in developing and administering Senior programs; establish and maintain cooperative working relationships. Working Conditions Position requires prolonged sitting, standing, walking, reaching, twisting, turning, kneeling, bending, squatting, and stooping in the performance of daily activities.. The position also requires grasping, repetitive hand movement, and fine coordination in preparing written materials and using a computer key board. Additionally, the position requires near vision in reading correspondence and using a computer, and hearing is required when providing phone coverage and communicating in person. The need to lift, drag, and push materials weighing up to 25 pounds may also be required. Incumbents may, while overseeing facilities operations, be required to deal with patrons that become confused or ill. LICENSE/CERTIFICATE Possession of a Class C California driver's license by date of appointment. Possession of a First Aid and Cardio -Pulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) certificate issued by the American Red Cross or similar organization. 10/28/97 City of Rohnert Park RECREATION SPECIALIST - SPORTS PROGRAMS DEFINITION Organizes, supervises, directs, and coordinates the Adult sports programs, sports leagues and activities, the day -today operations of the Sports Center and other assigned programs and facilities; recruits, trains, and supervises to assigned recreation program personnel; assists . the Recreation Supervisor with a variety of tasks and responsibilities; performs other duties as required. DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS The Recreation Specialist in Sports Programs class has the daily responsibility for the operations of the Sports Center and for the supervision of adult sports programs including program staff recruitment, activities, publicity, and coordinating necessary maintenance. Incumbents work with a great deal of independence and exercise independent judgment in supervising programs, staff, and facilities. Because of the location and operating hours of facilities, close supervision should not be required nor expected. Incumbents have considerable .public contact. This class is distinguished from the class of the Recreation Supervisor which has a responsibility for a broader scope of program delivery and more complex management activities. SUPEFti ! , . w w_w CEI'�.�k:DiEXERCISED Direction is provided by a. Recreation Supervisor. Supervisory responsibilities include direct and indirect supervision of full-time, part-time, and volunteer staff. ESSENTIAL DUTIES Assists with the development and implements goals, objectives, policies, procedures and work standards for adult sports programs, activities and facilities; plans, organizes, coordinates, and supervises sports activities, programs and facilities; recruits, supervises, assigns, schedules and evaluates work of staff, contractors, and volunteers in program delivery; assists with the preparation, administration, and control of the budget for assigned programs and facilities; ensures compliance with department policies, rules, and regulations; maintains effective relations with a variety of community organizations, groups and the public; plans and promotes sports leagues, events, activities, and programs; prepares registration materials, rules, schedules, press releases and a variety of other publicity materials; supervises and develops weight training and provides alternative training methods for injured members and seniors; supervises and processes registration, membership sales, member and guest check-in, and fee collection; supervises the daily maintenance of the Sports Center; provides supervision for the Community Center during evening hours; handles complaints, protests, and enforces league rules; oversees all sports league operations; provides information regarding sports facilities and programs; assesses community recreational needs and programs; orders supplies and materials necessary for assigned program delivery; arranges for repair of equipment and oversees facility security; prepares and maintains a variety of records, correspondence and reports; serves as a resource regarding community recreation services; coordinates sports programs with other Department activities. Page 2 of 2 pages QUALIFICATIONS ELcperience/Education Sufficient experience and education to successfully perform the duties of the Recreation Specialist - Sports Programs. A typical way of obtaining the required qualifications is to possess the equivalent of a Bachelor's degree in recreation administration or related field from an accredited college or university and two years of responsible work experience working .with recreation and facilities operations in a supervisory capacity. Coursework in exercise physiology and kinesiology is desirable. Knowledge/Skill/Ability Knowledge of philosophy, principles and techniques of public recreation and physical fitness programs; exercise -physiology -and kinesiology; techniques, methods and - procedures -for scheduling, managing, and maintaining sports programs and facilities; laws, ordinances, regulations, policies, and rules. related to public facilities usage and maintenance; principles of personnel recruitment, supervision and training; marketing . and publicity techniques for the promotion of sports activities and programs; safety procedures and policies applicable to public facilities and recreation programs; correct English usage, spelling, grammar, and punctuation. Ability to plan, organize, schedule, direct, coordinate, and supervise the delivery of -recreational programs; ensure compliance of program participants with established operational policies;- handle complaints, protests, and enforce rules; tactfully and courteously deal with facility and program participants; provide training, on prograomt =r` act es an. -Af_..y procedures; keep accurate records and activity reports; prepare clear, concise, incl effective promotional materials; provide guidance, supervision, training, and motivation to staff and volunteers; hold effective meetings; tactfully and courteously deal with community groups, residents, and representatives of other agencies in developing and administering recreation programs; establish and maintain cooperative working relationships. Working Conditions Position requires prolonged sitting, standing, walking, reaching, twisting, turning, kneeling, bending, squatting, and stooping in the performance of daily activities. The position also requires grasping, repetitive hand movement, and fine coordination in preparing written materials and using a computer keyboard. Additionally,. the position requires near vision in reading correspondence and using a computer, and hearing is required when providing phone and communicating 'mi, person. -The need to lift, drag, and push materials weighing up to 25 pounds may also be required. Incumbents may, while overseeing facilities. operations, be required to deal with patrons that become aggressive. LICENSE/CERTIFICATE Possession of a Class C California driver's license by date of appointment. Possession of .a First Aid and Cardio -Pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) certificate issued by .the American Red Cross or similar organization. ions'97 City of Rohnert Park RECREA'T'ION SUPERVISOR - DEFINITION Organizes, directs, supervises, and coordinates the functions of assigned recreational programs and facilities; provides training and guidance to recreation program personnel; manages the scheduling, operations, and maintenance of recreational facilities; assists the Director of Recreation with a variety of administrative functions; performs other duties as required. : DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS The Recreation Supervisor class has the overall responsibility for the functioning' -of assigned programs and facilities. Incumbents work with a great deal of independence. and exercise considerable independent judgment in the management of programs and facilities. This class is distinguished from the class of Recreation Specialist by the breadth of responsibility and complexity of management activities. SUPERVISION RECEIVED/EXERCISED Direction is provided by the Director of Recreation. Supervisory responsibilities including direct and indirect supervision of full-time, part-time, contract e1-i.-,1.111D-y",.,,.s, d vonxr�teers: -: ESSENTIAL DUTIES Plans, organizes, coordinates, directs, and supervises the operations of assigned recreational programs and facilities; recruits, assists with the selection, assigns, and evaluates the work of personnel involved in the scheduling and delivery of sports and recreational programs including senior programs, adult and youth sports, leisure programs, aquatic activities, youth and teen programs, and special events; prepares or oversees the preparation of program and events announcements, press releases, posters, and publicity brochures-, :maintains records and prepares reports summarizing program activities, cost, and program effectiveness; provides information concerning program content and availability; assesses community leisure and recreation . program needs; supervises : or conducts -training and information sessions for employees; oversees the scheduling -and operations of City recreational facilities including the sports center, senior center, community pools, community center, and Rohnert Park Community Stadium, and other recreational facilities-, ensures compliance with Federal, State, and local laws and ordinances applicable to public facilities; oversees the purchasing of supplies and equipment necessary for program activities; assists with the planning and development of City recreational facilities; administers a variety service contracts, rental 'and- use agreements; represents the Department in meetings with community groups and commissions regarding recreational needs and program activities; sets fees and rental rates . fro programs and facilities; works with various non-profit groups on cooperative programs and events; assists with the preparation of the Department budget and control of the expenditure of allocated funds; oversees the general maintenance of facilities and related Page 2 of 3 pages equipment; supervises training and policy development to ensure safe work practices-, perfornis a -varie y of administrative assistance functions for the Director of Recreation; may serve as a member of the EOC team, may act in the capacity of the Director when delegated. QUALIFICATIONS Experience/Education Sufficient experience and education to successfully perform the duties of the Recreation Supervisor. A typical way of obtaining the required qualifications is to possess a Bachelor's degree in recreation administration or a closely related field from an accredited college or university and two years paid experience in recreational program design and facilities management in a supervisory or management capacity. Knowledge/Skill/Ability Considerable Knowledge of philosophy, principles, and techniques of comprehensive public recreation programs; laws, ordinances, and regulations pertaining to public facilities usage and maintenance including swimming pool and sports complex operations; principles of budgeting and expenditure control; contract negotiations and administration-, principles of personnel supervision and training; .techniques for evaluating the recreational ` ,u,,6 '-service, needs of the community; facilities, playground, and water safety, and first aid; techniques for scheduling and managing the delivery of large recreational programs; techniques of facilities inspection and record keeping; procedures and requirements for the proper reporting of elder and child abuse; techniques for the preparation of press releases, promotional and fund raising materials; mathematics; first aid techniques; proper English usage, punctuation, and grammar. Ability to plan, organize, schedule, direct, coordinate, and evaluate assigned recreational program and facilities activities of the City; provide supervision and training to recreation program staff, oversee multiple program and facilities activities; assess community sports, recreation, and leisure service needs and develop programs to meet those needs; assist with the preparation of budget requests and expenditure control; prepare a variety of reports and publicity material; successfully negotiate service, lease, and usage_ agreements; oversee the maintenance and development-- activities of recreational facilities; conduct fundraising activities; make effective public speaking presentations; tactfully and courteously deal .with community groups, residents, and representatives of other agencies Iin developing and administering recreational programs; establish and maintain cooperative working relationships. Working_ Conditions Position requires prolonged sitting, standing, walking, reaching, twisting, turning, kneeling, bending, squatting, and stooping in the performance of daily activities. The position also requires grasping, repetitive hand movement, and fine coordination in preparing statistical reports and data, using a computer key board. Additionally, the posi- Page 3 of 3 pages tion requires near, far, and color vision in reading statistical data and using the computer, and hearing is required when providing phcne,.and counter service. The need to lift, drag, and push equipment and materials weighing up to and in excess of 25 pounds also is required. Some activities may involve working outdoors, working under very noisy, conditions, actively participate in teaching sports skills, and require dealing with patrons that become aggressive. Incumbents may be exposed to heavy dust and pollen, and pesticides and chemicals used in parks and facilities maintenance. LICENSE/CERTIFICATE Possession of a Class C California driver's license by date of appointment. Possession of a First Aid and Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation (CPR) certificate issued by the AmericaRed Cross or similar organization. 10/28/97 City of Rohnert Park RECREATION DIRECTOR DEFINITION Plans, organizes, coordinates, and directs the operations, facilities, programs, objectives, service levels, community needs assessment, and revenue generation related to the provision of recreation and related community services for the City, performs other duties as required. DISTINGUISHING CHARACTERISTICS The Recreation Director has responsibility for developing and implementing recreation policies and programs for the City. The incumbent of this position oversees a number of public facilities and a variety of recreation and community service programs, sports, and aquatic services to the community. SUPERVISION RECEIVED/EXERCISED Administrative direction is provided by the City Manager. Supervisory responsibility entails direct and indirect supervision of supervisory program personnel and support staff. ESSENTIAL DUTIES Plans, directs, monitors, and evaluates recreation services, operations, facilities; programs, objectives, service .levels, community needs, and revenue generation; formulates and implements rules, policies, and procedures related to departmental operations,. programs and use of facilities; plans and directs the design and development of new facilities and programs -and improvements to existing facilities and programs-, prepares plans to meet community needs based on studies of conditions and projections of future composition of the community; develops plans and projects to generate and maintain revenues to support programs and operations; coordinates recreation functions and programs with the activities of other City departments; selects, supervises and trains staff; develops capital and operating budget recommendations including fee structure and controls fund expenditures; serves as staff liaison with the Parks and Recreation Advisory Commission; develops, prepares and administers program grants; develops marketing plans -and materials for recreation programs and facilities; develops and negotiates lease and joint - use agreements; provides advice and consultation to the City Manager on recreation programs, services and facility use issues; prepares reports, studies, and special projects; makes recommendations for the purchase of equipment and supplies; confers with, provides leadership, makes presentations, and coordinates with community groups, schools, -and organizations regarding recreation programs, citizen concerns, and policies-, serves as liaison with other government agencies; coordinates the City's emergency care _and shelter facilities; responds to the most sensitive complaints and inquiries regarding -Department operations .and -policies. Page 2 of 2 pages :. _.... QI,TA; ; 1 ATIONS Experience/Education Sufficient experience and education to successfully perform the duties of the Recreation Director. A typical way of obtaining the required qualifications is to possess the equivalent of Bachelor's degree in Recreation Administration or a related field and five years work experience in public recreation program management planning and development, including at least three years at a management or supervisory level.. Advanced education in public recreation management is desirable. Knowledge/Skill/Ability Thorough Knowledge of recreational, park, and facility needs of the local community; techniques for planning and organizing varied recreational activities; philosophy, principles, and techniques of providing comprehensive public recreation programs; development and maintenance of community recreation facilities; principles of budgeting and expenditure control; principles and techniques related to revenue generation. techniques for developing effective public presentations; principles of public relations; operations of community based organizations; principles of supervision, training, management, and public administration. Ability to plan, organize, schedule, direct, ... r� cc--,rdinate'. and evaluate vaned recreation programs of the City; provides & ¢ ,% :, supervision, and training for assigned staff, formulate, evaluate, and make recommendations on policies and procedures affecting the provision of recreation programs; evaluate facility development needs and programs; develop budget proposals and control expenditures-, provide professional advice to the City Manager, and others regarding recreation functions ' and activities; successfully negotiate and administer lease and other facilities agreements; prepare comprehensive and concise reports; make effective public speaking presentations; effectively represent the Recreation Department to citizens, community groups, and other government agencies; establish and maintain cooperative working relationships. Working_ Conditions -Position requires prolonged sitting, reaching, twisting, and turning in the performance of daily activities. The position also requires grasping, repetitive hand movement, and fine coordination in the preparation of reports and use of a computer keyboard. Additionally, the position requires near vision in reviewing plans, reading reports and correspondence and using a computer. Hearing is required when communicating by phone and in person. When visiting parks and City recreational facilities -the incumbent -may be required to walk on uneven and slippery surfaces, be exposed to dust and pollen. LICENSE/CERTIFICATE Possession of a Class C California driver's license by date of appointment. 10/28/97 Post-Itm brand fax transmittal memo 7671 #ofpsgeso. To From / Co. _ Co. Dept. Phone # Fax # Fax # MEMORANDUM TO: Jim Pekkain, Recreation Director Gtiy Miller, Recreation Supervisor Mary Hanlon, " Maya Van den Huevel, Recreation Programs Specialist Wendy Audiss, Recreation Programs Specialist Vicki Wilkerson, Senior Scheduler Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman Capt' to ia..?-7-97 is c Copy to i FROM: Jose h 4D. Netter, City Manager DATE: October 15, 1997 RE: Recreation Department Rate Changes The City Council, in closed session at its meeting of October 14, 1997, approved the following rate changes: (1) Senior Scheduler - 66X (2) Recreation Programs Specialist -Senior Center - 75X (3) " 11 -Sports Center - 75X (4) Recreation Supervisor - Sports Center - 83X (5) Recreation Supervisor - Community Center - 83X These approved salary and range changes will be scheduled for ratification on the Consent Calendar of the City Council Agenda on October 28, 1997. The City Council made these changes on a case-by-case basis .and recommended these ranges to correspond with the job duties and assignments for those positions within the City of Rohnert Park. If you should have any questions in regards to this matter, please feel free to give me a call. JDN:Ir c: Pamala Robbins, Personnel Manager City Councilmembers _RPEA (Attn: Sandy Lipitz & Diane Tomkins) October 20, 1997 Mayor Linda Spiro City of Rohnert Park 6750 Commerce Boulevard Rohnert Park, CA 94928 Re: Contract Progress Report Dear Mayor Spiro: ROHNERT PARK CHAMBER OF COMMERCE ro" 1012-0107 QYA"04c. Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Counc;.Iman Copy to o ,r Copy to Copy to The Rohnert Park Chamber of Commerce is pleased to make this preliminary six-week progress report. The four contract elements have been set up as task forces headed by Chamber Board Directors. Joe Dietzen is the Economic Development chair who will oversee these task forces. The task forces are: Business Retention, composed of the business retention teams; Business Development, composed of the V.I.P. Ambassador team, and responsible for creating the Rohnert Park Profile and overall marketing/business recruitment plan; Shop In Rohnert Park which is overseeing the program design; the "Recreation Destination" task force that will oversee the over all marketing/promotional plan that will target the various tourism and event planners markets. We have formed the V.I.P Ambassador team. It is composed of high level executives from the high tech companies, Sonoma State University, the Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School . District, the City Manager, and the Chamber's Board of Directors. We feel that it is important to have the Mayor be a member of this team as well. The purpose of this team is to be the official welcome team for business executives from . prospective companies considering Rohnert Park as a location. On occasion this team may meet with realtors representing companies. The Business Retention task force. has been formed. This task force is made up of Chamber members and lead by a Board Director. We are in the process of contacting all our members inviting anyone to be part of this team which is composed of ten visitation teams of two members each. Each team will fill out a survey on each visit with a business owner or executive. An orientation for these teams is tentatively scheduled for November 18, 1997. The business survey is being designed now. (707) 584-1415 • FAX (707).584-2945 EMAILChat-nber@rpnet.net • http://.www. business1.com/rpc/ 5000 ROBERTS LAKE ROAD, SUITE B ROHNERT PARK, CALIFORNIA 94928 We are in the process of inviting business members with specific experience in designing promotional retail campaigns to head up this task force. Chamber staff have received bids on producing the full color, magazine format Business Resource and Recreation Guide. We have completed the invitations to serve on the "Recreation Destination" task force. From Sonoma State University we have department heads from the Athletic Department, Music and Theater Arts, and a marketing expert from SSU Enterprises. We have also asked the owners and managers of various recreation facilities (both City and private) to be members of this task force. Chamber staff has been interviewing marketing and advertising firms for bids on creating a visual image for Rohnert Park and designing the promotional materials for a comprehensive local and national marketing plan. The Chamber hired a professional photographer who has just completed photographing all the recreational facilities (City and private) in the City. We have obtained permission to have a display in the California Welcome Center and Sonoma County Wine & Visitors Center. Staff is proceeding to have a full page Rohnert Park co-op advertisement and Rohnert Park section designed for the Vintage Views Visitors Guide published by the Sonoma County Convention & Visitors Bureau. This will be the first time that Rohnert Park has had its own section in this publication. It is mailed nationwide and is one of their main printed marketing pieces. The Chamber's new Web Page is up and currently undergoing detail modifications. It will contain comprehensive information on the City as well as that on Chamber members and functions. We have had initial discussions with City staff about including business license applications, building permit information and Parks and Recreation information and calendar. The Chamber's newsletter will go online and we can accommodate the City's newsletter should that be desired. On behalf of the Board of Directors and the many Chamber members involved in bringing about all of the above, I am proud and pleased to give you this update. We feel that in six weeks we have made excellent progress. Sincerely, Robin Bleckwehl, President cc: Joe Netter, City Manager Members Chamber Board of Directors .r �llgp QM►'rc All Feahiring �( Equus Restaurant Our Sonoma County Harvest Fair Sweepstakes Winner Equus restaurant is one of the two highest AAA rated -staurants in all of Sonoma County. . GOLF, CYCLING, and GREAT ESCAPE PACKAGES at only $8450 (Per Person/Double Occupancy) 101 Fountaingrove Parkway • Santa Rosa (707) 578-6101 or (800) 222-6101 http:/www.Fountaingrove Inn.com The American Express® Card is warmly welcomed at fine establishments throughout Sonoma County, such as Fountaingrove Inn. Cards M Sonoma County has the size to match its diversity of attractions. It stretches all the way from the Cameros winegrowing area to the east, touches San Pablo Bay, extends through dozens of wine appellations and stately redwood forests before following the Russian River out to the Pacific Ocean. The town of Sonoma contains the northernmost in the chain of California Missions and was the birthplace of California's winemaking industry. Coastal areas are blessed with many fine beaches and a Fishing Fleet that provides fresh fish for the tables of many local restaurants. The Russian River meanders through vineyards and redwood forests before it meets the ocean at lenner. Backroads abound with family farms offering locally -grown foods, specialty plants, and up -close viewing of a variety of birds and animals. The Sonoma wine country produces some of the finest vintages in the country, year after year. Scores of fine restaurants dot the county. Accommodations range from campgrounds and charming Bed & Breakfast Inns to luxury hotels adjacent to golf courses or world class spas. No other county in the state offers such diversity. The wine alone makes the trip worthwhile, and the addition of farm visits, historical lore and other attrac- tions lend further enrichment to the travel experience. We welcomeyour visit to the area, and hopeyou find this guide useful inyour enjoyment of its attractions. M Calendar of Events...................................................................... M Adventures & Attractions............................................................ SonomaCounty Map.................................................................. M Destinations: Santa Rosa & Rohnert Park ................................ Petaluma & Cotati............................................. Healdsburg & Windsor ...................................... Cloverdale & Geyserville.................................... Russian River .................................................... Sebastopol, Freestone, Forestville, Occidental ...... Sonoma Coast .................................................. SonomaValley .................................................. M Vines, Visitors & Sonoma County ................................................. By Don Sebastiani MWine Map................................................................................. 11111111 List of Wineries ....................................... 11111111 Farm Trails .............................................. = Bed & Breakfast Inns ................................ 1•fB Hotels & Motels ...................................... = Museums & Historical Sites ...................... M Brew Pubs & Microbreweries .................... 111111110 Restaurants ............................................. 11® What is "Wine Country" Cuisine? .............. By John Ash = Services To help makeyour traveling decisions even easier, we inviteyou to call our Visitor Hotline at (707) 586-8100. This phone number isyour easy access to: lodging, special attractions, transportation, entertainment, dining, recreation and leisure throughout Sonoma County allyear long. We are open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week. http://www.visitsonoma.com/ sccvb@visitsonoma.com ...... 2-4 ...... 5 ...... 6-7 ...... 8-9 ...... 1 1-12 ...... 13-14 ...... 22-23 ...... 24-25 ...... 26 ...... 32-33 ...... 36-37 ...... 16 ...... 17 ...... 18-21 ...... 25 ...... 28-29 ...... 30-31 ...... 34 ...... 35 ...... 38,40 ...... 39 E, raw, EI Sonoma County Convention & Visitors Bureau 5000 Roberts Lake Road, Suite A Rohnert Park, CA 94928 (707) 586-8100 Fax: (707) 586-81 11 Estelle Miller, President and CEO Sheree Green, Film Commissioner Patricia DiRuocco, Director or Sales lulianna Lualemaga, Service Coordinator Catherine DePrima, Office Manager Benefield, Levinger, McEndy & Vernon, Publishers V HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Enjoy the numerous festivals and events during your visit to Sonoma County. Listed below are a few of the popular events. Dates are subject to Change. We suggestyou call ahead to confirm details. For a complete listing of events please call 1-707-586-8100, extension 1750. JANUARY 18-19 Winter Wineland. The Alexander, Dry Creek and Russian River Valley Wineries 800-723-6336. W ,15-16 Old Time Fiddle Contest I Oam- I Opm. Cloverdale Citrus Fairgrounds. Cloverdale 894-9550. FEBRUARY Romancing the Vine Fundraiser, Sonoma County Museum, Santa Rosa 579-1500. Citrus Fair I Oam-10 m Cloverdale Citrus Fairgrounds. Cloverdale 894-3992. MARCH APRIL, 12-13 Fisherman's Festival & Parade, Bodega Bay 875-3422. 26 Butter & Eggs Days Parade. Hometown Parade features Petaluma's history as the World's Egg Basket. Cutest Little Chick contest, Floats, food booths. Parade at noon. Petaluma 762-2785. 26-27 26-27 1-4 Russian River Wine Road Barrel Tasting - IBth Annual. Healdsburg. 4 800-723-6336. Wine Country Classic Bike Race. Over 800 racers will compete in two day event 17 including 100 mile race. Santa Rosa 579-0413. Sixth Annual Heart of the Valley Barrel 22-24 Tasting. Tickets must be purchased in advance. 12- 4pm. Sonoma 833-5891. Apple Blossom Festival & Parade, 51st Annual, Ives Park, Sebastopol 823-3032. Passport to Dry Creek... Wine tastings, wine ryy and vineyard tours & food pairing. Healdsburg 433-3031. MAY Thursday Night Market. Open air farmers' market and street fair held every Thursday night May 29 through September 4. Santa Rosa. 524-2123. NASCAR Winston Cup Race, Sears Point Raceway. Sonoma 938-8448. Cinco de Mayo Festival, continuous music and entertainment. Finley Park in Santa Rosa 526-7744. Luther Burbank Rose Parade & Festival, Downtown Santa Rosa & lulliard Park, Santa Rosa 544 -ROSE. Healdsburg Country Fair. Twilight Parade on the 22nd at 6pm. Competitions, livestock auction, & more. Healdsburg 431-7644. SAMPLE THE HISTORY ... and the Wines... OF When early Sonoma Valley settler �� Joshua Chauvet established the first LEIN LE gristmill by Sonoma Creek to Glen Ellen in the 1800s, domestic postage was just 24. Once he got the mill wheel turning he also ran the first lumberyard, brickyard and hotel in the tiny town. If that wasn't enough, in 1875 Chauvet planted grapes and began producing wine and brandy. Postage remained at 24 and the wheel was still turning when the Pagani family acquired the property in 1913, and continued producing wines at the site until the 1960s. Today, the building houses the Glen ^` Ellen Winery Tasting Room and History Center. Postage is now 324 I and, although the wheel still turns in 1191111111 I i ' the millrace, most folks now get�� their flour from a store in town. But you won't find a better place to enjoy a taste of local history and easy drinking Glen Ellen wines. Stop on by. We'll even show you a picture of old Josh. Open daily 10 a.m.- 5 p.m. THE GLEN ELLEN WINERY TASTING ROOM AND HISTORY CENTER Jack London Village • 14301 Arnold Drive • Glen Ellen, CA 95442 • (707) 939-6277 Tr HOTLINE 707-586-8100 19 Healdsburg Harvest Century Bicycle Tour. I 1 th Annual. Road and Mountain Bikes welcome. Routes wind through Alexander. Russian River & Dry Creek Valleys. Rest stops. lunch & sag wagon support. 433-6935. 22-8/4 Sonoma County Fair. Annual county fair. Sonoma County Fairgrounds. Santa Rosa 545-4200. 26 Living History Day, Fort Ross State Park, Sonoma Coast 847-3286. AUGUST 16 Petaluma River Festival. Petaluma Riverfront. Celebrate our river's heyday with ISO+ craft/food booths, entertainment, boat rides. 7am- I I pm. Petaluma 762-5331. 23-24 Intertribal Pow Wow. Sonoma County Fairgrounds Santa Rosa 523-3300. 23-24 Seventh Annual Cotati Accordion Festival at La Plaza Park. I am-7pm. Cotati 664-0444. 23-24 Bodega Bay Seafood Art and Wine Festival. Outrageous selection of seafood delicacies, arts, wine, microbrewed beer, kids' activities and entertainment. Bodega Bay 824-8404. 25-29 Sonoma Fest '97. Sears Point Raceway. Sonoma 938-8448. 30-9/1 Sonoma Valley Harvest Wine Celebration. Weekend celebration includes picnic, live auction, dinner barbecue and dancing. Sonoma 935-0803. SEPTEMBER 27-28 Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival. Sonoma Plaza. Two day. Historical re-enactments, blessing of the grapes. Sonoma 996-2109. 27-28 Weekend Along the Farm Trails, various Sonoma County locations, 824-2060. 28 Semi -Annual Petaluma Outdoor Antique Faire - Kentucky Street downtown. 215+ vendors. 8am to 4pm Petaluma 763-7686. OCTOBER 3-5 Sonoma County Harvest Fair. Sonoma County Fairgrounds. Santa Rosa S45-4203. (Continued on page 4) $ HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 E World Class Health Club 5 Tennis Courts Golf and Spa packages 0 �ES O R T H T E L G FIT N E S S C E N T E R 2777 4th Street Santa Rosa, CA 95405 (707) 545-8530 (800) 848-8300 http://www.flamingoresort.com email: infor@flamingoresort.com SONOMA WINE COUNTRY'S FINEST 31 Black Bart Festival - All Day. Trade Show, events and DESTINATION entertainment. Dinner, Dance. Cloverdale 894-4470 31-6/1 36th Annual Plaza Art & Artisan Show, Fine arts and crafts RESORT HOTEL on the Sonoma Plaza. Valley of the Moon Art Association. Sonoma 996-21 15. JUNE On 10 acres nestled 14-15 Seventeenth Annual Cotati Jazz Festival. Selected Cotati into the foothills Taverns & Restaurants. 1-6pm. Cotati 584-2222. of Santa Rosa 14-15 Grainassance Faire, Celebrating the renaissance of craft breads and brews. Jack London State Park, Glen Ellen 166 Deluxe Rooms 939-9666. 18-22 Sonoma -Marin Fair. Annual county fair Petaluma Fair- and Suites grounds. Petaluma 763-0931. 21-22 Festival of the Arts. Top Quality artisans along with entertain- Terrace Grill Restaurant, ment, ethnic food booths and wine tasting. Duncans Mills Comfortable Cuisine, 824-8404. Friendly Service, and 28-29 Hot Air Balloon Classic, 9th Annual, Airport Business Park, the Best View in Town Windsor 838-3737. JULY 4 Parade & Old Fashioned Celebration. Sonoma Plaza. Parade Flamingo Cabaret at I Oam. Food, booths, art show & games 1 I am to 5pm. Live Entertainment Fireworks at dusk. Sonoma 938-4626. 4 World Championship Pillow Fights, 30th Annual Fourth of Convention Facilities July Celebration. Kenwood Plaza Park on Warm Springs Road. 7:30am 3K and I OK foot race. I Oam parade, pillow fights gam 'til late afternoon. Kenwood 833-2440. Heated 25 -meter Pool 18-20 Salute to the Arts, Sonoma Plaza. I Oam to 6pm. 12th &L in the beautiful Annual. Art, drama, music, food & wine. Sonoma 938-1133. 1PIFlamingo gardens 19 Healdsburg Harvest Century Bicycle Tour. I 1 th Annual. Road and Mountain Bikes welcome. Routes wind through Alexander. Russian River & Dry Creek Valleys. Rest stops. lunch & sag wagon support. 433-6935. 22-8/4 Sonoma County Fair. Annual county fair. Sonoma County Fairgrounds. Santa Rosa 545-4200. 26 Living History Day, Fort Ross State Park, Sonoma Coast 847-3286. AUGUST 16 Petaluma River Festival. Petaluma Riverfront. Celebrate our river's heyday with ISO+ craft/food booths, entertainment, boat rides. 7am- I I pm. Petaluma 762-5331. 23-24 Intertribal Pow Wow. Sonoma County Fairgrounds Santa Rosa 523-3300. 23-24 Seventh Annual Cotati Accordion Festival at La Plaza Park. I am-7pm. Cotati 664-0444. 23-24 Bodega Bay Seafood Art and Wine Festival. Outrageous selection of seafood delicacies, arts, wine, microbrewed beer, kids' activities and entertainment. Bodega Bay 824-8404. 25-29 Sonoma Fest '97. Sears Point Raceway. Sonoma 938-8448. 30-9/1 Sonoma Valley Harvest Wine Celebration. Weekend celebration includes picnic, live auction, dinner barbecue and dancing. Sonoma 935-0803. SEPTEMBER 27-28 Valley of the Moon Vintage Festival. Sonoma Plaza. Two day. Historical re-enactments, blessing of the grapes. Sonoma 996-2109. 27-28 Weekend Along the Farm Trails, various Sonoma County locations, 824-2060. 28 Semi -Annual Petaluma Outdoor Antique Faire - Kentucky Street downtown. 215+ vendors. 8am to 4pm Petaluma 763-7686. OCTOBER 3-5 Sonoma County Harvest Fair. Sonoma County Fairgrounds. Santa Rosa S45-4203. (Continued on page 4) $ HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 E World Class Health Club 5 Tennis Courts Golf and Spa packages 0 �ES O R T H T E L G FIT N E S S C E N T E R 2777 4th Street Santa Rosa, CA 95405 (707) 545-8530 (800) 848-8300 http://www.flamingoresort.com email: infor@flamingoresort.com (Continued From P 3) I I World Wristwrestling Championships. Mystic Theater in Petaluma. Entrants vie for the World Title. Fee. Petaluma, 778-1430. 18 Beer & Sausage Tasting, Villa Chanticleer, 4-7pm. Healdsburg. 433-0339. 18 Harvest time in the Alexander Valley. Vineyard tours, barrel samplings, vertical castings, food & wine pairings. 431-2894. NOVEMBER 22 Downtown Santa Parade, Downtown Santa Rosa, 4th & E Streets, Santa Rosa, 544 -SHOP 29 Santa's Steamboat arrival and AntiQue Wagon procession. Santa arrives at the Petaluma Riverfront on the Tule Princess steamboat (Noon). AntiQue wagons, decorated horse teams, fairy tale characters Petaluma, 769-0429. /007N-11% DECEMBER 1-31 Whale Watching on the Sonoma Coast. Bodega Bay. 875-3422. 6-7 Holiday Open House, 18th Annual, Luther Burbank Home & Gardens, Santa Rosa. 524-5445. 7 Heritage Homes Christmas Parlor Tour. Victorian parlors decorated for the holidays. Petaluma, 762-3456. 13 Holiday Lighted Boat Parade. Downtown Petaluma River Harbor. Flotilla of decorated boats on parade. ETA 6:30pm. Petaluma, 778-1833. 31 New Year's Gala, Villa Chanticleer. Music beginning at Bpm. Hors d'oeuvres and no -host bar. Healdsburg, 431-7346. 31 First Night Celebration. A nationwide celebration of arts in downtown Santa Rosa. Thousands of people enjoy a sober, family- oriented celebration of the New Year through art and entertainment. Santa Rosa. S79-2787. -- -- -- - - - - -- -_1x • 11,000+ Square Feet of • The Sonoma County Wine Flexible Meeting Space and Visitor Center • 36 Holes of • Adjacent to the Championship Golf Doubletree Plaza • 2 Tennis Courts and • Only 45 Minutes Across Fitness Facility from the Golden Gate Bridge • Courtyard, Pool • AAA Four Diamond—nine and Jacuzzi years in a row Come play with us. (707) 584-J466 0 (800) 222 -TREE One Doubleti& Drive, Rohnert Park, CA 94928 (Formerly Red Lion Hotel) 1997 Vintage Views Contributors Copywriting: Photography: John Ash Bruce Fleming John McEndy Yvonne Horn Liz Porter C. A. Pavlinac Don Sebastiani Bruce Shippee Design: M.J. Wickham Mark Francis Production: Anne Vernon Mark Francis Art Zadina Eva Rieder I11ustrdti0n: Margo VanMidde Mark Francis Anne Vernon Anne Vernon Art Zadina in Sonoma & NTaa CIE", SONOMA CATTLE CO. "Experience the tradition of the old West in the California Wine Country." P. O. Box 877 Glen Ellen, CA 95442 I' HOTLINE 707-586-8100 Ballooning Aerostat Adventures 707-579-0183, 800-579-0183. www.aerostat- adventures.com Balloon Flights over the Wine Country. Single hop Flights originate from J. Winery & Rodney Strong vineyards. Champagne brunch & Flight certificate with photo of balloon. Sonoma Thunder 2508 Burnside Rd., Sebastopol, CA 95472. 707-538-7359, 800-759-5638. Wine Country Balloon, Safari and Wine Tours. Full service destination management company specializing in balloon Flights, ground transportation & accommodations. Bicycling Getaway Bikes Tours/ Rentals/Adventures 1757 Pine Ave., Petaluma, CA 94954. 800 -499 -BIKE. Fully supported bike tours. Bike, hike, sea kayak, rock climbing combo trips. Individual/groups. Petaluma & Healdsburg info. www.getawayadventures.com Rincon Cyclery Bike Rentalsfrours, 4927 Sonoma Hwy, Santa Rosa, CA 95409. 707 -538 -0868/800- 965 -BIKE. Hybrids front and full - suspension mtn bikes, tandems, car racks. Hourly, daily, weekly, custom tours. Spoke Folk Cyclery Fountaingrove County Club 1525 Fountaingrove Pkwy., Santa Rosa, CA 95403. 707 -579 -GOLF. Championship course, Ted Robinson design, slope rated 135, challenging fairways, great vistas. Mountain Shadows Golf Resort 100 Golf Course Dr., Rohnert Park, CA 94928. 707-584-7766. Two distinctive championship courses, driving range, pro shop, restaurant. The County's best golf value. MCN. The Sea Ranch Golf Links The Sea Ranch, CA 800 -SEA - RANCH. 18 championship length, Scottish style links course, Blues rated 136 and White 130. Pro shop driving range, snack bar and lodging. Champagne Balloon 'flights !,800.579�0183 707-433-7171. Bike Rental/ Tours. 249 Center St., Healdsburg on the Plaza. Renting Bianchi road and hybrid bikes, full service shop, clothing and accessories. E -Mail: spokefolk@aol.com. Golf Sonoma County Golf Courses 320 West Third St., Ste. 134, Santa Rosa, CA 95401. 800-464-5800. Featuring 15 challenging courses. Discover our Quality, variety & value. Call for free brochure & info. Bodega Harbour Golf links 21301 Heron, Bodega Bay, CA 94923. 707-875- 3538. 18 hole seaside links by Robert Trent Jones. Sonoma County's finest golfing experience. Public invited. J Hour Wine Country Tour & Tastin ^t .00 per Person' torlet us help you plan a customized ,r or, trip in one of our six to twelve - passenger, fully equipped limousines, available for all occasions. (707) 939-7225 (800)294-6386 'Chaff -red limousine tours Ieawng dally at 10 am. Please phone ahead for information and/w reservations. Some restrictions may apply. TCP 967965 Sonoma Golf Club 17700 Arnold Dr., Sonoma, CA 95476. 800-956-4653, 707- 996-0300. 4 -Star Public Golf Course (rated by Golf Digest). Fees include cart. Soft spike mandatory. Only 45 mi. north of San Francisco. Bar & Restaurant. Windsor Golf Club 6555 Skylane BI., Windsor, CA 95492. 707 -838 -PUTT (7888). A creek, lakes and oak trees make this 18 hole championship course one of the toughest but most enjoyable in Northern California. Former site of PGA golf event. Horseback Riding Chanslor Riding Stables 707-875-2721, 2660 Coast Hwy. One, Bodega B 94923. 730 acre working horse ranch offers mileay, s of ocean beach, sand dune, canyon, wetland and vista trails. Spectacular views! Beginner to advanced. Experienced guides. Groups welcome. Sonoma Cattle Co./Napa Valley Trail Rides In both Sonoma & Napa Valleys. PO. Box 887, Glen Ellen, CA 95442. 707-996-8566. Experience the Old West on horseback. Pristine forests, spectacular trails, views & wonderful horses. Call for ride info & brochure. OPEN-AIR BACKROAD AND OFF ROAD GUIDED EXCURSIONS. ir HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 LA POINT Y PARK • Annapolis The Sea Ranch • Stewarts Poinf,,- Q SALT POINT'S STATE PARK KRUSE 4�e`L RHODODEND '0 o STATE RESERVE Timber C • FORT ROSS STATE HISTORIC PARK 6> OREGON I Sonoma County NEVADA San Francisco Los Angeles Clc Lake Sonoma Asti LAKE SONOMA RECREATION AREA 1 L art's Point11001Y Dry Cr Valle AUSTIN CREEK RECREATION AREA Cazadero,!,o ARMSTb REDWC Meyers � STATE h Grade Road Du Monte R SONOMA COAST STATE •Rio ido BEACH Occidenta � 1 • Salmon C, Frees e * • Bodega • Boc gay DORAN REGIONAL PARK j MENDOCINO COUNTY N^ LAKE • Geyservill Alexander COUNTY 101' Valley eek 'y �• UNT Jimtown ST.HELENA 128 Im 'ONG )ODS 'ESERVE Healdsburg oMark West Sprin • Knights Valley N SHILOH RANG COUNTY PARK REGIONAL PARK 12 Sonoma Countgs Onlg FOUR STAR GOLF COURSE! GREAT COURSE... GREAT PROSHOR.. GREAT RESTAURANT. 4SONOMA coLFLUB 17700 Arnold Drive, Sonoma 45 miles north of San Francisco (500) 956-4653 (707) 996-0300 HOOD \-- MOUNTAIN REGIONAL PARK &/ NAPA COUNTY 7 SUGARLOAF RIDGE STATE PARK Sebastopol STATE PARK ] • lcenwoop 6 Ro norf *-- I � — alifornia* park JACK LONDON • VE10NAL Welcome Center STATE HISTORIC Bloomfield SONOMA PARK Cotafl STATE • Boyes Hot Penn rove UNIVERSITY Sonoma SONOa • Two Rock g Petaluma wiunai ATE PETALUMA MARSH Z, STATE WILDLIFE ARE Aden Gate Bridge & Francisco- 2 rancisco g 28 m s South GIZ01:14 STA rings STATE ARK Y�37 San Pablo Bay Sonoma County Santa Rosa Rohnert Park Shclld ROSd The city of Santa Rosa, at 36 square miles, *is the largest in Sonoma County. Santa Rosa's growth has been balanced by a natural beauty and temperate climate that has proved attractive to residents and tourists as well. It was recently named an 'All American City", for outstanding community accom- plishment. The economic base is agriculture, manufacturing, service, finance, government, and tourism. Centrally located within striking distance of all the wine growing areas in the County, Santa Rosa has within its limits and environs a variety of hotel accommodations as well as shopping and dining. The carefully preserved home &gardens of Luther Burbank in downtown Santa Rosa. Golf courses surround Santa Rosa. The Fountain Grove Country Club is a Ted Robinson 18 -hole course complete with bonsai, stone sculptures and other landscap- ing refinements that reflect the taste of the Japanese owner. There are three other 18 - hole Robinson courses: one at the Fairground Golf Center and two at Oakmont, as well as 18 -holes at Bennett Valley and a nine hole par 29 course at Wikiup. The Sonoma County Museum offers historical and art exhibits, graphics and landscape art. The city also boasts a uniQue recreational opportunity in the North Bay's only ice skating rink. The facility was the brainchild of Santa Rosa resident Charles Schulz, creator of the enormously popular "Peanuts" comic strip. The rink houses a display of original drawings, awards, photos, memorabilia and a souvenir gift shop. Santa Rosa was also home to famed botanist Luther Burbank, and his home and gardens are preserved and open for touring by visitors. Burbank once said of the area: "I firmly believe from what I have seen this is the chosen spot of all the earth as far as Nature is concerned." The Luther Burbank Center for the Performing Arts features ayear-long schedule of top rated music, dance and dramatic entertainment. Believe it or not, there is actually a Robert Ripley Museum in Santa Rosa with memora- bilia assembled in the Church of One Tree, named because all the wood used in its construction came from the same giant redwood tree. Santa Rosa native Ripley traveled the world over collecting examples of the unusual and bizarre side of the human $ HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 "Ifirmly believe from wbai I have seers this is the chosen spot of all the earth as far as Nature is concerned." -Luther Burbank Jl�l1 Ru, 777"M Destination I Santa Rosa Chamber of Comerce 637 First St. Santa Rosa, CA 95404 tel: 707-545-1414 www.santarosachamber.com Greater Santa Rosa Convention & Visitors Bureau 9 Fourth St. Santa Rosa, CA 95401 tel: 707-577-8674 fax: 707-571-5949 www.visitsantarosa.com email: visitsr@visitsantarosa.com Rohnert Fllark Chamber of Comerce 5000 Roberts Lake Rd., Suite B Rohnert Park, CA 94928 tel: 707-584-1415 email: Chamber@rpnet.net ANTA ROSA PLAZA.. For t finest selee on of store ju In Sonoma County w [, K I A 1 1 N++ V jp CONVENTIONS 't VISITORS BUREAU` THINGS TO DO Complete calendar of events PEOPLE TO SEE Theater, music, shows & artists PLACES TO BE Restaurants, wineries, accommodations Get City Smart... 9 Fourth Street, SANTA RosA PLAZA, Santa Rosa OFF HIGHWAY 101 DOWNTOWN EXIT IN SANTA ROSA • MACY'S, MERVYN'S, SEARS PLUS Historic Railroad Square 707-577-8674 110 STORES & SERVICES • MON.-FRI. 10AM-9PM • SAT. LOAM 8PM • SUN. 11AM-6PM fWVA ET FARKJK MM -49. V*10FMA • Q071544SHOP w. visitsantarosa.com si�tpLU ��Le \I Make the Victorian, Riverfront Town of Petaluma Your Wine Country nn Headquarters. O •32 miles north of the Golden Gate, centrally located to wineries, Sonoma Coast and redwoods FREE Victorian & Historical Walking Tours Li •50 Factory Premium Outlet Stores 1�'i' �y� & Antique Shopping •Cheese FactoryTours & Riverboat Cruises ENCE T�1� G -FREE Fun Family Events Petaluma Visitors Program (707),769-5640 799 Baywood Dr., Lakeville Hwy/ 116 ff Hwy 101 PetalumaOne mile from Historic 7 Downtown Petaluma and the Inn Petaluma Queen Riverboat. ® •75 rooms, Including 5 Suit—90 • 9096 Non -Smoking. • Heated Swimming Ik,d 200 So. McDowell Blvd. • Carrow ,s Restaurant & Petaluma, CA 94954 (707) 763-0994 Lounge On -Site For Reservations Call Toll -Free 800-297-3846 Chanticleer Antiques 7000 6q. FL. collective 6pecializi% in the unique: From formal to plimilive. Monday - Saturday 10 - 5 Sunday 12- 5 145 Petaluma Boulevard North • 707.763-9177 A Bed & Breakfast in a restored 1902 Mansion Located in historic downtown. Seven rooms with private baths and always a gourmet breakfast. ® Call toll-free 888-765-4658 r natural 3 " fiber clothing SHOwetasr (ri OUCEC C -E Dining House, Saloon, Coffee House & Theatre 18,000 sq. ft. of food, fun, games, gifts & live entertainment Food served until 1 am nightly 17-23 Petaluma Blvd. No. • (707) 765-2121 PETALUMA PLAZA Where all your shopping needs coque iogethert Featuring: J.C. Penney, Ross, Sizes Unlimited, Albertsods, Big 5, and other fine stores, services ` and restaurants. jl NORTH MCDOWELL AT EAST WASHINGTON STREET AMPLE FREE PARKING. ITNTAGE W1 iil�-i�A"QUES ' 101 PetaWma Blvd. N. at Wtatrrn Art "I - Irt.�t,tr*W Antiques MALI. -- 3 Flcxw9 to ExpMnre Dally 10-&30 (707) 7659-3097 Featuring fresh, adventuresome food with outrageous desserts. Patio dining on the Petaluma River. Serving award- NS"NOMAW H6t winning handcrahed ales. 50 East Washington St., Petaluma, 94952 • 765-9694 Petaluma Welcomes You! Enjoy one of the many tours offered in this town that's wild for walking. Downtown Historic Walk (10:30 am Sat. &Sun. May - October); Victorian Homes Walking Tour; Film site Tour; Riverwalk; Antique Shops Tour, or take the 23 -Mile Drive. Call (707) 769-0429 for assistance. Ir HOTLINE 707-586-8100 Garden Valley Ranch Award-winning rose ranch. Self -guided and group tours available. Nursery and gift shop. Wedding site. ®Fragrant garden -7 acres. Wed-Sun.10AM-4PM 498 Pepper Rd., Petaluma CA • (707) 795-0919 Chanticleer Antiques 7000 6q. FL. collective 6pecializi% in the unique: From formal to plimilive. Monday - Saturday 10 - 5 Sunday 12- 5 145 Petaluma Boulevard North • 707.763-9177 A Bed & Breakfast in a restored 1902 Mansion Located in historic downtown. Seven rooms with private baths and always a gourmet breakfast. ® Call toll-free 888-765-4658 r natural 3 " fiber clothing SHOwetasr (ri OUCEC C -E Dining House, Saloon, Coffee House & Theatre 18,000 sq. ft. of food, fun, games, gifts & live entertainment Food served until 1 am nightly 17-23 Petaluma Blvd. No. • (707) 765-2121 PETALUMA PLAZA Where all your shopping needs coque iogethert Featuring: J.C. Penney, Ross, Sizes Unlimited, Albertsods, Big 5, and other fine stores, services ` and restaurants. jl NORTH MCDOWELL AT EAST WASHINGTON STREET AMPLE FREE PARKING. ITNTAGE W1 iil�-i�A"QUES ' 101 PetaWma Blvd. N. at Wtatrrn Art "I - Irt.�t,tr*W Antiques MALI. -- 3 Flcxw9 to ExpMnre Dally 10-&30 (707) 7659-3097 Featuring fresh, adventuresome food with outrageous desserts. Patio dining on the Petaluma River. Serving award- NS"NOMAW H6t winning handcrahed ales. 50 East Washington St., Petaluma, 94952 • 765-9694 Petaluma Welcomes You! Enjoy one of the many tours offered in this town that's wild for walking. Downtown Historic Walk (10:30 am Sat. &Sun. May - October); Victorian Homes Walking Tour; Film site Tour; Riverwalk; Antique Shops Tour, or take the 23 -Mile Drive. Call (707) 769-0429 for assistance. Ir HOTLINE 707-586-8100 Sonoma` County Petaluma Located at the headwaters of the river bearing its name, Petaluma offers a variety of attractions to the Sonoma County visitor. Still a water -oriented town, Petaluma has an array of fine shops and restaurants located in proximity to the river and the historic downtown turning basin. There are many explanations of the origin of the name Petaluma. One is that it may be an amalgam of the Pomo Indian peta, or flat and the Spanish loma (hill) in describing some of the terrain the town occupies. This was once a large poultry center, sparked by the local invention and marketing of the first chicken incubator. But although dairy cows have fairly well replaced the hens these days, Petaluma hosts its popular "Butter & Eggs Day" in April, with a parade, music, food and craft exhibits. The dairy industry is a major factor today with Califor- nia Gold and Clover Stornetta Farms the prominent processors. A new municipal Marina is operating, and the Petaluma River is still very much alive with pleasure boat traffic. The river winds for sixteen miles through tidal wetlands alive with wildlife on its way to the upper San Pablo Bay, with the landing at Lakeville Marina the site of a Greek restaurant. A section of General Mariano Vallejo's Adobe located on Old Adobe Road in Petaluma. The residential area has sections of fine old restored Victorian homes. Most of them are intact as Petaluma suffered little damage from the 1906 earthquake. Petaluma was the first city to preserve this architectural heritage with a residential growth manage- ment plan that extended to many old 'iron front" style commercial buildings in the downtown area. The residual "Hometown USA' look is a legacy that has made it an attractive location site for Hol�wood film makers. The Petaluma Adobe located just east of the downtown area was built by General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo in the 1830's and 40's. Its adobe walls were completely encircled by a wide verandah affording the General a panoramic viewing platform from which to survey his vast cattle ranch holdings that at one time comprised 175,000 acres, including the sites of the present day cities of Vallejo and Benicia. Hundreds of Indian laborers lived at the Rancho Petaluma tending crops and caring for livestock. Today the building is restored as State Historic Landmark # 18. Visitors may tour the building, viewing rooms that have been restored with period furnishings $ HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 ver, n _ o A section of General Mariano Vallejo's Adobe located on Old Adobe Road in Petaluma. The residential area has sections of fine old restored Victorian homes. Most of them are intact as Petaluma suffered little damage from the 1906 earthquake. Petaluma was the first city to preserve this architectural heritage with a residential growth manage- ment plan that extended to many old 'iron front" style commercial buildings in the downtown area. The residual "Hometown USA' look is a legacy that has made it an attractive location site for Hol�wood film makers. The Petaluma Adobe located just east of the downtown area was built by General Mariano Guadalupe Vallejo in the 1830's and 40's. Its adobe walls were completely encircled by a wide verandah affording the General a panoramic viewing platform from which to survey his vast cattle ranch holdings that at one time comprised 175,000 acres, including the sites of the present day cities of Vallejo and Benicia. Hundreds of Indian laborers lived at the Rancho Petaluma tending crops and caring for livestock. Today the building is restored as State Historic Landmark # 18. Visitors may tour the building, viewing rooms that have been restored with period furnishings $ HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Experience Premium Outlet Shopping' Discover 50 outlet stores offering the finest designer fashions and name -brand nit•rchandise at 25% to 65% savings every day. Featuring: Ofj''5th - Saks Fifth Avenue Outlet, Joan & David, Reebok, Ann Taylor Factory Store, Mikasa. P1 ]ALUMA VILLAGE I'REMIi1M OUTLETS 50 stores . Petaluma, CA (707)778-9300 Northbound; Hwy. 101 Exit Old Redwood Hwy. Left. Southbound: Hwy. 101 South Exit Petaluma Blvd. North Rigth. •- erns - Quality Inn • Free fill Continental Breakfast • Serving Fresh -Roasted Petaluma Coffee • Free HBO and PrimeStar stations • Outdoor pool, spa and dry sauna • Handicap and Non-smoking rooms • Guest coin laundry • Refrigerator in all rooms • Variety of dining experiences 8-plex movie theater close Lit lodging to the Petal (707) 664-1155..'% lj 4M 5100 ;Montero 11ay, Petaluma. (A i�lullf �f9fll OW 311 The Municipal Marina In Petaluma and eQuipment and outdoor displays that include a blacksmith forge and baker's oven. Each year visitors flock to the Old Adobe Fiesta on the site. Petaluma also plays host to an eclectic group of attractions including the Petaluma Queen and many free tours. Events include the World Wrist Wrestling Championships, Sonoma Marin Fair, an Ugly Dog Contest and many Victorian holiday activities. COW Cotati lies in the old Rancho Cotati land grant and was also a poultry center in early days. The construction of highway 101 contributed to its growth as did the presence of nearby Sonoma State University. Cotati is the site of several cabaret -style entertainment establishments and the University's influence is also felt by the presence of many fine bookstores. In August, the town of Cotati will play host to the Seventh Annual Accordion Festival, which has become a great favorite among aficionados of the squeezebox. Other entertainment includes the Cotati Jazz Festival in June, and the Cotati Indian Summer Festival which features authentic Native American crafts and foods. Resenations qwy: (888) 511= 155 1C HOTLINE 707-586-8100 Healdsburg's Town Square with its classic "Hometown LISA" is ringed witb fine restaurants and shops. When the railroad came through in 1871, the town later evolved into a major canning center, and today this Russian River area still produces and sells a variety of locally grown fruits and vegetables, sold at Farmers' Market on the Plaza, and from locations along the county's main and back roads. The railroad also brought visitors to the area to vacation along the Russian River and dip in the hot springs at local resorts. This marked the beginning of a growing visitor interest in the area by tourists. The town of Healdsburg is arranged around a classic Spanish -style Plaza which is ringed with uniQue restaurants and retail shops. In close proximity are several northern Sonoma County premium wine regions. Healdsburg Memorial Beach on Old Redwood Highway is a favorite spot for swimming, fishing and boating on a scenic stretch of the Russian River. The beach has a bathhouse, lifeguards and a concession stand, with adjacent parking. Nearby Lake Sonoma features swimming, boating, fishing, and horseback riding. The fish hatchery is a spawning ground for steelhead trout, king salmon and silver salmon. The Lake Sonoma and Warm Springs Visitors Center has information on the construction of the 320 ft. earthworks dam which was built to control Russian River flooding and created the 53 miles of jagged shoreline that is Lake Sonoma. The Healdsburg Museum, one block east of the Plaza, showcases a series of exhibits of Healdsburg's pioneer and agricultural heritage. To get a real life "overview", try a panoramic hot air balloon ride over the vineyards from one of the launching pads located at nearby wineries. Area accommodations include Motels, Inns, numerous Bed and Breakfasts, vacation rentals, and campgrounds. 50 PREMIUM WINERIES NEARBY • GIFT BOTTLE OF WINE • FITNESS CENTER, POOL & SPA • COMPLIMENTARY CONTINENTAL BREAKFAST ® NESTLED BET. ALEXANDER & DRY CREEK VALLEYS Am 800.222.5784 DRY CREEK ROAD • MEALDSBURG • CA sonoma.coi,nllodxine/drvcreek/ Tr HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Destination Wine Counti-V T( m- s Balloon Safari Wine Tours Hotel Packages Shuttle Services Customized Video Recreation Activities ChampagrweBrunch 4 Wedding Arrangement 25 Years Experience Destination Management Private flights for Two PUC license # SM B,S 888 -2 -FUN FLY 888-238-6359 Healdsburg Chamber of Commerce 217 Healdsburg Ave. Healdsburg, CA 95448 tel: 707-433-6935 800-648-9922 (in CA) www.hbg.sonoma.net City of Healdsburg P.O. Box 578 401 Grove St. Healdsburg, CA 95448 tel: 707-431-3301 www.hbg.sonoma.net Windsor Chamber of Commerce 8499 Old Redwood Hwy., Suite 202 Windsor, CA 95492 tel: 707-838-7285 fax: 707-838-2778 I f .yR t_— . s• ttbronu unor Wine country elegance is experienced in this majestic victorian mansion. 21 luxurious rooms: (18 with fireplaces) in four buildings on 8 acres'; of wooded and manicured grounds. Internationally acclaimed restauran "The equal of any in San Francisco," clad the S.E Chronicle. Our gold medal wine list compliments the superb dinners served nightly by candlelight. 800-258-4003 1001 Westside Road • Healdsburg, California 95448 .T Small Town Charm & Elegance ��tiRN * STEAKS * SEAFOOD eO CHICKEN * RIBS * PASTA #9 MrrcHEl1 LANE HEALDSBURG, CA 95448 707-433-6362 BED & BREAKFAST INNS Berg erie............................................. (888) 290-1900 5325 Eastside Rd., Private cottages in forest. $95-135 Calderwood ...................................... (800) 600-5444 25 W. Grant St. Victorian. 6 rms. Gourmet breakfast. $135-185 Camellia Inn ..................................... (800) 727-8182 211 North St. 1869 Victorian. 9 rms www.camelliainn.com $75-145 Frampton House .............................. (707) 433-5084 489 Powell Ave., Cozy Victorian, 3 rms, sauna. $70-90 Grape Leaf Inn ................................. (707) 433-8140 539 Johnson St., Spas for 2, www.grapeleafinn.com $90-150 Haydon St. Inn ................................. (800) 528-3703 321 Haydon St., 1912 Victorian, 8 rms all pvt baths, spas, quiet $95-165 Healdsburg Inn on the Plaza ........ (800) 431-8663 110 Matheson St. 10 rms, historic plaza, art gallery, midwk discount $165-225 Honor Mansion ................................ (800) 554-4667 14891 Grove St, Spacious Victorian, 6 rms, pool $120-220 Hope -Merrill House ..................... (800) 8254BED 21253 Geyserville Ave, 12 rms, garden, pool $195-140 Raford House ................................... (800) 887-9503 10630 Wohler Rd. 1880 Victorian above vineyards $90-145 Villa Messina ................................... (707) 433-6655 316 Burgundy Rd., 5 rms, Landmark, views, VCR/TV $140-230 JANUARY Winter Wineland MARCH Barrel Tasting, Russian River Wine Road APRIL Walking tour of Historic Homes Passport to Dry Creek MAY Art on the Move Healdsburg Country Fair and Twilight Parade Memorial Day Weekend AntiQue Fair JUNE THRU AUGUST Summer Concert Series JULY Old Fashioned Fourth of luly Fireworks Display Annual Fourth of luly Weekend AntiQue Fair Wine Country Brew'r HAND-CRAFTED ALES FROM THE HEART OF JRR SONOMA COUNTY'S WINE COUNTRY BEAR REPUBLIC 433 -BEER 345 HEALDSBURG AVE. - DOWNTOWN HEAT Healdsburg Classics 214 & 226 Healdsburg Ave. Antiques Gallery • Public Auctions ArAitectural • Victorian • Collectibles Open 7 days 10-5 • (707) 433-4315 y°- Bargcili78t DAILY 6E s 44MMStmet 10-5 AIMQUOS ...rF. ..� 50 [lis $ a 20,0 Sq. Ft WLL The BIG BLUE BUILDINGR�-�``�' Healdsburg Museum Open House Healdsburg Harvest Century Bicycle Tour AUGUST Healdsburg Guitar Festival Healdsburg AntiQues Fair OCTOBER Beer & Sausage Tasting NOVEMBER Tree Lighting & Open House DECEMBER Healdsburg Museum Holiday Open House For more information on the events listed above, or to find out about other events. please call the Healdsburg Chamber of Commerce at (707) 433-6935 or (800) 648-9922. www.hbg.sonoma.net 77 HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 For Sonoma County vintners today, life is good. Premium wine's popularity is at an all time high, we are producing the finest wines in our history, and Sonoma County continues to gain recognition as a world-class wine region. Only when I think back to my childhood do I realize how far the wine industry and Sonoma County have come. The town of Sonoma in a farming community: c and little appreciated e those of us who lived In a way it reflected the c atter of Sonoma Coui agriculture was Sonom County's primary busi- ness but vineyards shared the spot 16light with dairy farms, apple and prune orchards, and cattle ranches. Except at a few resorts along the Russian River near Guerneville, overnight visitors were rare Sonoma County wz home to perhaps wineries back then, mos which produced generi and whites. Sebastiani ' was among the first to of varietal wines alongside a pioneers like Hanzell, Buena Vista Pedroncelli. The Sea Stewarts New wineries blossomed through- out the county: the total now approaches 150, of which more than 90 welcome visitors for wine tasting. The wine industry changes in turn brought new 1 tourism. Sonoma County became more than a pretty rural place: it became "wine country", and visitors came to see our wineries, taste our wines and enjoy our region's remarkable beauty. >, services developed for rs: good lodging, fine ts, specialty shops and tional options. Fortunately, iew tourism encompassed )f Sonoma County, mod- tting its impact on any one kation and enabling us xals to enjoy some of the amenities it created right in our own home towns. and Our tasting room, then located on the Sonoma Plaza, was something of a curiosity, one of perhaps six tasting rooms in the entire count' That was Sonoma County 30years ago. Since then, Sonoma County has undergone a revolution of sorts with the wine industry in the forefront of the changes. Vineyard acreage more than tripled, and wine grapes became the county's most important agricultural crop. Premium varietal wines grew in importance, eventually dominating production. I expect that Sonoma County's wine industry will continue to inspire Sonoma County tourism well into the future. With each vintage, wineries add to the County's wine eputation and name :cognition while providing idreds of compelling is to visit. Will also continue to be moma County wineries, ,.,,,,,,,b . ,neet potential customers— "up close and personal and build lasting relationships. Surprisingly, for the distance Sonoma County has come in the past 30 years, its magic remains as strong today as in my childhood memories. For the most part, it's still a place of great beauty and easy-going ambiance. To be sure, there are lots of new businesses, and many of the old buildings have been spruced up, yet the small town spirit which made Sonoma (both town and county) such great places to grow up, is still here to enjoy. Don Sebastiani, Chairman of the Board, CEO of Sebastiani Sonoma Cask Cedars, is a third generation resident of Sonoma Valley. Ir HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Sonomo ROa °•per s 'I @wort's PointR� d p Dry Creek Valley 1 d lCazadero • Dun Guenn UN Jenne Mi • Monte A �J �•`� Forestvil e • C� 116 Groton • Occi 1 • Salm.._ Alexander Valley Mark West Sp Knights Valley CotaW ­ I . Alexander Valley Fruit & Trading Co. 2. Clos du Bois 3. Pedroncelli Winery 4. Trentadue Winery 5. Alexander Valley Vineyards 6. Dry Creek Vineyard 7. Ferrari-Carano Vineyard & Winery 8. Hanna Winery (2 locations) 9. Kendall -Jackson 10. Kendall -Jackson California Coast Wine Center 1 1. Martinelli Winery 12. Michel -Schlumberger 13. Pezzi King Vineyard 14. Quivira Vineyards 15. Simi Winery 16. Arrowood Vineyards & Winery d „ r" • Boyes Hot prings Sonoma uma (12 A 116 101 I, 37 San Pablo Bay 17. Bartholomew Park Winery 18. Benziger Family Winery 19. Buena Vista Winery 20. Cline Cellars 21. Glen Ellen Winery Tasting Room 22. Gloria Ferrer Champagne Caves 23. Kenwood Vineyards 24. Kunde Estate Winery 25. Landmark Vineyards 26. Sebastiani Sonoma Cask Cellars 27. Viansa Winery & Italian Marketplace 28. Adler Fels Winery 29. De Loach Vineyards 30. Korbel Champagne Cellars 31. Matanzas Creek Winery Tr HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Wineries GE }".11:RVILLE/CLOVF.RDALE Alexander Valley Fruit & Trading Co. 5110 Highway 128 Geyserville, CA 95441 707-433-1944 Clos du Bois 19410 Geyserville Ave. Geyserville, CA 95441 707-857-3100/800-222-3189 Pedroncelli Winery 1220 Canyon Rd. Geyserville, CA 95441 707-857-3531/800-836-3894 Trentadue Winery 19170 Geyserville Ave. Geyserville, CA 95441 707-433-3104/800-349-4637 HF.ALDSBURGIWINDSOR Alexander Valley Vineyards 8644 Highway 128 Healdsburg, CA 95448 707-433-7209/800-349-4637 Dry Creek Vineyard 3770 Lambert Bridge Rd. Healdsburg, CA 95448 707-433-1000/800-864-9463 Ferrari-Carano Vineyard & Winery 8761 Dry Creek Rd. Healdsburg, CA 95448 707-433-6700 TOURS TASTING SALES Wine/food tasting. Gift baskets. Concert NO Yes Yes series. Picnic area, view. Facility for special events. MC, V, AE. loam to Spm daily (except major holidays). Alexander Valley No Yes Yes Sample award winning wines while enjoying the sweeping panoramic view of hills and vineyards that surround us. Tasting loam to 4:30pm daily. Alexander Valley NO Yes Yes Picnic area & bocce court available. Complimentary tasting of fine wines. Art shows by local artists. loam to 5 p daily. Dry Creek Valley Yes Yes Yes Wine tasting, wedding and picnic facilities, country store. Zin, Petite Sirah, Merlot Pbrt, Sangiovese, Carignane, Merlot. I lam to 4:30pm daily. Alexander Valley Appt Yes Yes Complimentary tasting of 8 varieties. Picnic area, views & camper parking. Gift shop, retail sales, tours by appt. l Oam to Spm (except major holidays). Alexander Valley No Yes Yes Estab. in 1972 by David Stare. Retail sales, gifts, picnic grounds. Annual Open House— ^ st weekend in June. 10:30am to 4:30pm (except major holidays) Dry Creek Valley Appt Yes Yes Visitors will discover a magnificent barrel cellar, stunning gardens, critically acclaimed wines and unique gifts. Open daily from I oam to 5pm. Dry Creek Valley LA FIU I LtwE. / V/ -JOD-O I VV To URS I TASTINGI SALES Hanna Winery No Yes Yes Visit Hanna Winery's new hospitality 9280 Highway 128 center in Alexander Valley. Spectacular Healdsburg, CA 95448 vineyard views, complimentary tasting 707-431-4310/800-854-3987 daily from loam to 4pm. Alexander Valley Kendall -Jackson No Yes Yes Taste wines from California's premier wine 337 Healdsburg Ave. growing regions. Wine sales and wine Healdsburg, CA 95448 accessories. Something for everyone. 707-433-7102 loam to 4:30pm. Alexander Valley Kendall -Jackson California Coast Wine Center Yes Yes Yes Tasting daily loam to 5pm. Self guided 5007 Fulton Rd. tour through demonstration vineyard. Fulton, CA 95439 Picnic area. 707-571-7500 Martinelli Winery Yes Yes Yes Tasting room in our historic Hop Barn. 3360 River Rd. Estate wines, local food products, unique Windsor, CA 95492 gift shop, picnic area, art gallery. 707-525-0570 loam to 5pm. Russian River Michel -Schlumberger Appt Yes Yes Tours daily by appointment at 4155 Wine Creek Rd. l lam & 2pm. Healdsburg, CA 95448 Dry Creek Valley 707-433-7427 Pezzi King Vineyard Appt Yes Yes The newest `destination winery in Sonoma 3805 Lambert Bridge Rd. County. Visit our beautiful tasting room Healdsburg, CA 95448 & picnic gardens. Enjoy one of the most 707-431-9388, FAX 431-9389 scenic views of the Dry Creek Valley Quivira Vineyards Appt Yes Yes Picnic grounds under the olive trees. 4900 West Dry Creek Rd. Sauvignon Blanc, Zin, Cabernet, Merlot, Healdsburg, CA 95448 Dry Creek Cuvee (Rhone blend). loam 707-431-8333/800-292-8339 to 4:30pm. Dry Creek Valley Simi Winery Yes Yes Yes Historic Simi is open daily l Oam to 16275 Healdsburg Ave. 4:30pm. Complimentary tasting & Healdsburg, CA 95448 tours. World class wine, picnic area, 707-433-6981 1 1 1 1 gifts. Alexander Valley Visit The First Lady Of Sonoma. ;. " Come taste our award-winning sparkling wines and enjoy the view from our vista terrace. Tours • Tastings • Banquets and Weddings GLORIA FERRER CHAMPAGNE CAVES P.O. Box 1427, 23555 Cameros Hwy (121), Sonoma, CA 95476 o* Hours: 10:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m. daily (tours offered daily) v (707) 996-7256 1,1(ui Fmix....e S...o C...., Ste...— CA. Glod, F- 6 a ..qi.4 J tr.d......L. $ HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 So.voAWKENwooDIGLEN ELLEN TOURS TASTINC SALES Arrowood Vineyards & Winery Appt Yes Yes Hand-crafted Sonoma County wines. 14347 Sonoma Hwy. Visitors welcome! Tours available by Glen Ellen, CA 95442 appointment. loam to 4:30pm. 707-938-5170 Sonoma Valley Bartholomew Park Winery Appt Yes Yes Historic winery building and museum 1000 Vineyard Ln. on 400 acres of vineyards. Picnic grounds Sonoma, CA 95476 and hiking trails. Private functions. 707-938-5170 Complimentary tasting. Sonoma Valley Benziger Family Winery Yes Yes Yes Wine shop, interactive tram tour. 1883 London Ranch Rd. Picnics, art gallery, gifts. Glen Ellen, CA 95442 loam to 4:30pm. Sonoma Mountain 707-935-4046 Buena Vista Winery Yes Yes Yes CNs Oldest Premium Winery -1857. 18000 Old Winery Rd. Tastings, picnics, gallery/gifts daily. Sonoma, CA 95476 Group tours. 10:30am to 4:30pm; 10:30am 707-938-1266 to Spm July -Sept. Sonoma Valley Cline Cellars Appt Yes Yes Visit Historic Grounds. Wine tasting in 24737 Arnold Dr. an 1850's farmhouse. Picnic grounds Sonoma, CA 95476 available. l Oam to 6pm. 707-935-4310 Sonoma Cameros Glen Ellen Winery Tasting Room Yes Yes Yes Housed in a building where wines were 14301 Arnold Dr.. fust made over a century ago, Glen Ellen Glen Ellen, CA 95442 Winery Tasting Room and History Center 707-939-6277 is open loam to Spm daily. Sonoma Valley Gloria Ferrer Champagne Caves Yes Yes Yes A touch of Spain in the Sonoma 23555 Highway 121 Cameros. Tour man-made caves l lam Sonoma, CA 95476 to 4pm. Enjoy our sparkling wines. 707-996-7256 10:30am to 5:30pm Sonoma Cameros Kenwood Vineyards Appt Yes Yes Kenwood Vineyards produces a full line 9592 Sonoma Hwy. of award-winning wines. Visit our tasting Kenwood, CA 95452 room. Tours by appointment. Open daily 707-833-5891 loam to 4:30 pm. Sonoma Valley Kunde Estate Winery Yes Yes Yes Beautiful shaded picnic area, cave tours 10 15 5 Sonoma Hwy. available on weekends. Scenic Sonoma Kenwood, CA 95452 Valley at its best. l lam to 5pm. 707-833-5501 Sonoma Valley 2 0 Landmark Vineyards Appt Yes Yes Tasting room and unique gift shop, "10 1 Adobe Canyon Rd. courtyard fountain, pondside picnic area, Kenwood, CA 95452 weddings, corporate & private events. 707-833-0053 loam to 4:30pm. Sonoma Valley Sebastiani Sonoma Cask Cellars Yes Yes Yes Guided tours daily 10:30am to 4pm. 389 Fourth St. East Tastings, gift shop and picnic area. Sonoma, CA 95476 loam to 5pm. Sonoma Valley 707-938-5532/800-888-5532 VINTNERS INN WI1 H rN 71SH h CO RESTAURA f, "A Special Place in the Sonoma Wine Country" • European -style hotel nestled in a 45 -acre vineyard • 44 rooms with optional fireplace, patio or balcony • Complimentary breakfast • Sundeck and spa • Conference facilities • Golf and tennis nearby • Full concierge service available • Nationally acclaimed John Ash Co. Restaurant 800 421-2584 ��---� 707) 575-7350 135(► Barnes Rd., Santa Rosa, CA 95403 Tr HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 TOURS I TASTINGI SALES Viansa Winery & Old world Italian -style hilltop winery. Italian Marketplace Yes Yes Yes Private group or self -guided tours. 25200 Highway 121 Gourmet deli & seasonal Bar-B-Que. Sonoma, CA 95476 loam to 5pm. Sonoma Carneros 707-935-4700 SANTA ROSAIRUSSIAN RIVER Adler Fels Winery Appt Appt Appt Adler Fels Winery produces wines 5325 Corrick Ln. that offer intense varietal character Santa Rosa, CA 95409 & are among the most awarded 707-539-3123 FAX 707-539-3128 in the world. Russian River De Loaeh Vineyards Yes Yes Yes We welcome visitors to taste our award - 1791 Olivet Rd. winning wines including Chard, Zin Santa Rosa, CA 95401 and Cab Sauv loam to 4:30pm. 707-526-9111 Russian River Valley Ernest & Julio Gallo Winery No No No The Gallo Family produces limited (Headquarter Office) quantities of Estate Bottled wines from 8 P O Box 1130 benchland vineyards in the Sonoma Modesto, CA 95353 Coast and Dry Creek, Russian River, 209-579-8659 & Alexander Valleys Hanna Winery Yes Yes Yes Courtyard, vineyard views, beautiful 5353 Occidental Rd. tasting room. Enjoy distinctive wines. Santa Rosa, CA 95401 Minutes from Santa Rosa. Open daily 707-575-3371 loam to 4pm. Russian River Korbel Champagne Cellars Yes Yes Yes Picnic area, gift shop, deli, RV parking, 13250 River Rd. gardens. Tours all year: May -Sept loam Guerneville, CA 95446 to 3:45; Oct -Apr loam to 3. Special 707-887-2294 groups by appt. Russian River Matanzas Creek Winery Yes Yes Yes Come to taste our outstanding wines. 6097 Bennett Valley Rd. Stay and enjoy our award winning landscape. Santa Rosa, CA 95404 Stroll through our lavender fields. l Oam 707-528-6464 to 4:30pm daily; Sonoma Valley XPERIENCE A GRACIOUS TRADITION... n . -- 1@QIRIA111A7 � ., ��vY nPA �Gl�,yoy f �4 , Gryurvme ,ITI\ f .0 P11110 per_.. n �N",� �,�y,�-8761 Dry Cm k Road �ealdebaB) 1 H.A&burg, CA Saye porn N r/07) 433.6700 open daily from 10:00 - 5:00 - Tours by appointment. Highway 101 to Dry Creek Road. Go west for nine miles. 8761 Dry Creek Road, Healdsburg, CA 95448 Phone (707) 433-6700 Visitors to the Wine Shop atViUa Fiore will discover Ferrari�arano's critically acclaimed wines including limited production and library collections only available -�, � ,� � at the winery. An extensive selection of gifts, clothing and wine related treasures make Villa Fiore one of the wine country's Premier shopping spots Nestled at the north end of the pictur- esque Dry Creek Valley, this magical wine country site is highlighted by five acres of exquisitely landscaped ` gardens, an extraordinary underground barrel cellar and a gracious and know- ledgeable Ir HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 tasting room staff. Ir HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 c Sonoma t;iooerame Nestled in the Northernmost area of Alexander Valley, the town of Cloverdale is rich in history and offers the traveler all of 0 2 2)jz�LZ "41 7 V i the conveniences of a large city with the charm of a small town. Year- round activities include wine tasting, steelhead fishing, camping, hiking, and sightseeing. Bass fishing is also available in nearby Lake Sonoma. Visitors may stay in one of the B & B's or many campgrounds in the area. Cloverdale's new town plaza, and Wine and Visitors Center are worth exploring as well as the natural splendor of the surrounding hills and wineries. GeyseroMe This area also is fruit and wine country but takes its name from the nearby hot springs and geysers. Originally settled as a stage stop for visitors exploring the Geyser region and areas north, today Geyserville is the turn off for the Devil's Canyon Geysers geothermal project, and gateway to Alexander Valley wineries. ,�,� A,1 , Aii ?A:. R JE - if;, Cloverdale: Where the Vineyards Meet the Redwoods Auto Dealers/Service Restaurants 1) Esposti Jeep & Eagle 15) Blvd Deli 2) Southard's Tire & Auto Center 16) Canton Restaurant Bed & Breakfasts 17) Hamburger Ranch 3) Abrams House Inn 18) Hi-Fi Drive In 19) Owl Cafe 4) Shelford House 5) Vintage Towers Wineries Banks 20) Wattle Creek Winery 6) American Savings Miscellaneous 7) Exchange Bank 21) Cloverdale Citrus Fair 8) WestAmerica Bank 22) Cloverdale Pharmacy Camping 23) Furber Ranch Plaza 9) Wine Country Koa Kampground 24) Golf Course (Spring '98) 10) Naco West 25) Cloverdale Depot Gas/Convenience Stores 26) The Video Store 1 1) Fast & Easy Mart # 1 27) Ace Hardware 12) Fast & Easy Mart #2 28) Ed Bier D.V.M. 29) Cloverdale Airport & Sky Diving Center Insurance Services 13) Moraine Associates 30) Cloverdale Chamber of Commerce/Wine Real Estate and Visitor Center 10 Designates Municipal Services Locations 14) Domenichelli Real Estate Vineyard & Country Property Special Thanks to Bruce Reuse? -.0 ��QO&, � p LA K FE SONOMA Ii4s 1 �1(� Nr7 ✓ ItIVNRwT EO 6fUvnic corc�u9sN y. Sonoma Russian River The Russian River region offers a broad I t f f" I f' County Russian River Region operations and soon railroads pushed into the redwood forest areas to help bring the lumber to market. When the lumbering operations waned, the trains switched to hauling passengers from the Bay Area up to the River and many of these holiday seekers established second homes along the Russian River in the open spaces created by the lumbering. Today the Russian River area offers a variety of accommodations from vacation rentals to the Bed and Breakfast experience. Fa a e o recrea iona op ions. Route 1 16, River Road, plays tag with the river from just • west of highway 101 to the coast. The river itself is a UNSPOILED BEACHES` _, 24/ magnet for swimming, FAMOUS SCENIC RIVER boating, fishing and WORLD CLASS WINERIES canoe trips. Its banks skirt rustic towns, giant redwoods, campgrounds, RV parks and beaches from the time it winds its way from the headwaters in the Mayacamas Mountain Range until it meets the Pacific Ocean at Jenner. Even novices can canoe or kayak almost the entire length of the River, with a good chance of viewing otter, osprey or herons along the way, and anglers may try their luck in hooking steelhead, bluegill, silver salmon or black bass. This area was originally the site of lumbering The Russian River Jazz Festival, held each June, presents top jazz artists performing in a friendly, informal atmosphere. Other festivals and fairs highlight crafts, antioque cars, chamber music, and crab feeds. Many redwood areas may be explored by foot or horseback. Some of the old growth trees in the 7S2 acre Armstrong Redwoods State Preserve are 1400 years old, and reach a height of 310 feet. This group of redwoods was saved by Civil War veteran James Armstrong, with help in later preservation efforts from botanist Luther Burbank. Two miles north of Armstrong Redwood Preserve is the Austin Creek Recreational area with 4200 acres of hiking trails and campsites. Several wineries make up the Russian River Wine Road and many offer Ir HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 tasting. Most of the wineries are near the river with several strung out along winding, scenic Westside Road between Healdsburg and Guerneville. Each year the Russian River Wine Road Festival is held in May. Korbel Winery on River Road dates from the 19th century and has an antique rose garden open to visitors. There is also a network of small farms and orchards that grow and offer fresh farm produce and food products for sale. There is enough diversity of attractions in and around the Russian River to match the inclination or level of strenuous activity of any and all of its visitors. SONOMA COUNTY MOTHER NATURE IS ALIVE & FLOURISHING YOUR MAP TO 100 FAMi1 ARbAs. IN SONOMA COUNTY At the northern edge of the San Francisco Bay, and an hour's drive from the Golden Gate Bridge, Sonoma County is home to an enormous assortment of family farms, specialty growers and wineries that are open to the touring public. The bounty includes: Tangy Gravenstein apples, U -pick strawberries, world class cheeses, breads, olive oils and flavored vinegars. Also, wines that have received more awards than any other California winegrowing region, hand-crafted beers, jams and preserves, award winning mustards, salsas, ciders, candles, exotic birds, premium wool comforters, baby goats, llamas, emus, pigs, holiday trees and wreaths, native plants, pastoral farms and ranches. Look for the Sonoma County Farm Trails sign at each member farm. Pick up the free Farm Trails map at farm stands, hotels, chambers of commerce and visitors' centers. Tour ... taste...and explorell Tr HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 FBEESTO"t STORE n4 Sonoma County Occidental Forestville Freestone Sebastopol SebaSjopol There were originally five California towns named Sebastopol. Those in Tulare, Nevada and Sacramento counties no longer exist and the one in Napa county was renamed Yountville. The one remaining, in Sonoma County, is known as the "Gravenstein apple capitol of the World," and is also surrounded by premium vineyards. Its annual Apple Blossom Festival is held in April when trees ^are in the height of their bloom. 2 6>Other fresh produce is readily available at the many "Farm Trails" locations throughout the area. Sebastopol also has a performing arts theater and is an antiQue hunter's mecca with its many shops in which one may browse among collectibles. Golf, tennis and horseback riding are near, as well as hiking, biking and other outdoor sports activities. Forestville The short stretch of road up the Gravenstein Highway ( 1 16) to Forestville is dotted with examples of the Farm Trails experience, with tastings of apples, wine grapes, fruits, jams and jellies. Forestville is the site of the Music in the Park event where nationally known bands gather to play. Occidental A Quick double back and a right at Graton takesyou west to the village of Occidental. This was originally the site of logging camps, and logs and other local products were shipped out of Occidental by rail. As the redwood forests began to become logged Historic country out and the trains store in Freestone switched to passenger hauling, San Franciscans escaping the chill of their summer fogs discovered Occidental and began building vacation homes and cabins in the area. These summer homes were built in Occiden- tal and just north at Camp Meeker, which still retains some of the San Francisco street names established by the early developers. During the heyday of lumbering, the families of immigrant Italian woodcutters opened boardinghouses and began serving basic �%,holesome food for the hungry lumberjacks. Today the legacy of multi -coursed, hearty Italian meals remains and is an experience not to be missed. Occidental is also the setting for several art and craft fairs and music festivals. The local Redwood Arts Council presents a schedule of world- renowned artists of folk, classical and jazz and the Community Choir also performs in concert throughout theyear. Freestone lust south of Occidental is Freestone, named for the once easily sourced and free sand- stone from a nearby Quarry. The perfectly preserved Freestone Hotel still stands along with a well stocked country store, a rare plant nursery, antiQue shops, and a Japanese enzyme bath and massage center. Tr HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Sebastopol Area Chamber of Commerce Invites You To Journey to Sebastopol... Crossroaa'tthe Russian River Valley and the Sonoma Coast Visitor Information Call 707-823-3032 rf,e On rhe Sefwstnpal Placa 1381feeksWuy BeSebastopol, CA 95472 a .�= Bed..d Breakfast Y° � ♦1r � cattery � 7/17.829.5541 ti< - 3106 Flicks Rd. (at Craton Rd.) Wore info - www.advergraphics.com/-Iudyt/millenniumarts.html 5"Os /S Enzyme Bath & Massage Freestone 707-823-8231 www.osmosis.com Imagine total rejuvenation in a serene Japanese qarden SEBASTOPOL ANTIQUE MALA - 93 26,000 square feet of quality antiques & collectibles. Cafe offering delicious gourmet cuisine 755 Petaluma Ave. (Hwy. 116) Sebastopol, CA 95472 • (707) 823-1936 Open Daily from 10 am to 6 pm iK-Ridenhour �rj -t ' Ranch House I tin Bed & Breakfast A COUNTRY INN JN THE RUSSIAN RIVER c7PEN ALL YEAR (Adjacent to Korbel Winery) (707) 887-1033 -�Best Dinner Tues.—Sun. O..t'n96 Sunday Brunch MAIOun Y Fish are Jumpin' Seafood is plentiful in Sonoma County with commercial fishing boats and sport charters sailing out daily from Bodega Bay and anglers trying their luck in the Russian River and other streams. Weather permitting, and in season, the Bodega Bay Fleet brings the following varieties in varying Quantity: Pacific Snapper, Wild King Salmon, Rock Cod, Dungeness Crab, California and Northern Halibut, Petrale, Swordfish, Thresher Shark, and Albacore. The most popular Salmon and Crab catches are conveniently distributed throughout theyear with crab season running from October to Mid -May and King Salmon being taken from May to October. The largest fish populations in the Russian River are Coho Salmon and Steelhead, in addition to some warm water fish such as Blue Gill, Black Bass and American Shad. 7r HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Bed Breakfast Reservation services Vinta Better B & B Bookings PO. Box 2888, Santa Rosa 800-510-2888, 888-433-6281 A unique reservation service that books accommodations for B & B's, vacation rentals, etc., in Northern California and beyond. Travel N' Style 707-823-0284 voice/fax B & B bookings. Let us make complete arrangements for your corporate seminars, incentives, and wine country tours. Wine Country Inns P.O. Box 51, Geyserville, CA 95441,707-433-4667 12 professional Bed & Breakfast Inns located throughout Sonoma County's premium wine country. For brochure & availability, call 800- winecountry, or visit us on the Internet at www.winecountryinns.com Cloverdale/Geyserville Abrams House Inn 314 N Main St., Cloverdale, CA 95425, 707-894-2412, 800- 764-41NN, Fax 894-4476. Restored 1870 Victorian, 4 guest rooms, decadent breakfast, deck, garden, gazebo, hot tub. From $60-12S. Campbell Ranch Inn 147S Canyon Rd., Geyserville, CA 9SS41 707-857-3476, 800-959-3878 Thirty-five acre country estate, spectacular view, 5 rooms, private baths, king beds, balconies, tennis, pool, spa, bikes, full breakfast. Geyserville Inn 21714 Geyserville Ave. Geyserville, CA 95541 707-857-4343, Fax 707-526-5652 New Inn, easy access, wine country setting with pool & fireplaces. Adiacent deli & picnic grounds. Hope Merrill House/Hope Bosworth House 21253 Geyserville Ave. Geyserville, CA 95441 707-857-3356, 800-825-4BED Twelve rooms, private baths; whirl- pool tubs & fireplaces. Beautiful gardens, gazebo, pool. Full breakfast. The Shelford House 29955 River Rd., Cloverdale, CA 95425 707-894-59S6, 800-833-6479 A homey country inn overlooking the vineyards, providing a quiet restful overnight for travelers in the Sonoma County Wine Country. From $125. ge Towers Inn 302 N. Main St.. Cloverdale. CA 95425,707-894-4535.888-886-9377 1901 Queen Anne Victorian. Elegantly decorated with fine antiques, 8 charming rooms, parlor with piano, library. Veranda, gazebo, rose garden. Full breakfast. www.vintagetowers.com Healdsburg/Windsor Belle de Jour Inn 16276 Healdsburg Ave. Healdsburg, CA 95448 707-431-9777 5 suites in cottages & carriage house, tubs for two, fireplaces, full breakfast at main house. Near win- eries. Rates from $135. MC, V AE. Camellia Inn 2 11 North St. Healdsburg, CA 95448 707-433-8182,800-727-8182 Nine rooms, elegant Victorian, all private baths, gas fireplaces, whirlpool tubs. Full breakfast. Walk to wineries, shops, pool. $75- $145. www.camelliainn.com Country Meadow Inn 11360 Old Redwood Hwy. Windsor, CA 95492 707-431-1276, 800-238-1728 Elegant 1890 Victorian farmhouse. 5 rms, pvt baths, whirlpool tub, pool, tennis. Full breakfast. The Farmhouse Inn & Restaurant 7871 River Rd. Forestville CA 95436 707-887-3300, 800-464-6642 Award winning country inn, pool, gardens, in -room fireplaces, spa tubs, saunas, TV/VCRs. V/MC/AE. Grape Leaf Inn S39 Johnson St., Healdsburg, CA 9S448, 707-433-8140 Queen Anne Victorian home. Beau- tifully restored, 7 rooms, all private baths. Full breakfast, fine wines served eves. Whirlpool/tub/ showers for 2. Rates $90 & up. www.grapeleafinn.com Haydon Street Inn 321 Haydon St., Healdsburg, CA 95448, 707-433-5228 Quiet neighborhood, walking distance to historic Plaza, wineries nearby. Beautiful Victorian home & cottage, antiques, private baths - 2 double whirlpool tubs, memo- rable breakfast. Rates $95-165. Healdsburg Country Gardens 670 Bailhache Ave. Healdsburg, CA 95448 707-431-8630 Lovely home & cottage on 15 acre farm. Vineyard views, fireplace, deck, hot tub, gardens. Vacations, weddings & receptions. From $90. Healdsburg Inn On The Plaza 110 Matheson Healdsburg. CA 95448 707-433-6991,800-431-8663 Downtown Hotel/Art Gallery/Gi Shop. Full breakfast, fireplaces. AC antiques. Weekends $ IS 5-2 10 Discounts midweek & winter. Z� The Honor Mansion 14891 Grove St. Healdsburg, CA 95448 707-433-4277,800-554-4667 1883 Victorian completely restored. Five beautiful rooms, all with private baths. Pool, koi pond, decks, gardens. Madrona Manor 1001 Westside Rd. Healdsburg, CA 95448 800-258-4003.707-433-4231 Romantic 1881 Victorian mansion surrounded by wineries & vineyards. 21 rooms, business meetings, retreats. Pbol. Worid-class restaurant. Raford House Bed & Breakfast Inn 10630 Wohler Rd. ` Healdsburg, CA 95448 800-887-9503,, 1880's country Victorian w/ vineyard & rose gardens. Antique-'_, 1 filled rooms, fireplaces, evenin ` rn wine & cheese. Great views; gr breakfasts. $90-145. Twin Towers River Ranch 615 Bailhache Ave. Healdsburg, CA 95448 707-433-4443 �. 1863 Victorian Home w/ two bed- rooms. Oak Tree House sleeps 6 on the river. Charming redwood tree house, close to river, sleeps 10. Russian River Applewood Inn & Restaurant 13555 Hwy. 116 near Guerneville 707-869-9093"""' A stylish hillside escape with pool, spa, handsome decor and stunning, though casual candlelit dining. Irl: Sumptuous and romantic. Cazanoma Lodge 1000 Kidd Creek Rd. Cazadero, CA 95421 707-632-5255 Old world lodge on 147 acres. ,^ Suites & cabins $65-125 11 restaurant, hiking trails, & Kussiam:'+^ River. Close to ocean. �1, ' Creekside Inn & Resort 16180 Neeley Rd. Guerneville, CA 95446 707-869-3623, 800-776-658 Just another charming country in with tory cottages, a pleasant pool, and relaxed, delightful guest$: ,"� $60-150/night. j 17 HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Fern Grove Inn 16650 River Rd. Guernewood Park, CA 95446 800-347-9083,707-869-9083 Fireplace cottage suites. TVNCR, wet bar, pool, gardens, Wine Country breakfast. Meetings/retreats. Rates $89-199 Dbl. Fountain Bleu Estates 10017 Cherry Ridge Rd. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707-823-7755 An elegant country estate, 10 acres of privacy, 4 beautiful guestrooms, luxurious master suite, weddings and special events for 200. The Gravenstein Inn 3160 Hicks Rd. Sebastopol, CA 95472 707-829-0493, Fax 707-824-9382 Elegantly restored 1872 farmhouse near wineries, river & redwoods, own apple orchard. Full breakfast, pool. Rooms start at $8S. MCN/AE. Ridenhour Ranch House Inn 12850 River Rd. Guerneville, CA 95446 707-887-1033, 888-877-4466 1906 farmhouse near Korbel Cellars, hot tub, full bkfst, dinner available. Walking distance to river. Rooms start at $95. MCN/AE. Sweet Reunion 16124 Drake, Guerneville, CA 95446 707-869-9769,800-310-0804 Charming cottages nestled in red- woods. Relaxing, eco -friendly environment. Affordable comforts, gourmet basket in cottage, river access, families welcome. Sonoma Coast Fort Ross Lodge 20705 Coast Hwy I, Jenncr, CA 95450 707-847-3333,800-968-4537 Cozy rooms, ocean views, fire- places, in -room hot tubs & saunas, much more. 22 rooms, $78-200, mid -week rates avail. Gualala Coanify Inn 47955 Center St. at Hwy. I t%Gualala, CA 95445 `707-884-4343, 800-S64-4466 "t* .=Escape to the beautiful Mendocino liSt. Ocean & river views, private ths, some fireplaces & spas. AAA "rated. country inn@gualala.com The Inn At Occidental 3657 Church St., Occidei* 1, CA 95465 707-874-1047, 800-522-6324 Elegant Inn near coast. Ultimate experience For rejuvenating mind od body. 8 bedrooms, private i . baths, jacuzzi spa, hot tub and tl rplaces. Full breakfast. Gardens. http://www.innatoccidental.com r p Jenner Inn & Cottages 10400 Coast Hwy. 1, Jenner, CA 95450,707-865-2377,800-732-2377 Cozy rooms & cottages with ocean and river views, fireplaces, spas. Available for weddings, retreats. Rooms from $85; Cottages from $12S. http://www.lennerinn.com River's End Resort 11048 Coast Hwy. 1, Jenner, CA 95450, 707-865-2484, Fax 707-869-3252 Breathtaking view. At mouth of Russian River and Pacific. Finest continental cuisine. Call for brochure. Rms/cabins start at $98. MCN Salt Point Lodge Bar & Grill 23255 Coast Hwy. 1, Jenner, CA 95450, 707-847-3234,800-956-3437 17 miles North of Jenner Restaurant and Solarium Bar with spectacular ocean view. Hot tub, sauna & pool. Free satellite TV From $50-$137. Sonoma Coast Yilla & Country Inn 16702 Coast Hwy. 1, Bodega, CA 94922,707-876-9818 A luxurious retreat with the simple elegance of country living. Medi- terranean -style villa. 6 large guest rooms, fireplaces, private bathrooms, spa, pool. Meeting/wedding facilities. THE TNN at Occidenta WORLD Cum ELEGANCE IN A COUNTRY SMW. Tucked in among towering red- woods, just minutes from the Sonoma Coast and the Wine Country, there's a place where time stands still: a Victorian bed and breakfast with the perfect mix of comfort, charm and elegance. Completely restored by innkeeper Jack Bullard, and furnished with antiques, family heirlooms and original artwork, The Inn offers guests a choice of eight bedrooms with private baths, fireplaces, spa tubs, and a full gourmet breakfast. AAA ♦**♦ HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Santa Rosa/Petaluma Cavanagh Inn 10 Keller St. Petaluma, CA 94952 707-765-4657,888-765-4658 Victorian mansion and craftsman cottage with 7 guest rooms, 5 with private bath. Gourmet breakfast in- cluded daily Walk to historic down- town and river attractions. San Francisco 32 miles south. The Gables 4257 Petaluma Hill Rd. Santa Rosa, CA 95404 707-585-7777, 800 -GABLES -N An elegant Victorian Inn. Gourmet breakfasts, afternoon tea. Central in Sonoma Premium Wine Country. 4 - acre countrysetting. Rates $1 15-195. Goltermann Gardens & Country Inn PO. Box 409, Petaluma, CA 94953 707-762-1761 Three garden suites set in the midst of eight acres of beautiful, mani- cured gardens. Melilla Station Inn 5850 Melita Rd. Santa Rosa, CA 95409 707-538-7712,800-S24-3099 Cozy, Quaint country setting with antiQues & collectables. Near Wineries and Parks. Full Breakfast, afternoon refreshments. Pygmalion House 331 Orange St., Santa Rosa, CA 95401, 707- 526-3407 One of Santa Rosa's historical landmarks, built in 1880. A charm- ing Victorian. Full breakfast served. Sonoma Valley Gaige House Inn 13540 Arnold Dr. Glen Ellen, CA 95442 707-935-0237,800-93S-0237 "One of Wine Country's finest... (Fodors)" Small, stylish inn. Spa- cious. Great pool & garden. Chef - prepared breakfasts. The best coffee. No attitude. Sonoma Chalet 18935 Fifth St. West Sonoma, CA 95476, 707-938-3129 Separate cottages, private baths, fireplaces, complimentary break- fast. $85-145. Yictorian Garden Inn 316 E. Napa St. Sonoma, CA 95476 707-996-5339, 800-S43-5339 Luxurious rooms, some w/ private entrances & fireplaces. Authentic Victorian gardens, pool. Walk 1.5 bik to historic plaza, wineries, restaurants. http://www.victoriangardeninn.com E HOTELS/MOT 3 O PHONE KATEs MIDWEEK NUMBER RESTAURANT 1 LLS FROM RATES OF ROOMS SANTA Ros,VROIINLRI P:AKK Astro Motel 707-545-8555 $35 No 30 No 323 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa CA 95404 fax: 707-544-8754 Best Western Garden Inn 707-546-4031 $58 No 78 Yes 1 500 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa CA 95404 800-929-2771 Flamingo Resort Hotel &Fitness Center 707-545-8530 $79 Yes 166 Yes 2777 4th St., Santa Rosa CA 95405 800-848-8300 Days Inn Hotel 707-573-9000 $76 Yes 135 Yes 17S Railroad Ave., Santa Rosa CA 95401 800-354-7672 Doubletree Hotel 707-584-5466 $126 Yes 245 Yes One Doubletree Dr., Rohnert Park CA 94928 800-547-8010 Fountaingrove Inn 707-578-6101 $109 Yes 85 Yes 101 Fountaingrove Pky.. Santa Rosa CA 95403 800-222-6101 Good Nite Inn 707-584-8180 $33 No 123 No 5040 Redwood Dr., Rohnert Park CA 94928 fax: 707-584-1725 Hotel La Rose 707-S79-3200 $90 Yes 49 Yes 308 Wilson St., Santa Rosa CA 95401 800-527-6738 Los Robles Lodge 707-545-6330 $59 Yes 104 Yes 198S Cleveland Ave.. Santa Rosa CA 95401 800-255-6330 Ramada Limited 707-575-4600 $45 Yes 34 No 866 Hopper Ave., Santa Rosa CA 95403 800-266-4600 Sonoma County Hilton Santa Rosa 707-523-7555 $79 Yes 247 Yes 3555 Round Barn Blvd., Santa Rosa CA 95403 800-HILTONS Vintners Inn 707-575-7350 $148 Yes 44 Yes 4350 Barnes Rd., Santa Rosa CA 95403 800-421-2584 H EILDSBURG/WINDSOR Best Western Dry Creek Inn 707-433-0300 $55 Yes 102 Yes 198 Dry Creek Rd., Healdsburg CA 95448 800-222-5784 SONOMA COAST 14%,Bodega Bay Lodge Resort 707-875-3525 $140-225 Yes 78 Yes ,Jr103 Coast H . # I , Bode a Ba Ca 94923 800-368-2468 Bodega Coast Inn 707-875-2217 $89 Yes 44 No 521 Coast H . #31, Bodega Bay Ca 94923 800-346-6999 The Inn at the Tides 707-875-2751 $120 Yes 86 Yes 800 Coast Hwy, # 1, Bodega Bay CA 94923 800-541-7788 Negri's Occidental Hotel 707-874-3623 $48 Yes 24 Yes 3610 Bohemian Hwy., Occidental CA 95465 The Sea Ranch Lodge & Golf Links 707-785-2371 $125 Yes 20 Yes P O. Box 44, The Sea Ranch CA 95497 800-SFA-RANCH Surf Motel at Gualala 707-884-3571 $79-145 Yes 20 No 39170 S. Hwy. 1, Gualala CA 95445 888-451-SURF SONOMA VALLEY EI Dorado Hotel 707-996-3030 $85 Yes 26 Yes 405 First St. W., Sonoma CA 95476 800-289-3031 Sonoma Mission Inn 707-938-9000 $1 15 Yes 170 Yes 18140 Hwy, 12, Sonoma CA 95476 800-862-4945 Sonoma Valley Inn 707-938-9200 $79 Yes 72 No 550 2nd St. W., Sonoma CA 95476 800-334-5784 PETV UMA Best Western Petaluma Inn 707-763-0994 $64 No 75 Yes 200 S McDowell Blvd., Petaluma CA 94952 800-297-3846 ' Quality Inn Petaluma 707-664-1155 $69 Yes 110 No 5100 Montero Wav, Petaluma CA 94954 800-575-5155 BEYOND SONOMA COUNTY Embassy Suites Hotel & Conference Center 41 S-499-9222 $129-184 No 235 Yes 101 McInnis Pky., San Rafael CA 94903 800-362-2779 Yosemite Motels, Inc. 209-742-7106 $55 No 700+ Yes P O. Box 1989, Mariposa CA 95338 800-321-5261 Tr HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 KOOM PCbt MEETING HANDICAP SERVICE SPACE ACCLSS COMMENTS No No No Yes Near wineries, next to Burbank Gardens, free HBO. 2 Blocks to fairground . www.sterba.com/astro No Yes Yes Yes AAA 3 Diamond. Garden setting. In -room coffee & refrigs. Near wineries & redwoods. Sr, AAA, Corprates. Yes Yes Yes Yes Full service resort hotel with heated Olympic size pool. Spa and fitness center, tennis courts, golf, spa, romance packages available. Yes Yes Yes Yes Located in the heart of Santa Rosa. Adjacent to Railroad Souare and minutes from many activitiesl Yes Yes Yes Yes Centrally located just south of Santa Rosa, this full-service hotel features resort amenities, including tennis, golf, and Wine Center. Yes Yes Yes Yes Close to wineries & golf. Comp. continental breakfast. Golf, spa, wine pkgs available. 4 -diamond, AAA rating, www.fountaingroveinn.com No Yes Yes Yes Step above budget motel with budget prices. Pool, Spa, small event room, close to shopping. Yes No Yes Yes Downtown Santa Rosa. Member of Hispanic Hotels of America. Breakfast included. European atmosphere, superior service, individually decorated rooms. All modern conveniences. Yes Yes Yes Yes Next to Coddingtown Center, 100 shops. Lounge, hot tub, refrigerators. Kids under 16 free. Complimentary fitness center. In room coffee. AAA 3 Diamond. No Yes No Yes Gold Key Property. Free executive Continental breakfast. Free HBO. Several restaurants located within 100 feet. Yes Yes Yes Yes AAA -rated 4 -diamond hotel. Central to wineries & golf.' Pool & Jacuzzi. All rooms oversized. Yes No Yes Yes Set in a 45 -acre vineyard. Patios, balconies, fireplaces. John Ash & Co. restaurant. Spa & sundeck. Views of vineyards & courtyard. AAA 4 diamond. No Yes No Yes Complimentary bottle of wine & Continental breakfast. Pool, spa, fitness room. In room coffee. Near Russian River and Lake Sonoma. Yes Yes Yes Yes Panoramic oceanview rooms w/fireplaces and balconies. Pool, spa, fitness center, golf, beaches. 4 diamond AAA rated. 50yards from the water. Garden spa. All rooms have views, No No Yes Yes some with fireplaces, some with Roman spas. AAA 3 diamond. 86 Bay view rooms, complimentary breakfast, spa, sauna, Yes Yes Yes Yes golf packages. Bay view restaurant. No Yes No Yes AAA -rated in the village. Shops, famous restaurants near ocean, river, golf. tennis. No No Yes No One of the loveliest places in the world. 100 mi. north of the Golden Gate. A distinguished resort at the edge of the sea. No No No Yes Stay with us and fall asleep to the sounds of the sea. Close to restaurants, art galleries & golf. Some ocean views. AAA rated. surf@gualaia.com Yes Yes Yes Yes `i Complimentary wine upon arrival. Continental breakfast. t Heated pool. Ristorante Piatti. Bancuet facilities. Yes Yes Yes Yes Luxury resort & European -style spa. Two mineral water Dols & whirlpools. Acclaimed dining, tennis, golf nearb . No Yes Yes Yes A Best Western Hotel I blk from town plaza. Courtyard rms with fireplace & private balcony. Gift wine, complimentary continental breakfast delivered to your room. No Yes No Yes Quality accommodations, AAA approved, centrally located. Guest satisfaction our goal. No Yes Yes Yes 3 Diamond AAA. Free deluxe Cont. bkfst. Closest to Outlet Mall, restaurants & movie theaters nearby. Visit Historic Downtown Petaluma. Yes Yes Yes Yes Over 12,000 soft mtg space. Breakfast, managers evening reception included in price of suite. Indoor pool/24hr. fitness room. www.embassymarin.com No Yes Yes Yes Operator of 7 motels close to Yosemite National Park. Offering modest to elegant accommodations. I' HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Ranch Fort Ross Be%!a Bay Bodewky There are actually two Bodegas. Four miles inland is the town of Bodega, a Quiet village of Victorian shops that was the setting for the Hitchcock movie, "The Birds". The other, Bodega Bay, is on a coastal lagoon sheltered by Bodega Head. Bodega Bay was discovered by Spanish explorer Juan Francisco de la Bodegay Cuadra, and mercifully shortened to the present name. The fishing Fleet moored in Bodega Bay provides more than just local color. The boats go out daily and bring in catches for preparation in restaurants lining the waterfront. Soyou can believe the menus in Bodega Bay when they read "fresh". In addition to the commer- cial fleet there are fishing boats for charter. VdlleyFord A bit further inland is Valley Ford, a farming community that originally was the first stop in Sonoma County for the North Pacific Coast train from Sausalito which carried San Franciscans to the Russian River resorts and points north. Today it is a key "fork in the road" in western Sonoma County with one fork heading north toward the River along the old railroad right of way, and the other - leading to the coast. Panoramic Ocean Views Fireplaces, private terraces, a heated pool and spa. Daily Complimentary Wine Hour and more make the Bodega Bay Lodge the perfect coastal getaway. Adjacent to Doran Beach, close to Osmosis Japanese Enzyme Baths. Whale Watching and Wine Tasting nearby. �yK�i�e Ocean -view conference ',M space available. R 103 Coast Highway 1, Bodega Bay, CA 94923 800.368.2468 or 707.875.3525 http://woodsidehotels.com Jenner The town of Jenner is situated on headlands overlooking dramatic views of Goat Rock Beach and the spot where the Russian River meets the sea. Though not large, you'll find no lack of accommodations and good food in this picturesQue seaside village. Fort Ross Fort Ross State Park is located I I miles north of Jenner on Highway 1. It is a well preserved and rebuilt replica of the base of operations for Russian fur trappers who lived here in the early part of the 19th century. The Park itself is located on a scenic bluff and consists of several examples of authentic Russian buildings of the Ir HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 period. One original structure, the Commandant's House, still stands and is the oldest existing wooden structure west of the Mississippi. The rest - a chapel, two blockhouses and the stockade have been carefully rebuilt. There is a visitors center and museum with artifacts and exhibits that trace Russian and Indian culture of the period. NSCdRM111 With examples of its distinctive architecture nestled into ocean view bluffs and meadows, The Sea Ranch offers many good reasons to stop a while on a Sonoma coastal journey. A planned community, The Sea Ranch has its own landing strip, tennis, an 18 hole golf course and ten beaches. The restaurant, lodge and store are open to the public and there is public access to beaches. We welcome your comments about this publication, and hope you find it a useful planning resource to enhance your enjoyment of Sonoma County. We would appreciate your mentioning Vintage Views when you patronize our business in the County. Thank You. �17 SM Vacation Home Rentals 1 - 5 Bedroom Homes Ocean View-F'replaces Hot Tubs Mid -week • Weekend • Week • Month Mid -week Golf Discounts �-800-888-3�65 or visit us at: www.sonomacoast.com Tr HOTLINE: 707-S86-8100 Ripley "Believe It or Not" Memorial Museum Cloverdale Historical Society Museum, 126A N. Cloverdale Blvd., Cloverdale. Open by Appointment only. 707-894-2067 Depot Park Museum, 270 First St., Sonoma. Open 1:00 - 4:30 p.m. Wed -Sun. 707-938-1762 Discovery Center of Sonoma Cosily. New hands-on children's Museum. Santa Rosa Plaza Shopping Mall, Santa Rosa. Open Noon - 5:00 p.m., Sat & Sun only except holidays. 707-575-1014 Fort Ross Historical Park & Museum, Hwy. 1, eleven miles north of termer. Open daily 10:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. 3 4 707-847-3286 On tap: ealdsburg Museum, 21 Matheson St., Healdsburg. Open 1 1:00 a.m. - :00 p.m., Tues -Sun, 707-431-3325 ick London Slate Historical Park, 400 London Ranch Rd., Glen Ellen. Park open aily in summer, 9:30 a.m. - 7:00 p.m., balance of ear daily 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Museum open aily, 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 07-938-5216 ilber Burbank Home & Gardens, anta Rosa Avenue & Sonoma Avenue, Santa Rosa. )pen for tours Apr -Oct 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. gardens open daily throughout theyear 8:00 a.m. - usk. Group tours available by appointment. 07-524-5445 elaluma Adobe Stale Historic Park, 325 Adobe Rd., Petaluma. Open daily 10:00 a.m. 5:00 p.m. 707-762-4871 Plaluma Museum, 20 Fourth St., Petaluma. Open Mon, Thur, Fri & Sat 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. 707-778-4398 Railroad Square Historical District, Downtown exit in Santa Rosa. Restaurants, antique shops, galleries and more. Ripley "Believe It or Not" Memorial Museum, 492 Sonoma Ave., Santa Rosa. Open 10:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Wed -Sun Apr -Oct. 707-524-5233 Sonoma County Museum, 425 7th St., Santa Rosa. Open 11:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Wed -Sun 707-579-1500 Sonoma Slate Hislorical Park, Sonoma Mission & Sonoma Barracks I st St. East & 3rd St. West on Spain Street, Sonoma. Open daily 10:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. 707-938-1519 West County Museum, 261 South Main St., Sebastopol. Open Fri, Sat, Sun 1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m. 707-829-6711. Something's Brewing in the Wine Countryi Celebrate the Renaissance of Craft Breads & Brews June 14&15, 1997 Jack London State Park Glen Ellen, California Brewers, bakers, cigar -makers, celebrity chefs, regional specialty products Brewing & bread baking demonstrations, tastings, exhibits, live music, label art, specialty foods, and dinners highlight Ado t -A -Park this educational & epicurean extravaganza! For more information call: 707-939-9666; fax: 707-939-9669 Grainaissance Faire, P.O. Box 1569, Glen Ellen, CA 95442 V HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 In Sonoma County, th alleys, hills and eoastli prow "" `rtile ground for a culture and economy in which food and drink are central to the quality of life. The climate here nourishes the connoisseur in people who both embrace new trends and respect old traditions. The phenomenal national proliferation of brewpubs and mierobreweries, taking the best of the Old World beer makin techniques and molding them to suit the local tastes, climate and agricultural resources, started right here in Sonoma County. In 1978, Jack McAuliffe returned to Sonoma from military service in Britain to start New Albion Brewing, America's first "micro" brewery, on 8th Street East in Sonoma. When Sir Francis Drake landed in the Bay Area he called the place "New Albion" (New England), and McAuliffe's bottles of ales, porters and stouts picked up the tradition, bearing labels which featured a woodcut -style illustration of Drake's ship the Golden Hind. The inertia of New Albion Brewing set the stage w for Mendocino Bre9n Company whose Hopland Brewery opened its doors to the public in 1983 as California's first brewpub since prohibition. The brewpubs of Sonoma County have become critically -acclaimed restaurants, in their own right, with emphasis on fresh, seasonal local ingredients. They offer v " imaginative and varied menus of fine food ,' award-wrinning ales, and seasonal specialty Wine Country Brewn HAND-CRAFTED ALES FROM THE HEART OF brews that are well worth exploring.SONOMA COUNTY'S WINE COUNTRY feature live music, and all ofer the BEAR REPUBLIC comfortable atmosphere of a local socials 433 -BEER center and watering hole. ...T �4S HEALDSBURG AYE. • DOWNTOWN HEALDSBURG XONSTIN. TIL. BREWING COMPANY Open daily 1011881-2204 Sample rrr fine hantcreltet brews at our gourmet Delicatessen and Market located at Norbel Champagne Cellars. 3250 River Road, Guerneville ,Z E THIRD STRFFT C L . f�LEWOfiICS � 3 ' BREWPUB Q O .a �D THE POWERHOUSE BREWING CO. Unique Microbrewery Restaurant in a restored 1903 historic landmark, featuring Outstanding Cuisine, Handcrafted Ales. Voted Best Microbrewery in Sonoma County. Award-winning Microbrewed Beers Sonoma County's Oldest "Brewpub" OMA BREWING Inside of "Dempsey's" in Petaluma 50 East Washington St., Petaluma, 94952 0 765-9694 10 YEARS -3,000,000 BEERS For 10 years our downtown Santa Rosa brewpub has chugged along brewing award-winning ales and serving fantastic food. Come Visit Usl 544 -HOPS Corner of Seventh & B Streets • Santa Rosa vn M Sonoma Valley Last year, Sonoma celebrated the t sotb anniversary of the raising of California's Bear Flag. Sonoma's City Hall (background) has all four identical sides facing outward from its focal point in the center of the Plaza. Kenwood Glen Ellen Sonoma There are several theories regarding the name j "Valley of the Moon'. One maintains that the Indians named it so for the way the moon rose over a jagged portion of the Mayacamas Mountain, seeming to rise and set several times on its way over the ridges. Another attributes the name to the crescent shape of the Sonoma Valley. Sonoma The town of Sonoma was the site of the northernmost mission in the California chain of Missions, and early life centered around the Mission San Francisco de Solano, opposite the northeast corner of Sonoma Plaza. Sonoma is rich in history. The Bear Flag revolt of 1846 symbolized independence from Mexican rule and paved the way for the territory to join the United States. The present day Plaza is a lush blend of history, dining and shopping. Currently there are over 20 restaurants either "on the SQuare" or a few steps from it. The Plaza is also the site for such varied events as ox roasts, turkey barbecues. wine tastings, band concerts and a farmers' market. Two parades with authentic "home town" Flavor navigate around the Plaza— one on the Fourth of luly, the other celebrating Vintage Festival Weekend in late September. SONOMA THERAPY Unwind with a relaxing getaway at Sonoma's only full-service luxury resort. • 170 rooms, 34 with fireplace • 2 natural hot mineral water swimming pools • California's most complete European -style Spa • Nationally acclaimed dining • Full conference facilities • Tennis and Golf **** lca SONOMA MISSION INN'&SPA FOR RESERVATIONS CALL (S00862-4945 Ir HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 General Vallejo and Count Agoston Haraszthy were the earliest viticulturists in the Valley and soon vied with each other for some of the first wine awards in the state. Today Sonoma Valley wines and those from the nearby Carneros region are hailed as some of the finest in the world. In addition to wineries, Sonoma Valley also has several cheese making operations and bakeries. The Valley is studded with historical sites. Local information and walking tour maps may be obtained at the Sonoma League for Historic Preservation located in the EI Paseo on the Plaza's east side. Accommodations range from Quaint, tucked away bed and breakfast inns to larger hotels and resorts. A nearby raceway offers a full schedule of major motorsports events from NASCAR stock cars to dragsters, motorcycles and a classic antique car race and wine taste. There is also action in the air. Small private planes may Fly in at either of two local airports, and visitors may take scenic biplane or glider Flights over the Valley. Kenwood Kenwood, in the heart of the Valley, has several award-winning wineries, a historic railroad depot, and nearby Sugerloaf Ridge State Park with miles of hiking trails, horseback trails, and picnic ONE BLOCK FROM HISTORIC SONOMA PLAZA • Welcome gift bottle of wine • Fitness center • Romantic garden courtyard with pool & spa • Complimentary continental breakfast delivered to room Courtyard rooms with private balcony & fireplace OWNER vs VVd � st��i � 4 w O .,► Visit the Home of Sonoma Jack! r ~ ON THE PLAZA 1N HISTORIC SONOMA n- ---= Gourmet Deli & Gifts Open Daily 8:30-5:30 SONOMA ,..: CHEESE FACTORY 1 i v kG areas. On the Fourth of lul ,, Kenwood hosts the "World Championship Pillow Fights". Glen Ellen Glen Ellen's lack London State Historic Park contains the famous novelist's home and "Beauty Ranch". Glen Ellen is also the site of several wineries with tasting rooms, and a bookstore with the world's largest collection of London's manuscripts and memorabilia. Describing the area in his novel, "Valley of the Moon," London wrote: "Who will reap what I have sown in this almighty sweet land?" Today, in the 1990's, it is the visitor to Sonoma Valley who reaps the bounty of her recreational riches. EL DORADO HOTEL Renew yourself in a place where bistory of the wine country blends exquisitely with the luxuries and tastes of today. The historic and charming Fl Dorado Hotel on the town square ofSonoma. Complimentary continental breakfast . Split of wine . Heated pool 1800-289-3031 . 707-996-3030 http//:www.hoteleldorado.com RISTORANTE PIATTI Renowned for its skillfully prepared, regional Italian specialities. Open 7 days a week for Lunch & Dinner 707-996-2351 Ristorante Piatti 405 FIRST STREET WEST, SONOMA CA 95476 Ir HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Wine Country Getaway Package One not stay, ndd-week (Sunday -Thursday) plus a $50.00 certificate for dinner at Ristorante Piatti $145 per couple 5/1/97-10/31/97 $120 per couple 11/1/97-12/30/97 Tax & Gratuity not i SI..�I�000. Applebee's Neighborhood Grill & Bar 2250 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa, 707-578-0552 and Old Redwood Highway at Highway 101, Petaluma 707-792-0500. Featuring signature ribs, burgers, steaks, salads & full bar. From I lam daily. Sunday Brunch 1 1-2. Hunter Steakhouse of Santa Rosa 3785 Cleveland Ave., Santa Rosa, 707-542-5705. Prime rib, choice steaks & seafood. Lunch Mon -Fri, Dinner daily. Near hotels, wineries. just off 101. Casual attire and children welcome! Lucas Wharf Restaurant &Bar 595 Hwy I , Bodega Bay, 707-875-3522. Fish Market 707-875-3562. Dine over the water watching the fishing Fleet del - today's catch, full bar. Lunch/ dinner, $6.95-16.95. MCN/D. Maxi's in the Doubletree Hotel One Doubletree Dr., Rohnert Park, 707-584-5466. Finest in contemporary California cuisine & wine. Enjoy Sunday brunch, voted best in Sonoma County. McBears Saloon & Dining House 23 Petaluma Blvd., Historic downtown Petaluma. 707-765- 2121. Brick walls, murals, old photos. Patio, BBQ, steaks, pasta, burgers, salads. I I beers on tap. Petaluma Queen Riverboat Dining 255 Weller St., Petaluma, 707- 762-2100. Dine in the romantic atmosphere of old-time riverboat travel. Lunch, brunch, dinner. Weekend live entertainment and dancing. The Tides Wharf Restaurant & Bar 835 Coast Hwy. 1, Bodega Bay. 707-875- 3652. Breakfast, lunch, dinner daily. Fish market, bait & tackle, gift shop, snack bar. ASIAN Jhanthong Banbua 2400 Mendocino Ave., Central Santa Rosa, 707-528-8048. Delicate Thai golden dishes. Fresh ingredients. No MSG. Three -star - Press Democrat. Mon -Sat Lunch I 1-3/Dinner 5-10. Yao Kiku Japanese Restaurant & Sushi Bar 2700 Yulupa Ave., Santa Rosa (off Bethards), near Bennett Valley Golf Course, 707-578-8180. Lunch & Dinner. Tempura, Sashimi, Ter'yaki. YAaKiKU JAPANESE RESTAURANT Santa Rosa's Finest •Sushi Bar • Fresh Ingredients • Sonoma CountyWines (707) 578-8180 Mon. -Sat. 11:30-9:30 2700 Yulupa Ave., Santa Rosa (Annadel Center, next to LonQ's) ITALIAN Depot Hotel Restaurant and Italian Garden 241 1 st St. West. Sonoma, 707- 938-2980. Delightful Northern Italian cuisine. $5-I5. One block from Plaza. Garden with Roman fountain & poolside dining. Historic stone building. Chef owned. Dinucd's Italian Dinners 14485 Valley Ford Rd., Valley Ford, 707-876-3260. Italian dinners, seafood, steaks. Family -style. 3rd generation of fine Italian dinners. Mistral 1229 N. Dutton Ave.. Santa Rosa, 707-578-451 1. Restaurant, catering services. French/Spanish/Italian cui- sine from Sonoma County products. Negri's 3700 Bohemian Hwy., Occidental. 707-823-5301. Original Occidental family -style Northern Italian cuisine. Variety of pastas, duck, prawns, steak. Open every day I I am- I Opm. Delicate Thai Selden Dishes • Frisk 111relieets • Ne MSC 2480 Mendocino Ave. Santa Rosa • 181.528-8848 Open Monday Saturday lunch: 11-3 pm Dinner: 5-10 pm Reservations requir Fri. -Sat. Nigh North Beach Restaurant 1512 Stockton St., San Francisco, 415-392-1700, fax -415-392- 0230. Northern Italian cuisine, home cured prosciutto, homemade pasta and one of top 100 outstanding wine lists. Major credit cards. Ristorante Capri 115 Fourth St., Santa Rosa, 707- 525-0815. Located in Historic Railroad SQuare, Luigi Di Ruocco prepares authentic Italian cuisine from the Island of Capri. Great food, atmosphere and hospitality. Lunch/Dinner/Catering. Union Hotel 3731 Main St., Occidental, 707- 823-1717 or 707-874-3555. Historic dining establishment, dining room, banQuets, bakery/ cafe, saloon, pizzeria, Mediterra- nean courtyard. WINE COUNTRY CUISINE Applerrood Inn & Restaurant 13555 Hwy. 116 near Guerneville, 707-869-9093. Four course, casually elegant dining with wine country rustic cuisine at candlelit fireside tables. By reservation: Tuesday - Saturday. Equus Restaurant al Founlaingrove Inn 101 Fountaingrove Pkwy., Santa Rosa, 707-578-0149. Sweep- stakes award winner Sonoma County Harvest Fair. Extensive wine list. Lunch: Mon thru Fri, dinner 7 nights. The Farmhouse Inn (?a~ dee W442 'd Fla c.>f: 7Booebee's Santa Rosa Petaluma 2250 Santa Rosa Ave. Old Redwood Hwy ®101 Next to Costco Next to Petaluma Cinemas Ir HOTLINE: 707-S86-8100 & Restaurant 7871 River Rd., Forestville. CA 95436. 707-887-3300, 800-464-6642. Award winning CA wine country cuisine. Intimate dining in county elegance. Available for weddings and private parties. V/MC/AMEX. (foRlinued orl Page 40) Whdtl'l S "Wine Country" Cuisine? The very existence of a wine country cuisine is a direct response to the great wines that are being produced here in California. In the "early days" of wine in California (which was really only the I960's), winemakers tried to duplicate the great wines of Europe, especially those of France. Big, block- buster Cabernets and Chardonnays were so intense that they overpowered almost any food they accompanied. We cooks tried our best to create dishes that would match these wines. Because of our training, we tended to create variations on French and, to some extent, Italian, dishes. It was a gestation period for both winemakers and cooks. Then, a curious and wonderful thing happened. For winemakers, it was the blind tastings in France in 1976 in which a Californi*Cabernet and Chardonnay beat the best of their French tciunterparts. For cooks, it was that we began to travel to other parts of the world and bring back flavors, ingredients, and techniQues that were altogether foreign to the French tradition. In the 1980's and 1990's California wines changed dramatically and this time it was in response to the food. Blg Cabernets and Chardonnays became subtler, more approachable. "Lesser" varieties that better complemented the strong flavor of "ethnic" foods (such as Sauvignon Blanc, Gewurtztra miner, and Pinot Noir with spicy Asian dishes) became more important. California chefs and winemakers began working together to create harmony and synergy at the table rater than fight for attention. During this time we (both winemakers and cooks) began exploring the uniQue and rich agricultural microclimates available in the California wine country to grow a broad spectrum of grapes and foods. In Sonoma County, we saw the re-establishment of small family farms devoted to growing all kinds of spectacular new produce, and raising animals such as game birds and organic Sonoma Iamb that fired the cook's imagination. We were learning the very thing that had made French and European food and wine so great—the importance of the land and is connection to the cook. ' My passion became to explore with farmers and ranchers all that could be produced locally. This approach was consistent with my lifelong passion for the farming stage of cooking and for simple preparations. In 1980, when I started my restaurant, John Ash & Company, in Santa Rosa in Sonoma County, I enlisted every grower I could find to supply us with ingredients, which instilled in me a credo that I believe in even more strongly today: Farming is the first step in cooking. A great cook is only as great as his or her ingredients. In my view, great meals result from spending more time finding great ingredi- ents than in the kitchen preparing them. On its own, a great recipe does not create a uniQue taste experience. The raw ingredients are the stars of the show. The role of the cook, then, is like that of a stage director in a play: to coax and encourage the best out of his or her stars—in this case, the vine -ripened tomato, the fresh -from -the -water snapper, the dead -ripe berry, the bundle of fresh, bright basil. Winemakers have a saying that applies eQually to food: "The secret of makinggreat wine is to grow great grapes and then not screw them up." by John Ash from Page 38) Terrace Grill al the Flamingo Resort Hotel 4th & Farmers Ln., Santa Rosa, 707-545-8530. Warm ambiance overlooking beautiful gardens, wine country cuisine. Bkfst, lunch, dinner, banQuets, cabaret nightclub. Lisa Hemenway's 714 Village Ct., Santa Rosa, 707- 526-51 1 1, Fax 578-5736. "Jewel of the Wine Country" with an award-winning wine list. California patio dining. Full bar. Enjoy scrumptious desserts. John Ash & Co. Restaurant River Rd. at Hwy. 101, 4330 Barnes, Santa Rosa, 707-527- 7687. Wine Country dining at its best. Adjacent to the beautiful Vintners Inn. Major credit cards. Madrona Manor 1001 Westside Rd., Healdsburg, 800-258-4003. A truly fine dining restaurant. "The eQual of any in San Francisco." (Chronicle). Mixx Corner of Fourth & Davis, Santa Rosa, 707-573-1344. Fine dining. Bistro -style cuisine. Gold Medal/Best of Show desserts & wine list. Full bar. Lunch M -E Dinner nightly. BanQuet Room. The Sea Ranch lodge Restaurant Hwy. I at Sea Walk Dr., The Sea Ranch, 800 -SEA -RANCH. Sumptuous gourmet California cuisine, bountiful wine list & dramatic ocean views. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and Sunday Brunch. River's End 1 1048 Coast Hwy. 1, Jenner, 707- 865-2484, fax 707-869-3252. Innovative gourmet dinners, clifftop dining room. Breathtaking river & ocean views, full bar. Brunch, lunch & dinner. Timberhill Ranch 35755 Hauser Bridge Rd., Cazadero, 707-847-3258. Serving fresh California cuisine. Fine dining, Mobil 4 -Star. Relais & Chateaux. Afternoon tea daily. Lunch & dinner by reservation only. FRENCH Chez Peyo Country French Restaurant 2295 Gravenstein Hwy. S. Sebastopol, 707-823-1262. Charming restaurant, beautiful garden setting. Lunch 11:30- 2:30; dinner 5-9; Sun brunch 10-2; closed Monday. DELI/CAFE Bennett Yalley Golf Course Cafe 3330 Yulupa Ave,. Santa Rosa, 707-S28-1 192 (cafe), 576-9841 (bar). Open daily. Breakfast, lunch til 3, snacks & full bar. Banouets/ meetings to 100 people. G01 ?RMENT TO GO Mixx Express 707-S73-5845. Adjacent to Mixx Restaurant at Fourth & Davis in Santa Rosa's Historic Railroad SQuare. Gourmet Take -Out, Catering, Entrees, box lunches. fresh baked desserts/pastries, & coffee drinks. Mon - Fri from 7am. Sat. I Oam. MICROBREWERIES/ BREW PUBS Dempseys/Sonoma Brewing Co. 50 E. Washington St, Petaluma, 707-765-9694 Fresh adventure- some food, local wines, award winning beer, hand crafted beers. Patio dining on the river. Lunch & dinner daily. MCN. Powerhouse Brewing Company 268 Petaluma Ave., Sebastopol, 707-829-9171. UniQue brewpub in a restored 1903 historic landmark, seasonal cuisine, handcrafted ales, patio dining, music and folk art. Santa Rosa Brewing Co. Corner of 7th & B Sts., downtown Santa Rosa, 707-544-4677. Conveniently located. Casual, healthy brewpub cuisine. Award winning, freshy brewed ales. Live entertainment. Sonoma Yalley Brewing Company 529 First St. West, Sonoma, 707- 938-2122. Brewpub on SW corner of Sonoma Plaza. House -brewed ales, southwest cuisine, courtyard dining, live ent. Lunch/dinner daily. ENTERTAINMENT Night Clubs Club Max Located inside the Doubletree Hotel, One Doubletree Dr., Rohnert Park. A popular night spot for fun and entertainment. Features Pool tables, big screen N, happy hour & live bands on weekends. McNears Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, 21 Petaluma Blvd., Petaluma, 707- 765-6665. Historic Downtown Petaluma. Dancing, live entertain- ment, movies, private parties, weddings, TV, sports. Full bar, banQuets. Catering Donna You Edelkrantz Catering Co., Petaluma, CA, 707-778-0580. FilmNideo/TV/location specialists. Corporate/Private Parties. Food For Thought Catering, phone/fax Bonnie 707-546-8121. Blends natural ingredients with tasteful event coordination. Professional chef custom designs exQuisite full service catering, weddings, boxed lunches and platters. Oui Cater, 707-43 1-8355. Full service catering company serving Sonoma County since 1978. Emphasis on menus using local Sonoma County products_ Pacific Connection, 1825 Robin Hood Ln., Santa Rosa, CA 95405, 707-S73-0757. Award winning Chef/Partner Donna Wegener creates visually exciting & superb tasting cuisines. Detailed attention to service & ambiance. Park Avenue Catering Co., 3565 # I Standish Ave., Santa Rosa. CA 95407, 707-585-7883. Specializing in fresh gourmet, local food with beautiful presentations, we cater small intimate gatherings as well as larger functions, to 2000 guests. Wine Valley Catering, 707-963-1345, fax 707-963- 5860. A full service catering company specializing in weddings, corporate events, theme parties, BBQ's and special occasions. You are invited for a compli- mentary tastingl OTHER ACCOMMODA- TIONS/CAMPGROUNDS Casini Ranch Family Campground, 22855 Moscow Rd.; PO. Box 22, Duncans Mills, CA 95430. 800- 451-8400. 225 sites on river, store, boats. Rates $17-24. MCN/D/AE. Ir HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Cloverdale Wine Country ROA, 26460 River Rd., Cloverdale, CA 95425. 800-368-4558, 707- 894-3337. Wooded tent sites, log Kamping Kabins & RV hookups. Pool, fishing pond, mini -golf, rec hall & hiking. Petaluma ROA Campground Resort, 20 Rainsville Rd., Petaluma, CA 94952. 800 -992 -CAMP. Cabin, RV, Tent, Group Area, Pool, Spa. Summer Kids FUN! San Francisco Tours. Open All Year. Group/ Monthly Rates. RESORTS/RETREATS Sweet Reunion Inn & Resort 16124 Drake Rd., Guerneville, CA 95446. 800-310-0804, 707- 869-9769. On Russian River. Charming cottages, 9 RV hookups welcoming couples/families, pvt beach, redwoods, Quiet walk to town. Weekly/group rates. Timberbill Ranch 35755 Hauser Bridge Rd., Cazadero, CA 95421. 707-847- 3258. Country resort located near Sonoma Coast with views, fine dining, tennis, pool, jacuzzi. 80 acres, individual cottages. Westerbeke Ranch Conference Center 2300 Grove, Sonoma, CA 95476. 707-996-7546, 800-994-8094. Private retreat. 100 acres, pool, sauna, hot tub. MIS room, meals, lodging incl. Rates based on grp size from $94. VACATION RENTALS Aggies Yacalion Home Rentals 257 Dutton Ave., Santa Rosa, CA 95407, 707-571-7680, 800- 452-1700. A spacious home six miles west of Calistoga on a secluded hillside with spectacular views. Great for retreats, meetings and weddings. Bodega Bay & Beyond 1400 Hwy. 1, Bodega Bay, CA 94923. 707-875-3942, 800- 888-3565. Furnished ocean -view homes on the beautiful Sonoma Coast. Weekend, weekly & monthly rentals. Visit us at: www.sonomacoast.com Sage Hen Box 7231, Cotati, CA 94928. 707-792-2990. Secluded, fully furnished Cotati home on 1.5 acres. Easy access to coast, wine country, San Francisco. Weekend, weekly or monthly rental. Rams Head Realty P.O. Box 123, The Sea Ranch, CA 95497. 707-785-2427, 800- 785-3455. 125 fully -furnished homes, fireplaces, some hot tubs. 2 night min, swimming, tennis, golf. From $ 1 75/2nights. Twin Towers Yacalion Rentals 707-433-4443. Featuring fine Vacation Cottages and Homes around Healdsburg wine country. Comfort- ably accommodating 2-10 persons. Many with beach frontage on the magnificent Russian River. Advertising/ Marketing/ Design Benefield, Levinger, McEndy & Vernon, 495 First St. W., Sonoma, CA 95476, 707-938- 3080. Advertising, Design, Marketing, P.O.S., Logos, Copywriting, Media Planning, Print Collateral, Television, Radio, Video Production. Slarbird Creative, Petaluma -Sebastopol, 707-778- 7277 or 707-829-0277. Direct marketing and marketing communications. ASSOCIATIONS Alexander Yalley Wine Growers, PO. Box 730, Geyserville, CA 95441, 707-431-2894. A membership organization dedicated to promoting awareness of the Alexander Valley wine region. Free wineries map available. Historic Railroad Square Association, P.O. Box 4114, Santa Rosa, CA 95402. Santa Rosa's "Old Town". Turn of the century buildings with many great eating places, coffee houses, shops, antique stores & lodging. Marin County Convention & Yisilors Bureau, Avenue of the Flags, San Rafael, CA 94903, 415-472-7470. Destination marketing, visitor services, convention and film production services for Marin County. Petaluma Yisilors Program, 799 Baywood Dr., Ste. 1, Petaluma, CA 94954, 707-769- 5640, 707-769-0429. Free information including visitor guides, maps, attractions, free tours and events. Select Sonoma County Products, c/o 1055 W. College Ave. #194 (mail), Santa Rosa, CA 95401, 707-824-1974. Hundreds of specialty food & beverage products. Call for a SSC Products Guide. Sonoma County Farm Trails, P.O. Box 6032, Santa Rosa, CA 95406, 707-824-2060. Visit open farms. Seasonal products, tours. events. For color map send $2 handling. Call or write. Family Fun! Sonoma County Farmlands Group, PO. Box 3515, Santa Rosa, CA 95402, 707-576-0162. Non-profit farmland preservation and promotion of local agriculture. Ongoing Food and Wine Tastings and Harvest Dinners. Sonoma County Wineries Association California Welcome Center, 5000 Roberts Lake Rd., Rohnert Park, CA 94928, 800-939- 7666, 707-586-3795. Wine castings, gift shop, group programs. Complete Sonoma County winery information. Open 9-5, 7 days/week. Sonoma Yalley Yinlners & Growers Alliance, 9 East Napa St., Sonoma, CA 95476, 707-935- 0803, fax 707- 935-1947. Association represent- ing 37 vintners and 120 growers. Banks/Merchant Services American Express, TRS Co. Inc., 525 Market St., Ste. 3660, San Francisco, CA 94105, 800-528-5200. Offering merchant/customer services for all that include the American Express card. Five days/wk, Mon -Fri. National Bank of the Redwoods, I I I Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa, CA 95404, 707-573-4800. Sonoma Naliondl Bank, 801 Fourth St., Santa Rosa, CA. 95404, 707-579-2265. 6641 Oakmont Dr., Oakmont, CA 95409, 707-538-9370. 9078 Brooks Rd. S., Windsor, CA 95492, 707-837-2100. Brochure Distribution Certified Folder Display Service, Inc., 203 Lawrence Ave., S., San Francisco, CA 94080, 415-589- 31 17, fax 415-589-1915. The West's largest visitor attraction brochure display & distribution service. Tr HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Services Convention/Film Services EDCAN Productions, 707-539-2349. Gene Canevari Location Scout, Location Manager, Location Consultant, Location Files, Line Producer, Production Services. Features/ Commercials/Videos/Still Shoots. Halls Executive Gifts and Awards, 1300 4th St., Santa Rosa, CA, 95404. 707-546-9220. Mon -Fri 9-5:30. Clocks, Crystal, Desk Sets, Silver, Wedding gifts and invitations. Winespeak, P.O. Box 817, Glen Ellen, CA 95442, 707-996-7304, fax 707-996-2136. Betsy Fischer designs & conducts entertaining, educational wine seminars for groups, large and small. Convention/ Conference Sites Alliance Redwoods Conference Grounds, 6250 Bohemian Hwy., Occiden- tal, 800-576-2509. Scenic redwoods,year round conference/ retreat center, various lodging, food service from 25-350. http://www.sonic.net/—alliance. Four Winds, Inc., 707-824-0917. An Experiential Training Company. Teamwork should be a reflex, not an exercise! We are the largest provider of team building Ropes Courses in California. Sebastopol Country Gardens, 5186 Gravenstein Hwy. So., Sebastopol, CA 95472, 707-7954747. Private Restaurant & Bar. AntiQue decor. Creative cuisine From hors d'oeuvres & BBQs to Elegant Buffets. Wine Tasting/Dinner/ Dancing; Gazebo Garden Receptions. All Business Events. Sonoma County Fair & Exposition, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa, 95404, 707-545-4200. Exhibit halls, golf course, horse racing. County Fair dates )uly 23 through August 5, 1996. Sonoma County Yeterans Auditoriums, 2300 County Center Dr., # 120A, Santa Rosa, CA 95403, 707-527-2087. Seven buildings for receptions, trade shows, dances, meetings. Accommodat- ing groups from 10 to 2400. Rates hourly $7-75. Yilla Chanticleer, 1248 N. Fitch Mt., Healdsburg, CA, 95448, 707-431-3301. Built in 1910. Available for conferences, retreats, weddings. 17 acres. Accommodates up to 600. Cultural Arts Cultural Arts Council of Sonoma County, P.O. Box 7400, Santa Rosa, CA 95407, 707 -579 -ARTS. ARTrails, open studios, ongoing exhibitions, calendar of events, artists registry & resource center. Luther Burbank Center for the Aris, 50 Mark West Springs Rd. (at Hwy 101), Santa Rosa, 707- 546-3600. A broad range of live performances and visual art exhibits for adults and children. Santa Rosa Symphony, Luther Burbank Center, 50 Mark West Springs Rd., Santa Rosa, 95403, 707-546-8742. Classical series Oct -May, Summer Pops concert/picnic, Redwoods Music Fest in August, educa- tional programs. Spreckels Performing Arts Center, 5409 Snyder Ln., Rohnert Park, 94928, 707-584-1700 or 707- 586-0936. Live theatre, music and dance - Pacific Alliance Stage Co., Rohnert Park Chamber Orchestra, Smuin Ballets/SF & more. Destination Management A Taste of California, 527 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa, CA 95401, 707-575- 9145, 808-385-2680. Distinctive Area Tours, Specialists in Incentive Marketing, Full Servicel Eagle Enterprises Tours, 2777 Yulupa Ave., #214, Santa Rosa, CA 95405, 707-546- 9778, fax: 707-546-9778. "One-stop" shopping for customized corporate program design, meetings, events, custom tours, incentives, & ground transport. HMS Tours, 707 4th St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404, 800-367-5348, fax 707-526-9147. Meetings & Incentives, Sonoma County's oldest & largest group specialist. Full service! Pacific Connection, 1825 Robin Hood Ln., Santa Rosa, CA 95405, 707-573- 0757. Planning and producing successful meetings and special events. Ground travel, in-house catering, tour and off-site programs, and various other services. Premier Events, 10 Fourth St., Ste. 223, Santa Rosa, CA 95401, 707-575- 1678, fax 707-575-0329. Your wine country ambassador will custom design incentive, corporate, association programs. Exclusive locations. email:dmerga@cds I net Internet Marketing Services FreeRun Technologies, Developer of www.sonoma.com a large umbrella web site for all your travel planning needs. Select from various lodging and entertainment sites as well as wine, wineries and events. Publications Coast Magazine, P.O. Box 695, Gualala, CA 95445, 707-884-4019, 800-984-3422. Every issue our calendar, articles, & advertising provide information helping peopple enjoy Northern California. J.R. Publications, 4928 Rincon Ave., Santa Rosa, CA 95409, 707-539-3585. Publishers of wedding and reception site guide for Napa/ Solano, Contra Costa, Marin & Sonoma Counties. Call for the names of our distributors. The Press Democrat, 427 Mendocino Ave., PO Box 569, Santa Rosa, CA 95402, 707-546-2020. Sonoma County's Daily Newspaper. Daily Circulation: 98,415. Regional Yisitor Publications, 537 G St., Eureka, CA 95501, 707-443-4887,800-640- 8439. Publishers of Sonoma Visitor, Marin Visitor, Mendocino Visitor, Humboldt Visitor, Del Norte/Curry Visitor, and numerous other locations. Richard Sur low Productions, 884 Second St., Santa Rosa, CA 95404, 707-578-3300, fax 707-578-8450, Email: rmsurlow@wco.com. Publishers of Homes & Land, Home Guide & Rental Guide Magazines and one of the areas busiest Internet sites, www.homes.com. Spotlight's Wine Country Guide, 5 Kenilworth Ct., Novato, CA 94945, 415-898-7908. A monthly full color, handy magazine serving Northern Caffornia's visitors to the Wine Country North of San Francisco. Call or send $3 for handling. Sleppin-OuUFrancis Publications, P O. Box 1458, Ft. Bragg CA 95437, 707-964-4193. For 13 years, providing Wine Country visitors with a vast resource guide to the region's world-class wines, bountiful harvest, small towns & backroads. Yinlage Publications, 764 Adobe Dr., Santa Rosa, CA 95404, 707-538-8981, fax 707-538-8982. Mail orders 800-651-8953. Sonoma County and Napa Valley Guidebooks. The Yisitor's Grapevine, 707-526-7086, fax 707-526- 7059. State of the art network to serve the needs of hotel guests with local businesses. The inter -active information service covers both Sonoma & Napa Counties. Purveyors Alvarado St. Bakery, 500 Martin Ave., Rohnert Park, CA 94928, 707-585-3293. Largest organic whole grain bakery in the country producing a complete line of sprouted wheat breads, bagels, buns, rolls, & tortillas. V HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 American Speedy Printing, 417 Tesconi Cir., # 16, Santa Rosa, CA 95401, 707-575- 9334, fax 575-9882. Full service printing, high volume copying, graphics binding. binding. Also serving the needs of in- cominconventions & groups. Elizabei J. Desmond, CPA, 707-585-3423. Individual & Small Business Taxes and Accounting. la Tortilla Factory, Santa Rosa, 707-586-4000. A Sonoma County, favorite for 20 yyears. Makers of fine Mexican Tood products including fat free tortillas & fresh salsa. O'Dell Printing Co., Inc., 5460 State Farm Dr., # 14, Rohnert Park, CA 94928, 707- 585-2718. Commercial printing. Office Helper Products Inc., 1330 Ross St., Petaluma, CA . 800-867-4963, fax 800-933- 7964. Discount office products. Next day deliveries to Sonoma, Marin, Napa Counties. Service and price second to none. Petite Vines, 766 Westside Rd., Healdsburg, CA 95448, 707-433-6255. Wine grape varietals miniaturized via bonsai techniques. Most wine varieties available. Range of sizes & prices. Plant sales &leasing. Shopping The Classic Duck, 532 Coddingtown Mall (Hwy. 101 at Steele Ln.), Santa Rosa, CA 95401, 707-575-0755. Collectibles, gifts, home access. Heritage Village, Swarovski, Kinkade. Voted best gift shop on the North Coastl The Creamery Store, 711 Western, Petaluma, CA 94952, 707-778-1234, 800- 308-8666. Cow Motif Gifts, award winning cheese. Open Mon -Fri 9-5, Sat 10-5. Michael's Harley-Davidson, 4780 Sonoma Hwy Santa Rosa, CA 95409, 707-539-5560, 800-400-2011. A large selection of motorclothes, T-shirts and leathers. Petaluma Village Premium Outlets, Premium Outlet Shopping, 2200 Petaluma Blvd. N., Petaluma, 94952, 707-778-9300. Save 25-65% off I st quality, current season merchandise. Over 50 outlets incl Off 5th Saks Fifth Avenue Outlet and the Food Court. Ren Brown Collection, 1781 Hwy 1, Bodega Bay, CA 94923, 707-875-2922. Contemporar Japanese prints, regional art &apanese antiques in a serene setting. Woodblocks, etch- ings, sculpture, ceramics & jewelry. Santa Rosa Plaza, 1071 Santa Rosa Plaza, Santa Rosa, CA 95401, (707) 575- 01 1 S. The finest selection of stores in the North Bayl Located off Highway 101 at the downtown exit in Santa Rosa. Free valet Warking Mon -Sat from Spm—I Opm. hisllestop Antiques, 130 4th St., Hwy. 101, Downtown Santa Rosa Exit, 2nd left, 707-542-9474. Largest collective in Antique Row." Historic Railroad Square. Great shop for any collector. Open daily. Wine Country RV Superstore, 5701 Redwood Dr., Rohnert Park, (707) 585-7895. Complete source for parts, accessories, furnishings and service. Good Sam and RV Club Mem- bers receive 10% off merchandise. Spa/Fitness/Relaxation Experiences The Flamingo Resort Hotel, 4th & Farmers Ln., Santa Rosa, 707-545-8530. A light, airy aerobics room, Cybex Eagle weight training equipment, tennis courts, steam rooms, full line of cardiovascular training equipment, Swedish Esalen massage and more. A Simple Touch Spa, 239C Center St., Healdsburg, CA 95448, 707-433-6856. Full da spa, herb wraps, mud, massage, facials. Dr. Wilkinson's Hot Springs & Spa, 121507 Lincoln Ave., Calistoga, CA 94515, 707-942-4102. Natural relaxation mud baths, mineral baths, massage, facial salon, and 3 mineral Pools. Osmosis Enzyme Bath & Massage, 209 Bohemian Hwy Freestone, CA 95472, 707-823-8231. Featurin a unique) warm and Fra rant Japanese Enzyme Bath! Follow with a relaxing massage in our pagodas. Beautiful gardensl Therapeutic Massage & Facial Center, Doubletree Plaza, Rohnert Park, 707 584-0433. Massages, facials, spa treatments, combina- tion packages. Aromatherapy, peaceful atmosphere. Special Attractions Kozlowski Farms, "Sonoma County Classics," 5566 Gravenstein Hwy. (H 1 16), Forestville, CA 95437 707-887-1587. Gift store & Tasting room. Sample jams, salad dressings, much more.! Deli/ bakery, picnic area. Organic apples/berries in season. 9-5 daily. Marine World Africa DSA, Marine World Pkwy, Vallejo, CA 94589, 707-664-4000. San Francisco's Premier Familyy Attraction. 160 -acre wildrife park/ oceanarium. Showcases animals of land, sea, and air in spectacular shows and innovative habitats. Napa Valley Wine Train, 1275 McKinstr St., Napa, CA 94559, 707-523-21 I I, 800- 427-4124. Gourmet dining/rail excursion thru scenic Napa Valley. Brunch, lunch, dinner trains. Individuals & groups. Northwestern Pacific Railroad, 800-550-2122 or 888-473- 3966. Experience magnificent forests and canyons along the Russian River asyou journey by rail through Sonoma and Mendocino Wine Country. Gourmet food. Individuals and groups. Pet -A -Llama Ranch, 823-9395, offers fun for the whole familyl Pet and feed Llamas, then browse our gift shop. Open Sat/Sun 10am-4pm, some holidays and wkdys by appt. Petaluma Queen Riverboat Cruises, 255 Weller St., Petaluma, CA 94952, 800-750-7501, 707- 762-2100. Lunch, brunch, dinner. Group/charter rates for private celebrations, company earties, meetings. Petrified Forest, 4100 Petrified Forest Rd., Calistoga, CA 945 I S, 707-942- 6667. Giant petrified trees. Museum, gift shop, picnic. Open dail I Oam to Spm. Sears Point Raceway, Hwys. 37 & 121.800/870 -RACE. Located 40 minutes north of SF offering a unique setting for corporate meetings and incentive team buildling activities. Also host tom or racing events such as NASCAR and NHRA. Call for schedule. Sonoma Cheese Factory, 2 Spain St., "On the Plaza", Sonoma, CA 95476. 707-996- 19.31, 800-535-2855. Home of Sonoma lack Cheese. Watch cheese being made, plus tasting. Full deli. Sonoma County Fair & Exposition, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa, CA 95404, 707-545-4200. County fair July 22nd thru August 4. Features horse racing, exhibit halls, golf courses. Sonoma County Harvest Fair, 1350 Bennett Valley Rd., Santa Rosa, CA 95404, 707-545-4203. October 3-5, 1997. Old West Adventures, Wine Country by Wagons, PO. Box 1989, Danville, CA 94526, Toll Free: 0-500-679- 4093 (pin no. 1234#). Tour the wine country by horse drawn wagons through picturesque vineyards in the heart of Sonoma County. 7r HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 Wine Country Carriages, 3325 Hwy. 116 N., Sebastopol, CA 95472, 707-823-7083. Delightful 19th Century touring, real horsepower, gourmet picnic, couples4S0, famiy-$70, group -call. Wine Country Wagons, Kenwood, 707-833-1202. Carriages and Trolley Wagons pulled by Belgian Draft Horses. Custom party packages, your place or ours. Sonoma County history viticulture and winemaking guides. Tour Companies A Taste of California, 527 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa, CA 95401, 707 -57S - 914S/808 -385-2680. Distinctive Area Tours, Specialists in Incentive Marketing, Full Service provided, including airport pick- up in customized motor coach! California Rivers, 707-838-8919 or 579-2209. Kayak tours on calm waters with scenic views, abundant wildlife. Also personalized vehicle tours of wineries, backroads, uniQue shops and more. We specialize in "different places". California Wine Tours, "A full service transportation company," 707-939-7225, 800- 294-6386. Serving Sonoma & Napa Counties. A wine tour company using limousines to tour & taste. A 5 -hour limousine package is as low as $39/ person. Pick up at most hotels. Eagle Enterprises Custom Tours, 2777 Yulupa Ave. #214, Santa Rosa, CA 95405, 707-546- 9778, fax: 707-546-9778. Exclusive, private customized Wine Country tours for groups of 4 or more. A Tour Worth Remembering! Gray Line Tours, 350 8th St. S.F. 94103. Call 800-826-0202. Full, half-day tours of Bay Area, Wine Country, Monterey, & more! Overnight packages, charters available. Lon's Limo Scene, 707-539-5466, 800 TASTING. A beautiful and personal excursion of Sonoma and Napa. Oldest limosine service in area. Lon has 50years residency in the wine country. Exclusive and private. Tour de Yine - Wine Country Tours, P. O. Box 2098, Healdsburg, CA 95448, 800-433-8680, 707- 431-1388. Escorted Wine Country tours of Northern Sonoma County valleys. www.winetour.com Western Charter Tours, P.O. Box 456, Petaluma, CA 94953, 707-763-681 S. Charter & Tour coach transportation for local service and throughout the western states. Wine Country Jeep Tours, 800-539-5337. Experience the wine country in an open air jeep. Our professional drivers are well versed in the region. Backroad and off-road scenic tours for 2 to 20 people. Coastal, vineyard, redwood and evening rides. Transportation Airport Express, 5807 Old Redwood Hwy., Santa Rosa, CA 95403, 707-837- 8700, 800-327-2024. 21 trips daily to and from SFO. Bay Area Rentals, 3264 Santa Rosa Ave., Santa Rosa, CA 95407, 707-575- 1600, 707-763-2900, 707-996-1167. Car, truck, van rentals. Specializing in 15 passenger vans, camera trucks and cargo vans. Open 7 days/week. Hertz Reol-a-Car, 2241 Airport Blvd., Santa Rosa, CA 95403, 707-528-0834, 800-654-3131, fax 707-528- 2178- A full service agency located at Sonoma County Airport. Open 7days/week. Marin Charter & Tours, 8 Lovell Ave., San Rafael, CA 94901, 415-256-8830. Providing excellent ground transportation services since 1975. Our Fleet of MCI 102's can handle allyour needs while in the SF Bay area and the west coast. Pure Luxury Limousine & Transportation Service, Inc., 800-626-5466. Fantastic private Wine Country tours, airport trans- portation, dinner packages, weddings, any size group. All credit cards. Santa Rosa Airporter, 800-228-8015, 707-545-8015. Eighteen departures daily to San Francisco and Oakland Airports - New modern deluxe coaches/ Santa Rosa Airporter. Deluxe European style coaches for charter/Santa Rosa Charters. Style'R Comfort Limousine, 800-487-5466. Providing Superior 24 -hr service, airport/hotel. Custom: wine, dinner, wedding packages, since 1984. Major credit cards accepted. WEDDING SITES/ SERVICES Beautiful Wedding Ceremonies, Rev. F. Dodson, Minister, Non -denominational. 707-584-7509. Traditional or personalized wedding ceremonies at the location ofyour choice. You'll find that I'm prompt, reliable, caring and professional. Calla, 630 Fifth St., Santa Rosa, CA 9S404, 707-523-1265, 800- 972-2552. Award winning European flowershop featuring the highest Quality Flowers for weddings, parties, conventions, corporate events. Full gift and art gallery. Compass Rose Gardens, P O. Box 1060, Bodega Bay, CA 94923, 707-875-2343. Special events, weddings. A coastal paradise. Beautiful, magical gardens w/creek. Sonoma County's fantasy weddings. Depot Rotel Restaurant & Italian Garden, 241 1 st St. W., Sonoma, 707- 938-2980, 800-200-2980. Beautiful, Italian garden w/reflect. pool, romantic "Country Inn" style. Award winning cuisine. Fountain Bleu Estates, 10017 Cherry Ridge Rd., Sebastopol, CA 95472, 707-823- 7755. An elegant country estate, 10 acres of privacy. 4 beautiful guest rooms, luxurious master suite, weddings and special events for 200. Madrona Manor, 1001 Westside Rd., Healdsburg, CA 95448, 707-433-423 I. Elegant, storybook wedding location in a luxurious Victorian mansion. 8 acres of gardens. Mary Ellen Murphy & Assoc., 19229 Sonoma Hwy. # 151, Sonoma, CA 95476, 707-939- 1554, fax 707-939-7556. A personalized approach to wedding planning. Unique locations, elegant wineries, estates, private residences, and B&B's. No detail goes unattended. Petaluma Queen Riverboat Wedding Cruises, 255 Weller St., 707-762-2100. The most romantic and memorable venue foryour ceremony. 4 hour exclusive cruise foryour magic day. Peter & Lesley Stein Photography, 707-967-9419, 415-388-0847, fax 707-967-0848. Our photo studio offers personally customized services, featuring weddings, portraiture, corporate events and commercial assignments in black & white and color film. Ray Ballar Photography, P.O. Box 2965, Santa Rosa, CA 95405. 707-578-9300. We photograph corporate events, weddings, golf tournaments & conventions. Also executive & family portraiture. e-mail:rbaltar@sonic.net. http:// www.sonic.net/bartarphoto Selix Formal Wear, 800-SELIXTUX or 707-575-3212. Selix and our authorized dealers rent and sell formal wear at over 100 locations in California and Nevada. Ir HOTLINE: 707-586-8100 I 10 ® CUA SI cnut� eoc s Just a w from the historic Sonoma Plaza. • Free Trolley Rides • Guided Tours • Tasting • Gift Shop • Picnic Area • Free Parking Take our free shuttle to and from Sonoma Plaza and Sehastiani Sonoma Cask Cellars Open daily 10 am to 5 pm • 389 Fourth Street East Sonoma, CA 95476 (707) 938-5532 The American Express® Card is warmly welcomed at fine establishments - throughout Sonoma County, such a,,- Sebastiani Sonoma Cask Cellar.. I)hoto: Ed Cooper Sonoma County Convention & Visitors Bureau 5000 Roberts Lake Road, Suite A Rohnert Park, CA 94928 (707) 586-8100 Fax: (707) 586-81 1 1 http://www.visitsonoma.com/ email: sccvb@visitsonoma.com BULK RATE U.S. Postage PAID Santa Ana, CA Permit # 1866 A short drive off Highway 12 leads to the Kenwood Vmeyard and Winery. The heart of the winery is its tasting room, home of the friendliest wine hosts to be found anywhere. rl%— " - Like many wineries, Kenwood's tasting room tam is carefiilly selected for general wine In are c 1W Kenwood Winery keeps in touch with its fi=is, new and old, with timely newsletters filled with information of new releases, case discount sales, wine MMOM ' and food pairings and special events. . knowledge, product information, and — — — — fanuliarity with the surrounding attractions. But at ' = `' `` Kenwood,thereisanotherstrongcarditionofempkyr t Kenwood addition to knowledge, Kenwood tasting room hosts =t hme)m wit the Am hosen for their natural, fi-iendly ease with people. be sure to visit the u4�• Tasting room open daily 10:00 am to 4:30 pm • 9592 Highway 12 9 Kenwood 0 (707)-833-5891 rte.. .. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Copy to ea. Councilman 6750 Commerce Blvd. Copy to 6 . i / Tel: 707/793-7226 copyto io-it-97�G Fax: 707/793-7274 FACT SHEET FOR CITY COUNCIL APPOINTMEMCM10 COMMMIONS, BOARDS, OR COMMITTEES Date: /O- !.S - 9 '7 Name: tiNR /-I S Residence Telephone: Address: L/-7 si =tel uiiy Business Telephone: 6 - x/77 S27 Employer: C 0ae,i i -y OF SC,vC Address: 5X lri.Se,4 c /-).t' S "q iv 'Tip! !';o 5,1 C R 951 o 3 Type of Business: C-DVEi?wh,r��:7- Specif 1C work performed: D! TT- / / T - Year graduated from high school: tg6O Degrees: !35th -C' -PA Are you a current registered voter in Rohnert Park? Yes ✓ No Year you became a Rohnert Park resident: 077 -5 - List activities in clubs, associations, etc. pieraye- z�Cxs �r C}I�ts aue of GF a# a4"e Cala :w•,c� G= ,� /.?F C%c��i'tr'� ,�'c �� � � � �,+�F.?�. A.yG��'� cam/ ,tJ iNS r� rll T� c'/� �s9 's ,. TO WHICH BODY DO YOU PREFER APPOINTMENT? (Commission, Board, or Committee) pC,-/T C'E�/�irC�L /��A'L'FA L S '6GARJi Indicate reasons for your interest in appointment: Tr i N �' sC`GZ' f,y' C` C` . t'77 Az,� .-/ 5 � C.�(ic'c�•�'..c/�i Please provide any additional information, qualifications, and/or references if you so desire. You may use other side of this form. (Form approved by City Council -3/5/75) Signature PLEASE RETURN TO CITY MANAGER'S OFFICE Address: (��r �C rl 1`��i i�� �� Business Telephone: �.7_ ,` i Employer: C-Cwtn� L c-. Address: .2 P/<_«.1 ct—) Type of Business: Specific work performed: LLS Co- r-�q CD Mk t -f- C Year graduated from high school : 1g-7-� Degrees: ;L2 • 0- _ _t_r,-,� Are you a current registered voter in Rohnert Park? Yes x No Year you became a Rohnert Park resident: 199 List activities in clubs, associations, etc. a rt (' P_ 1 C' "� 1 r CSC- ��l1 l ' C . � 4:o-i\rli e-L(�,rrS LCA i ft, K: C'1 -9L �C"�, C ,�T�1"ifi `� t�LS C, .SC r :S f}- I�`fzt(L��'11LL C l {Z l�l'.��G_'� C-17 l -'XU 1 ��c��cl` _i c -til fdu-- C}S », +QQn-r'1, �4 7 ricU� c�Z��c�t✓ TO WHICH BODY DO YOU PREFER APPOINTMENT? (Commission, Board, or Committee) Indicate reasons for your interest in appointment: C�{nr`rr�c.ra� r�S ric'h� L'c rvT- L S l 1 \�iL L t ►- \ 'LV it 1"11 i C- - Lr L7., ci� .CL Ef 0 t 0-1C-Lvl+ZLl1 L -t%' �� L.rl- f'� C�L� w i`vcL� lcS CL`t � 6�C{Z'� yL C�C Please provide any additional information, qualifications, and/or references if you so desire. You may use other side of this form. - .,1 �c( LO,c� c`tiICT ��C 11C }yam nc`ti-� UA �1� 01, l`'� �C1Sf ; LQ CL ►'llCA-0 �'lc111C 01 17 `t (c . �f��-�— Cs- C�:�� (- , tlLc rPC 1��CC kc�v' L �ctt' K ; t, t r G CLCl LL Cr YU S i C�s'll• LS S L LAS ( , ►'�1vC c ` C S , tS47 L►IQ v ( U 12J11 -C`; C� L\ c ct` iLL` cur , T Ci C V\CLv Q— C` C cC' cF u+ cls c's�c`n L z r d Ll 9�. c' 1-,2 CL L U -Ie C4 L -C T C A � s c�11 irti� �cLr tZC �?c cit �2c� ILCr\ L` r cl �$,r }�cL L"q"-CL1V,CS� -T- "k- � C� ►' c' l_� tC t� L 1. -\,c L OLp e"t r !_ c_� 0-1 i- c�.� c� e� \tu C- ' 6. -&A- , -ck c� c�' ��� lc 1 ct_ C 1.0 f tri z — r)" -C �INtc�vuc L_OA c_v- ��isi `y� p (t c PC c►� cII� �lLc— rcL�{1t01Q-C , i tcK� CLt rIV <��►- i —' l.Cu'LC_ ( Form approved by CAy Council -3/5/75) Signature PLEASE RETURN TO CITY MANAGER'S OFFICE Council CorrespondoW ►� rA CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Copy to so. COA 6750 Commerce Blvd. COPV104 -� ty97 Tel: 707/793-7226 Fax: 707/793-7274 FACT SHEET FOR CITY COUNCIL APPOINTMEN i PARK COMMISSIONS, BOARDS, OR COMMITTEE Date: -j 'i Name: �C;� 11C'����►��— Residence Telephone: -7 r Address: (��r �C rl 1`��i i�� �� Business Telephone: �.7_ ,` i Employer: C-Cwtn� L c-. Address: .2 P/<_«.1 ct—) Type of Business: Specific work performed: LLS Co- r-�q CD Mk t -f- C Year graduated from high school : 1g-7-� Degrees: ;L2 • 0- _ _t_r,-,� Are you a current registered voter in Rohnert Park? Yes x No Year you became a Rohnert Park resident: 199 List activities in clubs, associations, etc. a rt (' P_ 1 C' "� 1 r CSC- ��l1 l ' C . � 4:o-i\rli e-L(�,rrS LCA i ft, K: C'1 -9L �C"�, C ,�T�1"ifi `� t�LS C, .SC r :S f}- I�`fzt(L��'11LL C l {Z l�l'.��G_'� C-17 l -'XU 1 ��c��cl` _i c -til fdu-- C}S », +QQn-r'1, �4 7 ricU� c�Z��c�t✓ TO WHICH BODY DO YOU PREFER APPOINTMENT? (Commission, Board, or Committee) Indicate reasons for your interest in appointment: C�{nr`rr�c.ra� r�S ric'h� L'c rvT- L S l 1 \�iL L t ►- \ 'LV it 1"11 i C- - Lr L7., ci� .CL Ef 0 t 0-1C-Lvl+ZLl1 L -t%' �� L.rl- f'� C�L� w i`vcL� lcS CL`t � 6�C{Z'� yL C�C Please provide any additional information, qualifications, and/or references if you so desire. You may use other side of this form. - .,1 �c( LO,c� c`tiICT ��C 11C }yam nc`ti-� UA �1� 01, l`'� �C1Sf ; LQ CL ►'llCA-0 �'lc111C 01 17 `t (c . �f��-�— Cs- C�:�� (- , tlLc rPC 1��CC kc�v' L �ctt' K ; t, t r G CLCl LL Cr YU S i C�s'll• LS S L LAS ( , ►'�1vC c ` C S , tS47 L►IQ v ( U 12J11 -C`; C� L\ c ct` iLL` cur , T Ci C V\CLv Q— C` C cC' cF u+ cls c's�c`n L z r d Ll 9�. c' 1-,2 CL L U -Ie C4 L -C T C A � s c�11 irti� �cLr tZC �?c cit �2c� ILCr\ L` r cl �$,r }�cL L"q"-CL1V,CS� -T- "k- � C� ►' c' l_� tC t� L 1. -\,c L OLp e"t r !_ c_� 0-1 i- c�.� c� e� \tu C- ' 6. -&A- , -ck c� c�' ��� lc 1 ct_ C 1.0 f tri z — r)" -C �INtc�vuc L_OA c_v- ��isi `y� p (t c PC c►� cII� �lLc— rcL�{1t01Q-C , i tcK� CLt rIV <��►- i —' l.Cu'LC_ ( Form approved by CAy Council -3/5/75) Signature PLEASE RETURN TO CITY MANAGER'S OFFICE I FAX transmittal DATE: July 9, 1997 TO: COMMUNITY VOICE ATTN: Jean Cooney, Legals �® Jud Snyder, Editor Phone: Fax Phone: 584-2233 Number of pages including cover sheet: 2 FROM: Judy Hauff, Deputy City Clerk City of Rohnert Park Administrative Offices 6750 Commerce Boulevard Rohnert Park, CA 94928 Phone: (707) 793-7226 Fax Phone: (707) 793-7274 CC: City Councilmembers RE: Mobile Home Parks Joseph D. -Netter, City Manager Rent Appeals Board Diane Tomkins, RAB Rep. . - VACANCY - REMARKS: JEAN: PLEASE PUBLISH THE FOLLOWING PUBLIC NOTICE IN THE NEXT EDITION OF THE COMMUNITY VOICE. JUD: IF SPACE IS AVAILABLE, A SHORT ARTICLE WOULD BE APPRECIATED. jhfc.*M. tivmhrab .Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman Copy to Copy to Copy to CITY OF ROHNERT PARK 6750 COMMERCE BLVD. ROHNERT PARK, CA 94928 TEL: 7071793-7227 FAX: 7071793-7274 PUBLIC NOTICE MAYOR LINDA SPIRO IS SEEKING APPLICANTS TO NOMINATE FOR THE CURRENT VACANCY ON THE CITY'S MOBILE HOME PARKS RENT APPEALS BOARD FOR A TWO YEAR TERM WHICH EXPIRES ON DECEMBER 31,1997. THE RENT APPEALS BOARD MEETS THE IST THURSDAY OF EACH MONTH AT 7:00 P.M. AT THE CITY OFFICES, 6750 COMMERCE BLVD., ROHNERT PARK, CA. A MAJOR FUNCTION OF THE RENT APPEALS BOARD IS TO ADMINISTER ORDINANCE NO. 494, THE MOBILE HOME RENT CONTROL ORDINANCE, FOR THE FIVE (5) MOBILE HOME PARKS IN THE CITY. PERSONS INTERESTED IN APPLYING MAY CONTACT THE CITY MANAGER'S OFFICE BY TELEPHONING 793-7226 TO REQUEST AN APPLICATION OR MAY PICK ONE UP AT THE CITY OFFICES. DATED: JULY 9, 1997 FAX: COMMUNITY VOICE Jean Cooney, Legals Jud Snyder, Editor POST: (1) City Hall (2) Recreation Dept. (3) Public Safety cc: City Councilmembers Joseph D. Netter, City Manager ..Diane Tomkins, RAB Rep. . jwc.—Mla� 2, 8] 41 51 0 I A ON _rW N Cr o R®hnert Park Department ®f Public Safely - —._ _ Committed to Training and Excellence Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councs;,-nan o Training Pr®gramCopyto • Police Services [In-Nousel Copy to • Fire Services [In -House) Copy to • Outslde Training Programs • Educational opportunities and incentives O Summary of Training Program • Approximately 480 hours per year of in-house training offered • The Department is divided into -two training groups • One-half of training offered is Police Services oriented, one-half is Fire Service Oriented 0 Training per year per Officer, • 120 hours of Police Oriented Training • 120 hours of Fire Oriented Training • Outside Specialized Training • Educational Opportunities and Incentives Q Council Presentation for October 20,1997 Police Oriented Training Program O POST Certificates Available • Basic POST Certificate (PSOs) • Intermediate POST Certificate (PSOs) • Advanced POST Certificate (PSOs & Sgt.) • Supervisory POST Certificate (Sgt. & Lt.): • Management POST Certificate (Lt. & Comdr.) • Executive POST Certificate (Comdr. & Director O BASIC POST CERTIFICATE • Currently employed as a full time peace officer- • Satisfactorily complete a basic POST academy . • 'Satisfactorily complete a minimum one year probationary period with a law enforcement agency O INTERMEDIATE POST CERTIFICATE • Possess a Basic POST certificate 0 10 11 121 131 141 15 16 ADVANCED POST CERTIFICATE • Possess Basic and Intermediate POST Certificates O SUPERVISORY POST CERTIFICATE • Possess Intermediate Certificate • Receive a minimum of 60 semester units from an accredited College • Satisfactorily complete 80 hour POST Supervisory course • Successfully serve a minimum of two years as a first line supervisor or higher position MANAGEMENT POST CERTIFICATE • Possess Advanced POST Certificate • Receive a minimum of 60 semester units from an accredited College • Satisfactorily complete 80 hour POST Management course • Successfully serve a minimum of two years as a middle manager or higher position i EXECUTIVE POST CERTIFICATE • Satisfactorily complete 80 hour POST Executive Development course • Successfully serve a minimum of two years as an Agency/Department Head POST MANDATORY ON-GOING TRAINING • Basic First Aid/CPR - Four hours annually • Domestic Violence - Two hours bi-annually • Haz-Mat Awareness - Four hours annually 1i DEPARTMENTAL MANDATORY TRAINING • First Responder Medical Aid - 24 hours bi-annually • Domestic Violence - four hours annually • Haz-Mat First Responder - 24 hours annually POST RECOMMENDED ON-GOING TRAINING • Use of force - annually • Firearms Qualification - semi annual • Pursuit Driving - annually • Sexual Harassment - bi annual • Internal Affairs - annual DEPARTMENT PROVIDED ON-GOING TRAINING • Use of force - quarterly • Firearms qualification - quarterly 17 18 19 20' 21' 221 23 24 • Pursuit Driving - semi annually a Council Presentation for October 28,1997 Fire Service Oriented Training Program O Fire Service Certifications • Basic Recruit • State Fire Fighter I • State Fire Fighter II • Fire Officer • Chief Officer • Fire Chief D Basic Recruit • Complete in-house academy or certified Firefighter One academy • Complete in-house orientation program D Firefighter I Certificate • Complete Firefighter I academy and courseware • Complete six month service as paid Firefighter or one year as volunteer Firefighter D Firefighter II Certificate • Possess Firefighter I certificate • Complete Firefighter II course as developed by local agency • Complete one year of service as paid Firefighter or two years as a volunteer D Fire Officer Certification • Possess Firefighter II certificate • Complete Fire Officer coursework of identified classes • Complete two years of service D Chief Officer Certificate • Possess Fire Officer Certificate • Complete the Chief Officer coursework of approved classes • Minimum of five years of service as a Fire Officer O Fire Chief Certificate. Process in development at this lime, will include • Position as Chief Officer for 2 years • Completion of coursework as approved by State Board of Fire Services • Peer review of application • Oral interview and examination 25 26 E 10 BASIC FIRE ACADEMY SUBJECTS U • Fire Service Organization • Fire Behavior and Science • Personal Safety Equipment • Portable Extinguishers • Ropes and Knots • Fire Hoses, Appliances, Advances & Streams • Ladders • Forcible Entry • Search and Rescue Techniques and Tactics • Ventilation • Fire Control, Strategy and Tactics • Salvage and Overhaul • Hazardous Materials • Vehicle Rescue and Extrication 271(1)Course Instructors • Sonoma County Office of Emergency Services, Training Division • In-house instructors • Contract Instructors with specialized areas of knowledge ROHNERT PARI COMMUNITY SUMMIT October 169-17, 18, 1997 Toe N. Council Correspondence Copy to ea. CouncAman Copy to Copy to Copy to .Initial Task Force Purpose Statements Transportation Our mission is to identify issues and offer solutions that encompass multi -modal system on near, mid, and long term basis sensitive to practical financial reality. Major Issues: Light rail, heavy rail, autos, bikes, fiscal issues, discuss the 101, pedestrian, traffic signals—specific locations, busses, transportation center, philosophical (ban all cars, keep people at home, telecommuting, electrical cars, 101 widening). Vision Statement: Rohnert Park provides and maintains an environmentally sound multi -modal transportation system. Economic Vitality, BudLret, and Preservintl Services Our mission is to make Rohnert Park economically viable in an environmentally friendly setting while increasing existing revenue sources and promoting new business and industry. Our purpose is to outline procedures that will advance the next cash flow to the city. Major Issues: (A) Economic Vitality: high tech, retail/business, tourism/sports/arts/entertainment, taxes, education, jobs/employment, and ''new businesses. (B) Budget: revenue and expenditures and system to achieve. . (C)' Services: fire, police, cemetery, volunteerism, recycling, crime and youth services, Shared/Joint services (with other cities), arts and entertainment, emergency systems. Vision Statement: Welcome to Rohnert Park a city that has a streamlined City Permit Process with lands available that are appropriate zoned, a fully staffed fire and public service embracing a partnership with SSU (land and Students) and surrounding communities and the county, enjoying existing open/empty space, with - 1 - Printed: 10/18/97 Rohnert Park Community Summit an inclusive economic plan, revitalized older areas, 1ligher paying jobs, all of which allow you to play, work, and live in the same community with nicer restaurants, upscale hotel and motels., diversity in business and community, including a convention center and regional recreational area which supports the arts. Housin_2 Our mission is to identify and plan for housing needs in Rohnert Park over the next 20 years. Major Issues: SSU Student and faculty housing, affordable housing, senior housing, planning and design, ABAG requirements, rental, mobile home, external factors such as market issues and ABAG requirement, policy integration , with transportation, boundaries and infrastructure task forces, cost mix —upscale, codes and infrastructure, and renewal existing homes/neighborhoods. Vision Statement: Rohnert Park has a diverse mix of quality housing meeting market demands for rental properties and home ownership. Infrastructure Our mission is to identify infrastructure issues; evaluate issue problem areas; recommend solutions; identify options; and evaluate pros/cons. Major Issues: Waste Water, Water supply use and quality, sewer/sanitary, Funding (grants), . flood protection, utility distribution and collection, storm drainage collection system, Cannon Manor Annexation, Parks, golf courses, open space, information highway, public buildings: city hall, library, fire station, roads and bike paths. Vision Statement: An infrastructure program that will permit land and managed growth. Town Center Our mission is to: (1) Define the concept of a town center "appropriate" to Rohnert Park, (2) Develop suggested elements and (3) identify potential sites Major Issues: Concept, elements and sites. - 2 - Printed: 10/18/97 Rohnert Park Community Summit Vision Statement: Rohnert Park's town center will be unique gathering place of public pride. Definition: Rohnert Park's Town Center is a gathering place that may consist of multiple interconnected sites for diversified use. These sites will be pedestrian friendly, architecturally unique and serve as a conduit for the rest of the community. Education Our mission is to explore, identify, and work with the current K-12 educational system to develop recommendations for future expansion and development using community resources Major Issues: Class size, accountability, public relations, facilities, governance, year around school, adult education, teachers, uniforms, public relations, facilities, partnership, resources, programming, quality and new high schools facilities). Vision Statement: Rohnert Park offers a superior education that provides essential skills incorporates modern technology and use of community resources to allow all students to reach their highest potential and enter the work force, college, or vocational/technical schools. Boundary Issues Our mission is to create a process to be able to evaluate the ramifications of boundaries and to establish a framework for making decisions. Major Issue: Growth and non -growth issues, green belt and open space, and process. Vision Statement: Rohnert Park is the number one city on the list of most livable cities with a flexible boundary policy that provide for open. space, housing, transportation, economic vitality, infrastructure, tourism and recreation. Youth Our mission is to develop specific plans to benefit our youth community. Major Issues: Recreation center, positive activities, funding issues, substance abuse, counseling, youth and community input, mentoring/employment, volunteer, after school link services, law, family .education - 3 - Printed: 10/18/97 Rohnert Park Community Summit Vision Statement: Nationally recognized as the most desirable city for youth and families. Rohnert Park offers the highest quality program and services for the changing and diverse needs of the community. Tourism Our mission is to identify the types of tourism we want to attract and plan a strategy for successful implementation. Major Issues: Sports and recreation, cultural areas, hotels and bed and breakfast, food and wine, specialty events, marketing and image, convention center. Vision Statement: Rohnert Park is an attractive tourist destination providing visitors with a range of quality food and lodging choices and diverse opportunities to enjoy sports, recreation, wine and cultural activities and events. Next Stens Our mission is to establish the system for continuing the work begun at the summit and for processing the goals and purposes of the task forces with maximum citizen involvement. Major issues: How to keep groups together, gain maximum community involvement, enthusiasm and motivation, time lines, encourage minority viewpoints, feedback (monitoring and reporting), reduce redundancies, fund/staffing, public/private partnerships, integrated decision making process, evaluation process (consistency and validation) decision making process, gathering and dissimulating information, know when it is time to let go, state of the summit report, system for checks and balances. Vision Statement: Rohnert Park embraces an innovative, progressive, formal process that captures new ideas and local issues by maximizing broad citizen involvement and offering a fair, balanced resolution to those ideas and issues. - 4 - Printed: 10/18/97 City: of:S.ohnert;Park October 23, 1997 city;Gonncil Robert & Carol Sissa, Jr. Joseph D. Netter Cite Manager 6750 Commerce Blvd. Rohnert Park, CA 94928-2486 Phone: 707!793-7226 FAX: 707/793-7274 If your swine farm actually comes to fruition, the following suggestions could be a great marketing tool for both your operation and the City. In place of the former Crane Melon Festival, we could have: The Rohnert Pork Swine & Dine Festival Event for children/community might be Old-fashioned Greased Pig Contest called the Rohnert Porky Pig Race Mud wrestling with a Pig Sporting event between the "Squealers" and the "Porkers" Country dance called a "slop hop" Hog calling Contest BBQ'd Rib Cook -off Prizes could be, referred to as "bringing home the bacon" Advertising posters similar to Clover the Cow only ours would use a Pig i.e. the Wine & Swine Visitors' Center I'm interested.in your thoughts on the subject. Very truly yours, CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Linda Spiro Mayor PS While we're on the topic, here are some other humorous ideas: Baseball team name change from Crushers to Oinkers New Theater: Pig -O -Rama Wastewater rafting down the Creek Rohnert Park: The County Ham Pig -out Deli & Snort Bar 172 Fescue Way Rohnert Pork, CA 94928 Linda Spiro Mayor Re: 4948 Snyder Lane Pig Farm Vicki Vidak-Martinez Vice Mayor Armando F Flores Dear Bob and Carol, Council Member Jake Mackenzie As you know, last weekend the City of Rohnert Park had a Community Summit meeting. Council Member During the meeting, some interesting comments - which may seem a bit crazy - came out in reference to your pig operation. However, sometimes the craziest ideas blossom into great James J. Reilly, JR. Council Memeber ideas. Joseph D. Netter Cite Manager 6750 Commerce Blvd. Rohnert Park, CA 94928-2486 Phone: 707!793-7226 FAX: 707/793-7274 If your swine farm actually comes to fruition, the following suggestions could be a great marketing tool for both your operation and the City. In place of the former Crane Melon Festival, we could have: The Rohnert Pork Swine & Dine Festival Event for children/community might be Old-fashioned Greased Pig Contest called the Rohnert Porky Pig Race Mud wrestling with a Pig Sporting event between the "Squealers" and the "Porkers" Country dance called a "slop hop" Hog calling Contest BBQ'd Rib Cook -off Prizes could be, referred to as "bringing home the bacon" Advertising posters similar to Clover the Cow only ours would use a Pig i.e. the Wine & Swine Visitors' Center I'm interested.in your thoughts on the subject. Very truly yours, CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Linda Spiro Mayor PS While we're on the topic, here are some other humorous ideas: Baseball team name change from Crushers to Oinkers New Theater: Pig -O -Rama Wastewater rafting down the Creek Rohnert Park: The County Ham Pig -out Deli & Snort Bar CITY OF ROHNERT PARK COUNCIL AGENDA ITEM TRANSMITTAL REPORT Department: Recreation City Clerk Use Only Meeting Date Held Until Submitted By: James Pekkain 10/28/97 d'/ _/_/_ Item Number Item Number Agenda Title: SKATE PARK Date of Action: _/ / Deadline Date for Council Action:—/ / Requested Council Action: To support the Parks & Recreation Commission's recommendation to form a committee to review the various concerns expressed by the residents on developing a skate ark in Honeybee Park next to the basketball courts. Summary: The Commission held a public hearing on 10/20/97 on constructing a 5,000 square foot flat skate park in Honeybee Park. A staff report is attached to this report. Approximately 40 residents were in the audience. The Commission heard (18) residents' concerns. Heather Simmons from Healdsburg Skate Park Task Force offered assistance in developing the H -Park Skate Area. Out of the (18) residents who spoke, (16) were against the development of the skate park in H - Park. The residents were not against a skate parkas long as it was -not located in a neighborhood park next to a school. The Commission, after lengthy discussion, decided to form a committee comprised of the commission committee, Hahn school officials and PTA, skaters, Heather Simmons, residents -of H section and public safety to meet to discuss the residents' concerns and determine the feasibility of locating the skate area in H -Park. Staff hopes to have the initial meeting sometime during the week of 11/10. CITY MANAGER'S RECOMMENDATION: ( )Consent Item Regular Item ( ) Approval () Public Hearing Required ( ) Not Recommended () Submitted with Comment MPolicy Determination by Council City Comments: City Manager's Signature: J Date: Ld :_ (City Clerk Use Only) / Council Action (If Other than Requested) Vote: 10/22/97 JPP:STPRK.WPS INTER -OFFICE MEMO TO: Parks & Recreation Commission FROM: Jim Pekkain Recreation Dire SUBJECT: Staff Report -Skate Park in H -Park DATE: October 20, 1997 cc: Joe Netter, Bill Stevens, Pat Rooney, Joe Gaffney, Mary Hanlon & Guy Miller Public Hearing Notices Notices of the skate park public hearing were sent to all the residents in H section. In addition to the notice, 510 fliers were distributed through Hahn Elementary School and additional fliers were put up at the middle schools and high school. Location of Proposed Skate Park The proposed neighborhood skate area is to be located east of the existing basketball courts and west of the tennis courts. The skate area would be approximately 5,000 square feet. The preliminary design of the area consists of two three-foot high pyramids with three various shaped curbs ranging in height from one to two feet to accommodate skateboarders and in-line skaters. Rules and regulations as established by AB 1296 would be posted. The rules are as follows: 1. The skate park has to be located on public land. 2. Helmets, knee and elbow pads would be required. 3. Violation of the rules may result in a citation. Letters & Petition Received I have received (5) letters from residents unable to attend the meeting. Four opposed and one were in favor of the skate park. I also received a petition with (124) signatures opposed to the park because of the following reasons; close proximity to the homes, property adjacent to school, and the current problems in the park getting worse with a skate park. A survey was also taken. Copies have been submitted to the commission and I believe a resident will be giving a report on the study. Staffs Recommendation If the opposition is as overwhelming against the neighborhood skate area at the public hearing, then I recommend the commission consider a larger community skate park. Hire a consultant to plan the community skate park with the kids and appropriate staff along with a recommending a suitable location. Skate Park Survey Please return to Hahn PTA The city of Rohnert Park is considering building a skate park in Honeybee Park. It would be located in the grassy area next to the existing basketball courts. Hahn PTA would like to complete an opinion poll regarding this issue and provide the results to the city. Please complete and return this survey to Hahn PTA by Friday, Oct.17. We would like to tabulate the results over the weekend and present them to the Parks and Rec Commission at their Monday, Oct. 20th meeting. If you would like to attend this public hearing, it will be held at 7.00 P.M. in the City Council Chambers, 6750 Commerce Blvd. Each member of your family may complete a response, including students. Three survey forms are provided here. Additional copies are available at the school office. Thank you very much, Heidi Weil, Hahn PTA Co -Pres. 585-9683 Please respond to the following statement. by circling your answer : I am in favor of the City of Rohnert Park building a skate park in Honeybee Park. Strongly Somewhat Neutral Somewhat Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Agree Please tell us about yourself. What is your role in, the Hahn PTA? Student Parent Teacher/Staff Do you live in the immediate vicinity of Honeybee Park (Hudis St.,Helene Ct.,Haley Ct., Hacienda Circle, Hacienda Ct.)? Yes 1,4,�POLIER II E Hr�rl� PM �5U PVEj _-T _]/(k'E MEE 7-14G . W ff � Please respond to the following statement: by circling your answer: 1 am in favor of the City of Rohnert Park building a skate park in Honeybee Park. Strongly Somewhat Neutral Somewhat Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Agree Please tell us about yourself. What is your role in the Hahn PTA? Student Parent Teacher/Staff Do you live in the immediate vicinity of Honeybee Park (Hudis St.,Helene Ct.,Haiey Ct., Hacienda Circle, Hacienda Ct.)? Yes No Please respond to the following statement: by circling your answer: I am in favor of the City of Rohnert Park building a skate park in Honeybee Park. Strongly Somewhat Neutral Somewhat Strongly Disagree Disagree Agree Agree Please tell us about yourself. What is your role in the Hahn PTA? Student Parent- Teacher/Staff Do you live in the immediate vicinity of Honeybee Park (Hudis St.,Helene Ct.,Haley Ct., Hacienda Circle, Hacienda Ct.)? Yes No "1 am in favor of the City of Rohnert Park building a skate area at Honeybee Park." Hahn PTA Survey Done October 16 & 17,1997 _ Strongly Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Stronly Agree Total Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Percent Number Parent (By Park 31 73.8% 3 7.1%_ 3 7.1% 3 7.1% 2 4.8% 42 Parent Not by Park 67 40.6% 21 12.7% 19 11.5% 24 14.5% 34 20.6% 165 Student (By Park 19 67.9% 2 7.1%. 1 3.6% 2 7.1% 4 14.3% 28 Student Not by Park 25 33.3% 11 14.7% 13 17.3% 5 21 28.0% 75 Teacher/Staff (By Park 2 100.0% 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 0 _6.7% 0.0% 0 0.0% 2 Teacher/Staff Not by Park 9 81.8% 1 9.1% 1 9.1% 0 0.0% 0 0.0% 11 Total 153 47.4% 38 11.8% 37 11.5% 34 10.5% 61 18.9% 323 Skate Park Survey Comments Completed Oct. 16 and 17, 1997 Marguerite Hahn Elementary School PTA 'I live in the vicinity of the Santa Rosa Skate Park. I am ADAMANTLY opposed to this park.' 'We live in G section, closest to 'H'. I was opposed to this idea here and equally opposed in 'H'. This is a quiet comer of Rohnert Park, and I frankly don't see why they would stick a park all the way out here. I am against bringing the element skate parks attract to such a strongly family-oriented area.' 'A skate park would be wonderful for the kids, but I believe it should be located near the Public Safety Building and PAL or in the Sports Center complex area.' 'I am strongly in favor of the city building a skate park, but it needs to be away from any school and away from heavy residential areas. Why not an area, for example, on the west side of the freeway?' From a student: 'I'd like the skate park, but in another area, not near my school.' 'Build it by R.P. Public Safety in empty lot.' 'Put it at the Community Center/ Sports Facility.' 'The area for the skate park is very close to Hahn School, and I don't want my girls having to walk past the skate park to visit Honeybee Park and Pool.' 'Cotati is doing a skate park idea also- one is enough! 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% In Favor of Skate Area at H Park Hahn PTA Survey Strongly Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree EO All Respondents 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% In Favor of Skate Area at H Park Hahn PTA Survey Strongly Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree El Parent (By Park) 50.0 40.0° 30.0°/ 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% In Favor of Skate Area at H Park Hahn PTA Survey u, oumumat Agree Strongly Agree E3 Parent (Not by Park 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% In Favor of Skate Area at H Park Hahn PTA Survey Strongly Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Student (Not by Par k) 90.0% 80.0% 70.0% 60.0% 50.0% 40.0% 30.0% 20.0% 10.0% 0.0% In Favor of Skate Area at H Park Hahn PTA Survey Strongly Disagree Somewhat Disagree Neutral Somewhat Agree Strongly Agree Teacher/Staff REQUEST COMMISSION MEMBERS TO KINDLY PERUSE THE VARIOUS SKATEBOARD AS WELL AS IN-LINE SKATE MAGAZINES DURING MY PRESENTATION. BEFORE WE BEGIN OUR STATEMENT, WE WOULD LIKE TO POINT OUT TO THIS HONORABLE COMMISSION WE ARE NOT AGAINST IN-LINESKATE S OR SKATEBOARDERS. WE ARE CONCERNED PARENTS WHO WOULD LIKE TO SEE A CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT FOR A SKATE PARK AND NOT IN AN UNCONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT WHICH IS LOCATED IN A PUBLIC PARD NEAR AN AWARD-WINNING SCHOOL AND UPPER TO MIDDLE- CLASS'NEIGHBORHOOD. 1. ACCIDENTS - LIABILITY A. NO HELMETS - WHO IS GOING TO ENFORCE HELMET USE, IF ANY? IF YOU -LOOK AT THE MAGAZINES YOU WILL NOTICE THE MAJORITY OF CHILDREN ARE WITHOUT HELMETS? MEDICAL EMERGENCY ISSUES ARE COVERED AT LENGTH IN THE PERIODICAL "TRANSWORLD SKATEBOARDING'" UNDER THE ARTICLE APPROPRIATELY ENTITLED "PAYING THE PIPER" B. § tp.RERA4S4GN '- WILL THERE BE ANY ONE FROM PUBLIC WORKS IN AREA? IF SO, HOW MANY HOURS PER DAY AND WHAT IS THE FISCAL IMPACT OF EXPANDED HOURS TO THE PUBLIC WORKS DEPARTMENT? SO ARE PARTICIPANTS USING THE SKATEPARK UNDER THE PREMISE "AT RISK" AND WHAT ARE THE LEGAL RAMIFICATIONS TO THE CITY OF . ROHNERT PARK? C. RESPONSIBILITY FOR MEDICAL INJURIES SUSTAINED IN PARK AND ON SKATEPARK. WHO IS HELD ACCOUNTABLE? SINCE,IT IS ON.PUBLIC AND CITY PROPERTY, WILL THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK. CARRY A MULTIMILLION DOLLAR INSURANCE POLICY COVERING ACCIDENTS? D. LIABILITY OF INEXPERIENCED USERS. FOR EXAMPLE, YOU SEND YOUR CHILD TO PLAY BASKETBALL AT THE PARK AND YOU ARE NOTIFIED BY AN EMERGENCY UNIT YOUR CHILD IS INJURED FROM AN INJURY SUSTAINED WHILE ON THE SKATE STRUCTURE. WHO IS RESPONSIBLE AND HELD ACCOUNTABLE IN THIS INSTANCE? . II. DISTURBANCE OF THE PEACE - NOISE A. SUBURBAN AREA - IS THE CITY GOING TO INSTALL LIGHTS SINCE WE KNOW PARTICIPANTS WILL USE THE STRUCTURE AT ALL HOURS. WHAT HAPPENS TO THE PROPERTY OWNERS IN THE VICINITY... WILL HOUSING VALUES DECLINE? THIS COULD ALSO LEAD TO THE USE OF AMPLIFIED MUSIC, FOR EXAMPLE, BOOMBOXES. III. DESTRUCTION OF PROPERTY MAGAZINES INDICATE PART OF THE EXCITEMENT AND THRILL OF SKATEBOARDING AND IN-LINE SKATING IS SKATING ON FOREIGN STRUCTURES AND THE ABILITY TO DO IT SUCCESSFULLY. YOU MIGHT NOT THINK OF USINGA SKATEBOARD ON BLEACHERS BUT IN THE MAGAZINES NOTHING IS SACRED. A. IF SKATEPARK IS CROWDED AND IN USE, DOES THIS MEAN PARTICIPANTS WILL USE ADJOINING TENNIS COURTS, BASKETBALL AND SIDEWALKS, PARK BENCHES AND AS YOU CAN SEE FROM THE MAGAZINES, BLEACHERS AS WELL AS STAIRS ARE USED. 1 V. INFLUX OF CHILDREN AND ADULTS FROM OTHER COMMUNITIES TO ROHNERT PARK A. LACK OF UNCONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT BUILT SKATEPARKS IN THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA - BECAUSE IT IS A PUBLIC PARK AND A FREE PLAY STRUCTURE IT COULD POSSIBLY BECOME CROWDED WITH CHILDREN AND ADULTS FROM DIFFERENT AREAS. FOR EXAMPLE, THE SKATEPARK IN SANTA ROSA AND NAPA. FROM OUR UNDERSTANDING THEY HAVE ISSUES RELATIVE TO GANG PROBLEMS, ETC. HAS ANYONE DONE ANY RESEARCH WITH THESE COMMUNITIES RELATIVE TO THE PROS AN D CONS OF HAVING SUCH A STRUCTURE IN A PUBLIC PARK? RAMIFCATIONS OF UNCONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT FOR SKATEPARK IN ROHNERT PARK - FISCAL - REPAIR OF STRUCTURE AS WELL AS DAMAGED STRUCTURES WITHIN THE PARK NOT TO MENTION. P©SSIBILITY'OF KIDS SKATING ON THE GRASS. MAJOR FISCAL IMPACT TO THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK WHEN A MULTI- MILLION DOLLAR LAWSUIT IS FILED AGAINST CITY OF ROHNERT PARK DUE TO INJURIES SUSTAINED ON SKATEPARK. LOCAL PAPER MOST RECENTLY INDICATED ROHNERT PARK WAS FINANCIALLY STRUGGLING SINCE THE LOSS OF MAJOR DEPARTMENT STORES, ETC. HAS ANYONE THOUGHT OF AN ALTERNATIVE TO A UNCONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT r.2- SKATEPARK AND THOUGHT OF USING THE EMPTY K -MART AND PARKING LOT FOR A CONTROLLED ENVIROMENT SKATEPARK OR NEXT TO ' SCANDIA. IT WOULD BE A WIN-WIN FOR EVERYONE, IF THERE WERE A CONTROLLED ENVIRONMENT SKATEPARK, THE OWNERS COULD ASSESS A ENTRANCE FEE WHICH WOULD PAY FOR LIABILITY INSURANCE AND THE COUNTY AS WELL AS CITY COULD CHARGE THEIR APPROPRIATE ASSESSMENTS TO HAVING THIS SKATEPARK IN ROHNERT PARK. WE ALREADY HAVE AN IN-LINE SKATE HOCKEY ARENA IN COTATI. MAYBE SOMEONE COULD SPEAK WITH THEM ABOUT IDEAS RELATIVE TO CONSTRUCTING ONE IN OUR AREA. Al LOUIE LEROUX JANET LER UX KY E LEROUX Z A- LAAN WRIGHT SABRINA WRIGHT Lou, Here is the information you requested. I searched back to 1/1/94 for every call we responded td'at Honeybee Park and Pool. All the offenses are listed either below or on the Call Types sheet. If you have any questions about any of this give me a call. Hope this will help your endeavor. OFFENSE: Type of offense found at scene 314.1 Indecent Exposure 415 Disturbing the peace 417 Threatening w/ a Weapon 459 Burglary, 459V Vehicle Burglary 488 Petty Theft =;594(B)(G)- ; :-.Gan andalism-Graffifi 11550(A) Under Influence of Drugs 6.08.160 Dog Bite Report Any other offense listed on the inquiry is listed on the CFS/MSR Codes sheet. O/SP: Disposition Codes AR ARREST MADE DC DETAIL COMPLETE GA GONE ON ARRIVAL RP REPORT WRITTEN CN CALL CANCELED PRIOR TO ARRIVAL OF UNFOUNDED BY OFFICER o `d Q.V( Jr twL� "b : Am � � t CHAPTER 2 CODES CFS/MSR CODES* (Call Types) denotes that these codes must be understood and memorized. CALL DESCRIPTION 1 Domestic Complaint 2 Suspicious Auto 3 Suspicious Person 4 Frightened Person 5 Service to Outside Agency 5H Medical Call - Ambulance 5C Subpoena Service - Civil 5S Subpoena Service - Criminal 5W Warrant Service - Out of County 6 Occurred Outside Jurisdiction 7 Misc. Traffic Problem 7H Traffic Hazard 8 Traffic Post 9 Public Service 9B False Alarm (Burglary) 9F False Alarm (Fire) N Page 2 of 4 CFS/MSR Codes 913 False Alarm (Robbery) 9S Extra Patrol 9W RUOK Check (Are You Okay) 10 City Service; 10PW Referred to Public Works 11 Street Light Out 12 Suspicious Circumstances 13 Civil Matter 13A Civil Accident 13R Vehicle Repossession 14 Noise Abatement 15 Notification 1.6 Night Light Out 17 Open Door 18 Open Window 19 False Alarm (Not Fire) (Billable) 20 Lost Child 21 Animal Impound 22 False Fire Alarm (Billable) 23 Neighborhood Disturbance Page 2 of 4 CFS/MSR Codes CFS/MSR Call Types Page 3 of 4 CFS/MSR Codes 24 Juvenile Complaint 25 Animal Complaint 26 Accident - Non -Injury 261 Accident - Injury 27A Fire Automatic Aid to either Rancho Adobe or Rincon Valley Fire Districts 27H Fire-Haz-Mat 27M Fire Mutual Aid to anywhere in USA 270 Fire - Other 27S Fire - Structure 27V Fire - Vehicle 28 Muni Code Violation - Other Than Vehicle 28V Vehicle abatement- Muni Code Violation 29 Fire Inspection 30 Lost/Found Property 31 NOT USED AS A CFS CODE 32 Unexplained Death 33 CPS Referral 34 Gang Activity 34U University Square - Gang Activity Page 4 of 4 CFS/MSR Codes 14205 Missing Persons CP Community Policing WARRANT Warrant Arrest X Not Listed All other types of calls are to show as actual statute code, P.C., V.C., H&S, etc. If the computer will not accept the code as shown on the report, place it under the "X" designator Records will check these entries on an individual basis. r 0 ..:............. VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY .............. . LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ................................................................................ 1 97014902 08/08/97 1513 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK 2 97016731 09/01/97 1650 9 DC HONEYBEE PARK 3 97016124 08/25/97 0818 488 RP HONEYBEE PARK 97.015852 08/21/97 1242 594 (B) (4:'-" RP HONEYBEE PARK 5 97015854 08/21/97 1249 WARRANT AR HONEYBEE PARK ,6 97014893 08/08/97 1337 594 (4-) G v` RP HONEYBEE PARK 7 97013377 07/19/97 1823 488 RP HONEYBEE PARK t,8 97013363 07/19/97 1410 594(B)(4 RP HONEYBEE PARK 9 97013319 07/18/97 2235 24:. DC HONEYBEE PARK 97013315 07/18/97 2209 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 1`1 97013218 07/17/97 2139 2.4. .: CN HONEYBEE PARK .12 97012363 07/05/97 0928.594(B)(4 RP HONEYBEE PARK 13 97012336 07/05/97 0928 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK 97011815 06/27/97 1949 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 15 97011776 06/27/97 1218 2 GA HONEYBEE PARK .:.,16 97010068 06/04/97 1709 24 GA HONEYBEE PARK ................................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ............................................................................... THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ........:.... VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY .............. LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ................................................................................ 1 97011016 06/17/97 2111 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK 2 97009628 05/29/97 1958 3 GA HONEYBEE PARK 3 97009489 05/27/97 22.49 14 ✓ GA HONEYBEE PARK .4 97008829 05/17/97 2344 14 DC HONEYBEE PARK .5 97008823 05/17/97 2217 59403)(4 !- RP HONEYBEE PARK 6 97008432 05/12/97 1156 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK 7 97008426 05/12/97 1100 594(B)(4 RP HONEYBEE PARK 8 97007326 04/25/97 2027 3 DC HONEYBEE PARK 9 97006381 04/12/97 1051 9S DC HONEYBEE PARK 10 97006421 04/12/97 2201 14 = DC HONEYBEE PARK 11.97006345 04/11/97 2141 14 GA HONEYBEE PARK 12 97005419 03/28/97 2012 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 13 97005339 03/27/97 1849 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK 14 97005296 03/27/97 0843 4 DC HONEYBEE PARK 15 97004881 03/20/97 1919 14 DC HONEYBEE PARK 16 97004503 03/14/97 2309 11550(A) AR HONEYBEE PARK ................................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ................................................................................ THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ................ VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION .................................................................. 1 97003965 03/06/97 2039 488 RP HONEYBEE PARK .2 96022535 11/30/96 1453 24 GA HONEYBEE PARK 3:97003893 03/05/97 1836 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 4 96022324 11/26/96 1739 24. DC HONEYBEE PARK 5.96022164 11/23/96 2139 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 6 97002739 02/14/97 1837 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 7 97002390 02/08/97 1628 488 RP HONEYBEE PARK 8 97001356 01/23/97 2042 24 = DC HONEYBEE PARK 9. .96022fa60'::::12/02./.96:::.:.1.63:2;'.24 GA HONEYBEE PARK !'6`9602.2256 11/25/96 1559 24 = DC HONEYBEE PARK 11.96022102 11/22/96 1852. 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 12 96021969 11/20/96 1740 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK :13 9602.1599 11/14/96 1855 594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 14 96021579 11/14/96 18.04 594.(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 1.5 96020795 11/01/96.2325 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK ::16-96019974. 10/20/96 174.4 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK .................................................................. ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY .......................................,........................... THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ................ VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY ............... . LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ................................................................................ 1 96019773 10/17/96 1656 488 RP HONEYBEE PARK 2 96019349 10/11/96 2231 9 OF HONEYBEE PARK 3:" 96018811 10/04/96. 1813,,,: 4�(4:)Gt/ RP HONEYBEE PARK 4-X96018073 09/2.3/96 1.7.2.9. 24 ,/ GA HONEYBEE PARK 5 96017891 09/20/96 2258 3 GA HONEYBEE PARK ;,6;-_96017134. 09/11/96 0033. 594 (4) G c- RP HONEYBEE PARK 7,,:9:601.7117 09/10/96 2251 594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 8 96016804 09/06/96 2226 245 RP HONEYBEE PARK ;.9-.96016668 09/04/96 2220 594(B)(4 RP HONEYBEE PARK 10,96016658 09/04/96 2217 594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 11 96016421 09/01/96 1745 314.1 RP HONEYBEE PARK 12 96015332 08/17/96 1717 9 DC HONEYBEE PARK ;13,9601520.4 08/15/96 2135 24 OF HONEYBEE PARK 14 96014635 08/08/96 0107 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 15!=*96014630 08/07/96 2218 2.4.1, GA HONEYBEE PARK 16 96013543 07/23/96 1201 21 DC HONEYBEE PARK ................................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY .................EN............................................................... THERE ARE MORE TRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW .............. VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY .............. LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ................................................................................ i,1 9.60132.36 07/18/,96: 175:4..594-(4)G. �.% RP HONEYBEE PARK :21--96013235. 07/18/96 1754 5.94_(B) (4 . ' RP HONEYBEE PARK X3-9:5015469 07/10/9:5-1718 24::. DC HONEYBEE PARK .4'96012675 07/11/96 0402 488 RP HONEYBEE PARK 5 96012276 07/05/96 1842 25 OF HONEYBEE PARK -'-.96012037 07/02/96 1445 24, GA HONEYBEE PARK ,7;`96011998 07/02/96'0353 24. GA HONEYBEE PARK 8 96011352 06/23/96 1249 415 RP HONEYBEE PARK ,"9. 96010324 06/08/96 1706 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 1.0,.96010220 06/07/96 0617 14 DC HONEYBEE PARK 11 96009983 06/03/96 1411 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK . 12 96009880 06/02/96 0013 3 DC HONEYBEE PARK 13 96007160 04/21/96 1108 314.1 RP HONEYBEE POOL ..14..96006394-04/09/96 1901 2.4 GA HONEYBEE PARK . 15 96004758 03/15/96 1118 9 6C HONEYBEE PARK 16 95028427 12/30/95 1357 25 GA H PARK ................................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEWDETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ................................................................................ THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ................ VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY ............... . LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ................................................................................ 1...96002790 02/13/96 1333..594(4)G> RP HONEYBEE PARK 2 96001679 01/27/96 1942 459V RP HONEYBEE PARK .:%3 96001619. 01/26/96 1850 594(4.)G .. RP HONEYBEE PARK 4 96001618 01/26/96 1850 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK 5 96001612 01/26/96 1751 WARRANT AR HONEYBEE PARK .6 9600072.7 01/13/96 00.06 594.(4)G :; RP HONEYBEE PARK 7 96000472 01/09/96 0821 3 DC HONEYBEE PARK 8 95026.926 12./07/95 034.8 594.(4)G.=- RP HONEYBEE PARK 9 95026171 11/24/95 1730 10 CN HONEYBEE PARK 10 95026105.11/23/95 0936 594(B)(4 RP HONEYBEE PARK 1;1 95025194. 11/10/95 1246 2.4 t%' DC H PARK 12 95024343 10/29/95 1628 12 OF HONEYBEE PARK 13 95.023912 10/22/95 2007 594(B)(4.- RP HONEY BEE PARK 14 95022953 10/10/95 0910 459 RP HONEYBEE PARK 15 95022769 10/07/95 1604 3 GA HONEYBEE PARK 16 95022637 10/06/95 0658 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK ................................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ................................................................................ THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ............... VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY .............. LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ................................................................................ 1,. 95.022.20.0 09/30/95 2233 594 (B) (4 RP HONEYBEE PARK 2 95021876 09/27/95 0537 459 RP HONEYBEE PARK =3 95021339 09/19/95.19.09 14. DC HONEYBEE PARK 4::9.5021262 09/18/95 1812-24 GA HONEYBEE PARK 5 95021183 09/17/95 1828 594(B)(4 RP HONEYBEE PARK 6 95021130 09/16./95 2002. 14. UL HONEYBEE PARK 7 95020530 09/09/95 0012 10 CN HONEYBEE PARK 8 95020187 09/05/95 1321 12 GA HONEYBEE PARK 9 95019825 08/31/95 2129 3 GA HONEYBEE PARK 10.950.18792.08/18/95 212.6 24:.x- GA HONEYBEE PARK -.11 95016681 07/24./95 1902 594(B)(41j RP HONEYBEE PARK 12 95015860 07/15/95 0031 9 DC HONEYBEE PARK . 13 95015374 07/09/95 1144 '30 RP HONEYBEE PARK ..14 95014600 07/0.1/95 1616 14. i- DC HONEYBEE PARK . 15 950145.4.9._06/30/95 2202 24 GA HONEYBEE PARK . 16 95013982 06/24/95 1352 6.08.160 RP HONEYBEE PARK ................................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ................................................................................ THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ............. VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY ........... LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ............................................................................. 1 95013731 06/21/95 1651 9 DC HONEYBEE PARK 2 95013237 06/15/95 1142 12 DC HONEYBEE PARK 3 95011845 05/28/95 2215 488 RP HONEYBEE PARK 4 95011603 05/25/95 1753 594(4),RP HONEYBEE PARK 5,95011550 05/24/95 2005 594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 6 95008809 04/19/95 1926 594(4)G = RP HONEYBEE PARK .7,; 95008806 04/19./95 1920 594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 8 95008285 04/13/95 1245-24 DC HONEYBEE PARK ,9.95008253 04/12/95 2131 594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 10 95007633 04/05/95 1102 459 RP HONEYBEE PARK .,11 95007127 03/29/95 2146 594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 12 95006499 03/22/95 1744 594(4)G = RP HONEYBEE PARK 13 95004774 03/01/95 2300 417 RP HONEYBEE PARK 14 95003598 02/15/95 1743 270 RP HONEYBEE PARK 15 95002731 02/05/95 1;757 2 GA HONEYBEE PARK 16 95001510 01/2.1-/95=-1347 :2:4 GA HONEYBEE PARK ............................................................................. ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ............................................................................. THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ............. VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ................................................................ 1 94027663 12/16/94 0237 594(4)G;, RP HONEYBEE PARK 2 94027383 12/12/94 1429 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK :3 94026614 12/02/94 0118 594(4)G,- RP HONEYBEE PARK A-94026610 12/02/94 0118 594.(4)G,., RP HONEYBEE PARK 5 94026525 12/01:/94 0029 488 RP HONEYBEE PARK ;6::-940260.98 11/24/94.2053 594(4)G,,- RP HONEYBEE PARK ::7 940250.06 11/09/94 2156 594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 8 94024399 11/02/94 0346 488 RP HONEYBEE PARK 9.94024296 10/31/94 1922 24 :. DC H6NEYBEE PARK 1.0 94023705 10/24/94 1637 24 GA HONEYBEE PARK 11 94023094 10/17/94 1025 459 CN HONEYBEE PARK 12 94022850 10/13/94 2213 459 RP HONEYBEE PARK 13 94022665:7:=-10/11/94:.4.2136 594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 14 94022.448 10/08/94 2307 24 DC :HONEYBEE PARK 15 94022143 10/05/94 0256 594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 16 94022135 10/04/94 2245 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK ................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ................................................................ THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ................ VT-PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY .............. . LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ................................................................................ 1 94021713 09/29/94 2244 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK 2 94021623 09/29/94 0439 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK 3 94021570 09/28/94 1720 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK 4. 94021516 09/28/94. 0454. 594.(4).G.. RP HONEYBEE PARK 5 94.0215.06 09/28/94 0121 594.(4.)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 6. 9402.1213 09/24/94--1620. 24. GA HONEYBEE PARK 7.> 94021133 09/23/94:_ 2209. 24_.v DC HONEYBEE PARK 8 94020866 09/21/94 1450 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK ,9 94020850 09/21/94. 1242 c594.(B) (4,..-- RP HONEYBEE PARK 0.94020685 09/19/94 1821.24 - DC HONEYBEE PARK 11_.94.0.2.0508 09/17/94 1933. 2.4 v GA HONEYBEE PARK 12 94.0202.71 09/15/94 0822..,594 (B) (4 :. RP HONEYBEE PARK .13 94020243 09/14/9-4 2115 5.94.(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK "14:. 940200.19. 09/12./9.4 0246 594-(4) G RP HONEYBEE PARK -l5.-:--.94019666 09/07/94 210.6 5.94:(4).G RP HONEYBEE PARK 16... 9.4019515: 09/06/94- 0623: 594.(4-) G-..tom' RP HONEYBEE PARK ............................................................................... ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ................................................................................ THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ................ VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY .............. LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ................................................................................ 1 94018331 08/,24/94. 0020 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 2 94016812 08/07/94 0034 2 DC HONEYBEE PARK 3 94016735 08/06/94 0026 12 UL HONEYBEE PARK .4 94015952 07/27/94.18.13. 24_ L.. GA HONEYBEE PARK 5 94015813 07/26/94 0045 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK ;:16..94015587 07/22./94 2314-24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 7-94015220 07/18/94 2057. 2.4._., DC HONEYBEE PARK ,,:,8 94014756 07/13/94.1534 24 . DC HONEYBEE PARK 9 94.014137 07/05/94-1918 594(4)G.•L- RP HONEYBEE PARK 10 94013916 07/03/94 0011 12 DC HONEYBEE PARK X11 94013811 07/01/94 1937 24 OF HONEYBEE PARK 12..: 94013196 06/24/94 2325 594 (B) (4 L. RP HONEYBEE PARK .;13 94012786 06/19/94 2052. 594(B)(4 L RP HONEYBEE PARK . 14 94012647 06/18/94 0153 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK .,15 940124.79 06/1.6/94 0441..594(4)G RP HONEYBEE PARK 16 940.12364 06/14/94 2321 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK ................................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ................................................................................ THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ................ VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION .................................................................. 1 94012307 06/14/94 0956 12 DC HONEYBEE PARK 2 94011959 06/09/94 2324 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK 3. 9401.1.4.06 06/03/94 2331..5.94.(B) (4.:_, RP HONEYBEE PARK 4 94011405 06/03/94 2315 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK 5 94011300 06/02/94.2302 14 t- DC HONEYBEE PARK 6 94011235 06/01/94 2328 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK 7 94011178 06/01/94 1306 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK 8 94011108 05/31/94-1633 24 DC HONEYBEE PARK 9 94011013 05/30/94 1254 459 RP HONEYBEE PARK 10 94010928 05/29/94 0044 9S DC HONEYBEE PARK . 11 94010198 05/19/94 2335 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK .12. 94009852 05/15/94 0221 594.(B)(4,- RP HONEYBEE PARK 13 94009851 05/15/94 0208 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK 14 94009587 05/11/94 2259 30 RP HONEYBEE PARK 15 94009585 05/1--1/94 2238 10 DC HONEYBEE PARK 16 94009496 05/11/94 0602 9 DC HONEYBEE PARK .................................................................. ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY .................................................................. THERE ARE MORE ENTRIES - USE 'NEXT PAGE' TO VIEW ................ VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: CFS SUMMARY .............. . LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE DISP LOCATION ................................................................................ 1.97008321 05/10/97 1555 24 DC HONEYBEE POOL 2 96014800 08/10/96 1549 459 RP HONEYBEE POOL 3 96013377 07/20/96 1904 148(A) RP HONEYBEE POOL 4 95013986 06/24/95 1430 7 GA HONEYBEE POOL .5 95013209 06/15/95 0007 594(B)(4 RP HONEYBEE POOL 6 94026680 12/02/94 2039 24 DC HONEYBEE POOL 7 94015682 07/24/94 0805 9 DC HONEYBEE POOL 8 94013637 06/29/94 1511 6.08.160 RP HONEYBEE POOL 9 95026140 11/24/95 0546 459 RP H POOL ................................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ................................................................................ THERE ARE NO MORE QUALIFIED ENTRIES VT -PRISM GENERAL INQUIRY: LN CASE NO DATE TIME OFFENSE CODE ........................................... 1 94009466 05/10/"94.. 1811.2.4 2 94009411 05/10/94 0044 10 3 94009044 05/04/94 2344 10 4 94008214 04/23/94 1559 21 5 94008147 04/22/94 1951 459 6 94006408 03/31/94 1042 594(4)G 7. 94005029 03/13/94 01401 24" 8 94001808 01/27/94 2350 3 ................................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ................................................................................ THERE ARE NO MORE QUALIFIED ENTRIES CFS SUMMARY DISP LOCATION ....................... OF HONEYBEE PARK DC HONEYBEE PARK DC HONEYBEE PARK DC HONEYBEE PARK RP HONEYBEE PARK RP HONEYBEE PARK DC HONEYBEE PARK DC HONEYBEE PARK ................................................................................ ENTER SELECTION NUMBER TO VIEW DETAIL ON SPECIFIED ENTRY ................................................................................ THERE ARE NO MORE QUALIFIED ENTRIES We, the following residents of Rohnert Park, are hereby opposed to a Flat Skate Park Structure being added to Honeybee Park for all or some of the following reasons: The proximity of the park is too close to homes. There are no barriers to block light, noise, etc. and this would unfairly impact current homeowners. Adequate parking is not available for the site and it is felt that overflow will land in the Marguerite Hahn School parking lot. Adequate access to the park is not available, especially on Hudis Street. The park is joined to school property. It is felt that a Flat Skate Park would lead to more trash, broken glass, etc. which would impact school property and possibly students. School functions would be impacted. <: here.are alreadyserious problems, in thepark requiring Police involvement and it is thought that.a +Iat Skate Park will increa this: immensely: An environmental impact report is necessary and it is felt that a current one has not been done. If a current report is available, we would request a copy immediately. WE HEREBY REQUEST THAT A FLAT SKATE PARK NOT BE ADDED TO HONEYBEE PARK NOW OR AT ANYTIME IN THE FUTURE. BRAS u v , ROOM L f 00 R91- i .: �_ 11 112 PETITION We, the following residents of Rohnert Park, are hereby opposed to a Flat Skate Park Structure being added to Honeybee Park for all or some of the following reasons: [mwmi The proximity of the park is too close to homes. There are no barriers to block light, noise, etc. and this would unfairly impact current homeowners. Emmmi Adequate parking is not available for the site and it is felt that overflow will land in the Marguerite Hahn School parking lot. J Adequate access to the park is not available, especially on Hudis Street. The park is joined to school property. It is felt that a Flat Skate Park would lead to more trash, broken glass, etc. which would impact school property and possibly students. School functions would be impacted. There are already serious problems in the park requiring Police involvement and it is thought that a Flat Skate Park will increase this immensely. An environmental impact report is necessary and it is felt that a current one has not been done. If a current report is available, we would request a copy immediately. WE HEREBY REQUEST THAT A FLAT SKATE PARK NOT BE ADDED TO HONEYBEE PARK NOW OR AT ANYTIME IN THE FUTURE. We, the following residents of Rohnert Park, are hereby opposed to a Flat Skate Park Structure being added to Honeybee Park for all or some of the following reasons: The proximity of the park is too close to homes. There are no barriers to block light, noise, etc. and this would unfairly impact current homeowners. Adequate parking is not available for the site and it is felt that overflow will land in the Marguerite Hahn School parking lot. Adequate access to the park is not available, especially on Hudis Street. The park is joined to school property. It is felt that a Flat Skate Park would lead to more trash, broken glass, etc. which would impact school property and possibly students. School functions would be impacted. There are already serious problems in the park requiring Police involvement and it is thought that a Flat Skate Park will increase this immensely. An environmental impact report is necessary and it is felt that a current one has not been done. If a current report is available, we would request a copy immediately. WE HEREBY REQUEST THAT A FLAT SKATE PARK NOT BE ADDED TO HONEYBEE PARK NOW OR AT ANYTIME IN THE FUTURE. PETITION We, the following residents of Rohnert Park, are hereby opposed to a Flat Skate Park Structure being added to Honeybee Park for all or some of the following reasons: Fmmi The proximity of the park is too close to homes. There are no barriers to block light, noise, etc. and this would unfairly impact current homeowners. Adequate parking is not available for the site and it is felt that overflow will land in the Marguerite Hahn School parking lot. Adequate access to the park is not available, especially on Hudis Street. The park is joined to school property. It is felt that a Flat Skate Park would lead to more trash, broken glass, etc. which would impact school property and possibly students. School functions would be impacted. There are already serious problems in the park requiring Police involvement and it is thought that a Flat Skate Park will increase this immensely. An environmental impact report is necessary and it is felt that a current one has not been done. If a current report is available, we would request a copy immediately. WE HEREBY REQUEST THAT A FLAT SKATE PARK NOT BE ADDED TO HONEYBEE PARK NOW OR AT ANYTIME IN THE FUTURE. r �, I 11544111P_b� JIM 0_4 I'll, WAA ��II 144MMS__ _.ter-��_'���1 N - - :- Y1.1L0h. _�� � ��!-w_ _� PETITION We, the following residents of Rohnert Park, are hereby opposed to a Flat Skate Park Structure being added to Honeybee Park for all or some of the following reasons: The proximity of the park is too close to homes. There are no barriers to block light, noise, etc. and this would unfairly impact current homeowners. Adequate parking is not available for the site and it is felt that overflow will land in the Marguerite Hahn School parking lot. Adequate access to the park is not available, especially on Hudis Street. The park is joined to school property. It is felt that a Flat Skate Park would lead to more trash, broken _ glass, etc. which would impact school property and possibly students. School functions would be impacted. There are already serious problems in the park requiring Police involvement and it is thought that a Flat Skate Park will increase this immensely. An environmental impact report is necessary and it is felt that a current one has not been done. If a current report is available, we would request a copy immediately. WE HEREBY REQUEST THAT A FLAT SKA TE PARK NOT BE ADDED TO HONEYBEE PARK NOW OR AT ANYTIME IN THE FUTURE. -37, , , � z ,1, ,7), i t '' •• i LI rO�. ; ,- We, the following residents of Rohnert Park, are hereby opposed to a Flat Skate Park Structure being added to Honeybee Park for all or some of the following reasons: The proximity of the park is too close to homes. There are no barriers to block light, noise, etc. and this would unfairly impact current homeowners. Adequate parking is not available for the site and it is felt that overflow will land in the Marguerite Hahn School parking lot. Adequate access to the park is not available, especially on Hudis Street. The park is joined to school property. It is felt that a Flat Skate Park would lead to more trash, broken glass, etc. which would impact school property and possibly students. C School functions would be impacted. F --J There are already serious problems in the park requiring Police involvement and it is thought that a Flat Skate Park will increase this immensely. �e An environmental impact report is necessary and it is felt that a current one has not been done. If a current report is available, we would request a copy immediately. WE HEREBY REQUEST THAT A FLAT SKATE PARK NOT BE ADDED TO HONEYBEE PARK NOW OR AT ANYTIME IN THE FUTURE. �-7 r ('VA f 5 � 5 " yk-,I >y 0A C We, the following residents of Rohnert Park, are hereby opposed to a Flat Skate Park Structure being added to Honeybee Park for all or some of the following reasons: The proximity of the park is too close to homes. There are no barriers to block light, noise, etc. and this would unfairly impact current homeowners. Adequate parking is not available for the site and it is felt that overflow will land in the Marguerite Hahn School parking lot. Adequate access to the park is not available, especially on Hudis Street. The park is joined to school property. It is felt that a Flat Skate Park would lead to more trash, broken glass, etc. which would impact school property and possibly students. School functions would be impacted. There are already serious problems in the park requiring Police involvement and it is thought that a Flat Skate Park will increase this immensely. An environmental impact report is necessary and it is felt that a current one has not been done. If a current report is available, we would request a copy immediately. WE HEREBY REQUEST THAT A FLAT SKATE PARK NOT BE ADDED TO HONEYBEE PARK NOW OR AT ANYTIME IN THE FUTURE. ----_ ..I(.T?SAM October 23, 1997 Mayor Linda Spiro & City Council Members City of Rohnert Park Carolyn J. Abbott G7S0 Commerce Alvd. 949 Helene Ct. Rohnert Park, Ca. 94928 Ho Council Correspondence Re: Recreation & Parks Department Copy toea.'Councilman Public Hearing on Skateboard Park Copy to Honeybee Park October 20, 1997 Meeting Copyto Houurable Mayor and City Council: Copy to L I am writing on two issues regarding the above publicly announced and publicly held hearing. The meeting on the above proposed skateboard addition to-tha park was si_arted with an admonition to the attendees to be gentle with the Commission members since they were, after all, volunteers. As I'm sure the record will show, all speakers were respectful and we went thru about 1-1/2 hours of the public hearing before the Commission gave individual recommendat.i.ons. Aqain, as the record .will show, a vast majority of the speakers were against adding this invasive activity Lu Honeybee park or any other residential city park. At that point; the tone of the meeting changed. Almost without exception, the Coutituission members sent the message to us that they had already made up their minds. Not only that, we were told that we needed to attend parenting classes (by Susan Allred) and various members told us we were selfish and of NIMBY mentality, We were scolded for inferring that Skateboarders were inclined to cause vandalism or attract drug/gang activity. In short, after being invited to respond, we were treated like 2nd class citizens fnr daring to have differing opinions from the Commission. I believe all in attendance at that u►eeting arc due apologies from this Commission for their very unprofessional responses. WA are, after all, the taxpayers who help support the building & maintenance of the City and Yark facilities. We .have been involved in neighborhoodgroups trying to keep the park free of crime so that it --can be enjoyed by everyone instead of by only._a minority of special interest groups. We take pride in our neighborhood by keeping our property updated acid clean. I am infuriated by the attitude of this Commission. My second issue is that it is absolutely ridiculous to attempt to put a skateboard park in any of the existing residential parks. The Commission has already tried in other parks and residents have resisted the same, as we are resisting in Honeybee. The Commission is evidently frustratAd but they are banging their heads against a brick wall and should look at other options. � 0- ',T, _3. 1997 i 35AM t 11. S?JEE7Y NO, 33671 P. ? � 'rt is my understanding that they have not even visited the area where this is proposed; have not done a study of the impact of the incrpaged noise level on surrounding homes nor do they even realize how many or how close these homes are. It seems to me UhaL they have simply made up their minds that after being rebuffed in other parks they are going to dig in their heels and insist that it be in Honeybee regardless of the very good reasons presented against this location. When the neighborhood parks were originally built, the people in the arca were asked what they wanted in their parks. They were not told what was going to be put in each park. That is one reason why there arc different facilitipA in each park. Now, after seeing the parks become established and trying to keep the facilities we du have as free of crime and problems as possible, we're being told we have no voice in the matter? One Commission member. indicated she wanted to see every residential kark 4ave a skateboard facility. obviously, there are already some parks where this particular facility has been turned down so why would Elie Commission be eo stubborn in nontinuing to attempt to place it in a residential park. other options were given by people attending. The Commission did not seem interested. Surely there is an area in Rohnert. Park owned by the City where the facility would not be invasive on any residential areas. In the end, a sub -committee was to be organized to further discuss the Honeybee location. The Principal of Hahn school was to be included as well as the PTA representative and parents of the youths requesting the facility. However, I heard nothing about any of the residents being on this sub -committee - urge the City Council to consider a non- residt-_retial location f Or, thisrecre t. ons ani it�y. The ynam�cs of a s a e -board park, no matter ow 11small", are much ditterent from a swiItunilzg pool, tennis court or basketball court. The decibel level alone as well as the percussion characteristic of skateboard noise is enuugh to make it incompatible in a residential area. ThA media has been talking about the new General plan and the fact that it looks like there might be a new spirit of cooperation in Rohnert Park between the various factions. This is a welcome sign after living thru the embarrasment of the last few years of antics, tantrums and unbecoming behavior by which Rohnert Park has become infamous. I think.most citizens want to be_proud of their city and will work in ronperation with our elected representatives ,and volunteer workers to make our city attractive --and --meet it's citizonEl needs. we shoiild not be bullied and I believe "we have been in this case. - uc: James P. Pekkain - Director of Renreation 44 j J • ` Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Counc'slman CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Copy to /D,? INTER - OFFICE MEMORANDUM Copy to Copy to TO: Joseph D. Netter City Manager RE: Board of Permit Appeals FROM: Lee Braun V Building Officia 10 (*e4I V —r— DATE: October 23, 1997 At City Council's direction Staff has surveyed all adjacent jurisdictions as well as the County of Sonoma to determine if other jurisdictions are using their Permit Appeals Board for more than just Building Permit issues. Additionally, Staff has requested the City Attorney's office to review the applicable State statutes for any conflict regarding the combined use of a Local Permit/Codes Appeals Board. The jurisdictional survey is as follows: City of Santa Rosa Combination Building Code and Fire Code Appeals Board. City of Sonoma Combination Building code & Fire Code Appeals Board. City of Petaluma Building Code Appeals Board only. Town of Windsor City Council handles Building Code appeals only City of Cotati Building Code Appeals Board only. City of Sebastopol City Council handles Building Code appeals. County of Sonoma Combination Appeals Board. this Board also hears all Fire Code Appeals for local districts throughout the County. This would include Cotati and Windsor since they are both local districts. In my memorandum of October 2, 1997, I suggested that the City Council consider developing not only a combined Building Code and Fire Code Appeals Board but also use this Board to hear Disabled Access appeals.. While conducting the Appeals Board survey it was discovered that this Appeals Board is infrequently used, therefore, I would now suggest a countywide board to be used by all jurisdictions for this function. In discussions with other Building Officials I find considerable support for this concept. Santa Rosa's Building Official, for example, has indicated to Staff that he would definitely support the formation of a countywide Disable Access Appeals Board. To promote this concept I recommend that Staff develop a letter for the Mayor's signature to be sent to the other mayors within Sonoma County suggesting the formation of a countywide Disabled Access Appeals Board. Referencing the combined Building Code and Fire Code Appeals Board for Rohnert Park, Staff has found similar boards in other local jurisdictions as indicated in the survey. Further, Fire Commander Bob Cassel agrees that this would provide for an efficient and equitable method of addressing these issues which come up from time to time in the Administration of the Building and Fire Codes. Page 1 Therefore, I recommend that City Council direct Staff to develop an ordinance which would create an Appeals Board to hear boih Building Code and Fire Code issues. As previously recommended the Appeals Board would consist of five (5) members preferably with one member being a Fire Protection Engineer or with an associated expertise. As mentioned in point #3 of my October 2, 1997, Memorandum all decisions of the Board should not be subject to further hearings or actions by the City Council. LB: pb p.c. John Flitner, City Attorney Bob Cassel, Fire Services Commander Page 2 Ilk TO: am CITY OF ROHNERT PARI{ INTER - OFFICE MEMORANDUM Joseph D. Netter City Manager Board of Permit Appeals FROM: Lee Braun Building Officia DATE: October 23, 1997 At City Council's direction Staff has surveyed all adjacent jurisdictions as well as the County of Sonoma to determine if other jurisdictions are using their Permit Appeals Board for more than just Building Permit issues. Additionally, Staff has requested the City Attorney's office to review the applicable State statutes for any conflict regarding the combined use of a Local Permit/Codes Appeals Board. The jurisdictional survey is as follows: City of Santa Rosa Combination Building Code and Fire Code Appeals Board. City of Sonoma Combination Building code & Fire Code Appeals Board. City of Petaluma Building Code Appeals Board only. Town of Windsor City Council handles Building Code appeals only City of Cotati Building Code Appeals Board only. City of Sebastopol City Council handles Building Code appeals. County of Sonoma Combination Appeals Board. this Board also hears all Fire Code Appeals for local districts throughout the County. This would include Cotati and Windsor since they are both local districts. In my memorandum of October 2, 1997, I suggested that the City Council consider developing not only a combined Building Code and Fire Code Appeals Board but also use this Board to hear Disabled Access appeals.. While conducting the Appeals. Board survey it was discovered that this Appeals Board is infrequently used, therefore, I would now suggest a countywide board to be used by all jurisdictions for this function. - In discussions with other Building Officials I find considerable support for this concept. Santa Rosa's Building Official, for example, has indicated to Staff that he would definitely support the formation of a countywide Disable Access Appeals Board. To promote this concept I recommend that Staff develop a letter for the Mayor's signature to be sent to the other mayors within Sonoma County suggesting the formation of a countywide Disabled Access Appeals Board. Referencing the combined Building Code and Fire Code Appeals Board for Rohnert Park, Staff has found similar boards in other local jurisdictions as indicated in the survey. Further, Fire Commander Bob Cassel agrees that this would provide for an efficient and equitable method of addressing these issues which come up from time to time in the Administration of the Building and Fire Codes. Page 1 Therefore, I recommend that City Council direct Staff to develop an ordinance which would create an Appeals Board to hear both Building Code and Fire Code issues. As previously recommended the Appeals Board would consist of five (5) members preferably with one member being a Fire Protection Engineer or with an associated expertise. As mentioned in point #3 of my October 2, 1997, Memorandum all decisions of the Board should not be subject to further hearings or actions by the City Council. M p.c. John Flitner, City Attorney Bob Cassel, Fire Services Commander Page 2 6;t�i%2�/4'7 Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Copy" s2 6750 Commerce Blvd. Copy to Rohnert Park, CA 94928 Copy to (707)793-7212 FAX: (707)793-7274 TO: Joseph Netter, City Manager Members of the City Council Mem;Weivo, the Planning Commission FROM: Carl Assistant City. Manager DATE: October 20, 1997 SUBJECT. Existing Environmental Conditions- - The Citv has received an existing environmental conditions report from Dyett & Bhatia (attached). This report surveys the planning framework, community facilities, utilities -and services, environmental resources and constraints, land use and visual character, noise, and air quality. Please note that Dyett & Bhatia has indicated a "study area' on selected maps. This "study area" corresponds to majority direction from both the City Council and Planning Commission. On the other hand, the boundary remains subject to change. We thought it best to include the "study area' line to provide a frame of reference. The report ..documents significant environmental conditions both inside and outside the "study area." On occasion, the report refers to the Rohnert Park General Plan. These observations refer to the Rohnert Park General Plan, adopted in 1995. J :Environmental Setting for City of Rohnert Park General Plan Update Prepared by DYETT & BHATIA Urban and Regional Planners In association with Illingworth & Rodkin, Inc., Noise Consultants Wetland Research Associates M'OC Physics Air Quality Consultants TABLE OF CONTENTS 1. Introduction......................................................................................................................................... 1 2. Planning and Growth Framework..................................................................................................... 3 RohnertPark..........................................................................................................................................3 SonomaCounty .....................................................................................................................................5 CotatiGeneral Plan..............................................................................................................................10 Santa Rosa General Plan and Growth Management Ordinance........................................................10 SonomaState University ........:.............................................................................................................11 3. Community Facilities, Utilities and Services....................................:............:................................ 15 Parksand Community Facilities:........................................................................................................15 Schools................:...................................................................................:.............................................17 PublicSafety .........................................................................................................................................20 WastewaterServices............................................................................................................................21 WaterSupply............................:...........................................................................................................25 StormDrainage........................:...........................................................................................................28 Solidand Hazardous Waste......:.:........................................................................................................28 4. Environmental Resources and Constraints..................................................................................... 32 Geologyand Seismicity ...........:............................................................................................................32 Soils and Agircultural Resources.........................................................................................................35 ExistingConditions..............................................................................................................................38 Wetlands...................................:...........:...............................................................................................39 VernalPool and Rare Plant Habitat....................................................................................................41 Developmentand Mitigation Issues....................................................................................................43 CulturalResources..................................................................................:............................................45 Summaryof Environmental Constraints............................................................................................46 5. Land Use and Visual Character........................................................................................................ 49 NeighborhoodForm.......................:....................................................................................................53 Form of Commercial and Industrial Development.......................................................................—.57 Visual Analysis of Community Chi racter..».......................................................................................60 6. Noise....................................................................................................».............................................66 NoiseCharacteristics.............::.:...::....:..................................................:..............................................66 NoiseSources in Rohnert Park........:..............................................'.....................................................70 7. Air Quality ..............................................................................................:........................................... 76 "Criteria" Pollutants..................::........................................................................................................76 Ambient Air Quality Standards.....:...:::..............................................:................................................76 Ozone............................:........:...:...:......................................................................................................78 CarbonMonoxide..................:....:......................................................................:.................................79 ParticulateMatter ...............:'::.............................................................................................................80 EmissionsInventory..:.........:`:.....:.........................................................................................................81 Local Stationary Sources of_Toxic Air Contaminants........................................................................82 The Regional Plan..............83 CriteriaFor Significance ............................................................................................83 MAPS PlanningArea.........................................................:........................................................................................2 Rohnert Park General Plan Land Use Designations......................................................................................4 County and Adjacent Jurisdictions Land Use Designations..........................................................................7 Parksand Schools........................................................:....................................................................:..........16 Waterand Wastewater Systems..................................:::::.............................................................................26 Santa Rosa Long -Term Wastewater Project: Alternative 2 — South County Reclamation ........ ................27 Drainageand Flood Zones............................................................................................................................29 Geology............................................................................................................................................................33 LiquefactionSusceptibility............................................::..............................................................................34 ImportantFarmland......................................................................................................................................36 Soil Types, Capability, Expansiveness and Erosion Potential.....................................................................37 WildlifeHabitat.............................................................................................................................................40 Wetlands, Vernal Pool and Rare Plant Habitat............................................................................................42 ArcheologicalResources................................................................................................................................47 Environmental Resources and Constraints..................................................................................................48 Historyof Development................................................................................................................................50 VacantLand..................................................................:................................................................................51 CurrentDevelopment Activity, 1997......................:....................................................................................52 NeighborhoodForm Analysis.....................................................................................................:.................56 Form of Commercial and Industrial Development.....................................................................................59 Visual Character: Eastside Study Area..........................................................................................................62 Visual Character: Development Adjacent to Westside::.............................................................................64 Visual Character: Westside Agricultural Areas ::::...::.::...::..: ..........65 NoiseMonitoring Locations........................................:::::............................................................................71 RoadNoise Levels..........................................................::....................................................::...:..:.........::....:.75 . TABLES Table 1 Sonoma County General Plan Growth Projections for Rohnert Park.......................................5 Table 2 ABAG Year 2015 Projections.....................................................................................................13 Table 3 Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District Enrollment and Capacity .................................18 Table 4 Wastewater Treatment Capacity ................................................................................................22 Table 5 Rohnert Park Solid Waste, 1990................................................................................................30 Table 6 Special. Status Plant and Animal Species that May Occur in the Rohnert Park Study Area ...44 Table 7 Definitions of Acoustical Terms..............................:.................................................................68 Table 8 Typical Sound Levels Measured in the Environment And Industry ........................................69 Table 9 Existing (1997) Traffic Noise Levels in Rohnert.Park................................................................ 73 Table 10 Ambient Air Quality Standards..................................................................................................77 Table 11 Ozone Data— Santa Rosa and Sonoma....................................................................................79 Table 12 Carbon Monoxide Data— Santa Rosa.......................................................................................80 Table 13 Airborne Particulate Data— Santa Rosa...................................................................................81 Table 14 Sonoma County. Emissions (1995)— Tons/Day.......................................................................82 ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING I. INTRODUCTION This working paper summarizes the existing conditions in the Rohnert Park planning area, which includes land within the City limits and two study areas: one on the Eastside and one on the Westside (see -map on the following page). As such, -it is intended to provide the setting for the environmental analysis to be conducted on the General Plan Update. The existing conditions provide the framework for assessing the impacts of potential development if the City were to expand its current limits into either the Westside or the Eastside. The paper is intended as background information for participants at the General Plan summit. This analysis will be updated and refined based on comments by City staff and others and further analysis of available information. Additional information on the City's transportation system, the noise environment, vernal pool habitat, and air quality impacts associated with growth in traffic will be included in the environmental assessment. This information is being compiled by other consultants and is not yet available. Study Area P anniri gArea ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING 2. PLANNING AND GROWTH FRAMEWORK This chapter establishes the planning context for the General Plan Update, including relevant information from current General Plans of the City and adjacent jurisdictions. It also includes a brief review of historic and current projections of population and employment growth for the Rohnert Park planning area as.background information. GENERAL PLANS Development policies and programs as presented in the City's current General Plan and in the General Plans of surrounding jurisdictions have a bearing on Rohnert Park's planning efforts and provide a frame of reference for this General Plan Update. These include the Sonoma County General Plan, the Santa Rosa General Plan and the Cotati General Plan. Also relevant are the adopted policies in the City's current General Plan, which call for cooperation with adjacent jurisdictions and.recognition of shared policies for open space preservation. ROHNERT PARK The City's 1995 General Plan provides a comprehensive framework for physical development within the City and its designated Sphere of Influence. It includes goals, objectives, principles, policies, standards, proposals and implementing actions. It also calls for a thorough General Plan review prior to any annexation of land beyond that provided for in the plan. The Plan is intended to provide for a population of between 40,000 and 45,000 within the existing City limits and the two limited areas outside the City that are within the City's Sphere of Influence (Canon Manor and 24 acres north and south of Wilfred Avenue west of Redwood Drive). The Land Use Diagram shows the plan for ultimate development under the City's current General Plan. The City is substantially built -out, and little land remains for residential development. According to City staff, development on vacant land within the City could accommodate only 287 additional housing units (176 single-family and 111 multi- family). New retail and commercial space in areas designated for shopping centers could . total around 660,000 square feet, while 1.2 million square feet of light industrial space could be built on vacant sites in the industrial areas, most of which would be west of Highway 101 in the Rohnert Park Business -Park and on adjacent industrial land. [3l Rural Residential (1 un/ac) Low Density Residential (1-5 un/ac) Intermediate Density Residential (5-10 un/ac) 0 High Density Residential (10-30 un/ac) _ Commercial (30-35% lot coverage) N Neighborhood Commercial C Community Commercial R Regional Commercial [� Professional/Office/Medical (30-35% lot coverage) _ Public (30-35% lot coverage) Institutional (Schools) --� Parks, Recreation and �- Golf Course Facilities I Industrial/Distribution (30-35% lot coverage) Source: City of Rohnert Park General Plan, 1995. General Plan Land Use Designations ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING SO.NOMA COUNTY Sonoma County's growth assumptions for Rohnert Park, established in the 1989 General Plan, were relatively consistent with those stated in the 1990 Rohnert Park General Plan. ABAG's current projections anticipate slightly higher growth targets for population (+6 percent) and substantially more employment growth (+48 percent) as part of a general trend toward more North Bay growth than had been foreseen in the late 1980s and early 1990s. Table 1 shows the County's growth projections for the Rohnert Park/Cotati area in the 1989 General Plan. Table 1 SONOMA COUNTY GENERAL PLAN GROWTH PROJECTIONS FOR ROHNERT PARK 1990 2005 Rohnert Park Population 31,500 42,200 Rohnert Park Housing Units 12,180 16,360 Rohnert Park/Cotati Area Employment 13,160 18,220 Source: Sonoma County General Plan, 1989. According.to the Sonoma County General Plan, the principal land use issue in the Rohnert Park-Cotati area is the accommodation of growth within urban areas, particularly in Rohnert Park. The County's plan also establishes a framework for protection of open spaces, specifically favoring the continued viability of agricultural uses in the county, and contains stringent policies regulating urban development, particularly in -those areas closest to urban spheres of influence that are most vulnerable to urbanization, but specifically exempts agricultural buildings from setback and buffering requirements. This is a potential issue where new intensive agricultural activities..abut residential development. Several land use policies in the Sonoma County General Plan are relevant to the question of expanding Rohnert Park's Sphere of Influence and providing for urban development outside the current City limits. County policy states that: • Rohnert Park and Cotati's urban service boundaries should not be amended unless: — Vacant lands within the existing boundaries can accommodate -no -more than five years of planned growth; — The service entities have sufficient capacity to serve growth stemming from..__ the expansion; and [5] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING — Natural resources and agricultural production would not be significantly affected. • Conditions may be placed on discretionary projects to minimize impacts on soil, biotic resources, and wildlife. The County's land use classifications for land outside the City limits are shown in the map on the following page. Land use classifications for the Eastside and Westside areas include: • Rural Residential. This category provides for very low density development on lands that have few if any urban services but have access to county -maintained roads. Agricultural uses maybe limited, depending on the.zoning district. The study area includes lands designated for 10- acre and 20 -acre lots. • Diverse Agricultural. This category applies where small acreage, intensive farming is the predominant use, where farming may not be the primary occupation of the farmer. It is meant to protect a full range of agricultural uses and prevent residential intrusion. Minimum parcel sizes in the study area are either 10 or 20 -acres. • Land Extensive Agriculture. This category is designed to provide the parcel sizes and densities conducive to continued agricultural production on lands that typically yield low production per acre of land. Hence, the minimum parcel size in .this category in the study area is 60 acres. The Westside also.is designated as a community separator, consistent with policies established in the Open Space Element of the County's General Plan (see discussion in following section). Open Space Element The Open Space element is a particularly important component of Sonoma: County's General Plan in that it establishes the framework for shaping and limiting.urban growth by community separators. These are areas that are adjacent to existing urban development and therefore vulnerable to future urbanization, but atthe same. time provide the distinct spaces between cities that are essential for protection of the County's rural character. The Sonoma County General Plan seeks to. protect natural -an ' d agricultural resources through definition of an appropriate development`.intesity in community separators, resulting in farmland, open space, and rural. residential uses in .the separators. Santa Rosa Urban Boundary Land Extensive Agriculture 0 Diverse Agriculture Rural Residential Low Density Residential ® Public/Institutional r—� Resources and Rural L Development _ Commercial 0 Industrial City of Cotati 0 Community Separator Source: Sonoma County General Plan, 1989, Figure LU -5g; City of Rohnert Park General Plan, 1995, Figure 6.1; City of Santa Rosa General Plan, 1996, Land Use Diagram. Sonoma County and Adjacent Jurisdictions Land Use Designations ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Community separators are shown in the Open Space element between Rohnert Park/Cotati and Petaluma, and between Rohnert Park and Santa Rosa along Stony Point Road, within the western portion of the Study Area. Policy directions established by the County for community separators include: • Avoid annexation or inclusion of community separator land in spheres of influence for water/sewer, and avoid General Plan amendments -that -would increase residential densities over one unit per ten acres in community separators. Greater density than designated may be permitted by the Board of Supervisors on a case-by-case basis, conditioned on permanent open space protection and -other public'benefits, clustering, availability of adequate infrastructure and services, and compatibility with neighboring uses (particularly agricultural): Special consideration is to be given for parcel aggregation, creative financing for open space, and provision of pedestrian and .bicycle links. • Community separators are to be placed in a Scenic Resources combining district, and development is subject to other requirements for screening, clustering, and preservation of trees and land forms. • Community separators may be eligible for voluntary transfer of development rights or purchase of development rights programs, with the property owner's consent. The -County-has .designated Highway.101 and Petaluma Hill Road as scenic corridors. Scenic corridors are subject to the requirements of the County's Scenic Resources combining district, and carry additional setback and screening requirements. Rural scenic corridors require a setback of 30 percent or 200 feet, whichever is smaller, and a 20 -foot setback is required along scenic corridors in urban service areas. Neither the Westside or the Eastside planning areas are within critical habitat areas designated by the County; however, the Westside has been identified as a potential habitat site of unknown quality in the Santa Rosa Plain Vernal Pool Ecosystem Preservation Plan (June 1995). Further analysis of these environmental resources is being conducted for -the City's General Plan Update. The Laguna de Santa Rosa drainageway is also not a designated critical habitat, although, the drainage way is lined with native vegetation, and pollutants entering the drainageway have the potential to impact the Laguna.de Santa Rosa itself. Critical habitat areas designated by the County are within the Biotic Resources combining district and subject to special impact assessment, as well as a 50 -foot minimum building setback from all wetlands areas. Coleman Creek in the -east study area and Crane Creek just north of the study area are classified riparian corridors, subject to a 100 -foot streamside conservation area setback. ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING The study area is in a major groundwater basin and contains major groundwater recharge areas, according to the Resource Conservation Element. Applicable 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan Policies and Standards: Use drainage canal and creek right-of-ways for permanent open space and compatible purposes including stormwater drainage, trails and bikepaths, wildlife habitat and native plant landscaping. • To associate public open space with waterways running through the city, the waterways should incorporate landscaping, bike and walking paths and exercise stations in their development. Agricultural Resources Element The Sonoma County General Plan has an Agricultural Resources Element, with a goal of maintaining agricultural production on farmlands at urban edges but beyond urban service area boundaries. Agricultural Resources policies control the extension of urban services to lands capable of supporting agriculture and prevent the conflicts between agriculture and urban uses that would harm agricultural production. Policies specifically _address the role of LAFCO in urban expansion, requiring that cities prepare a written report to LAFCO on the consistency of expanding urban services with the County General Plan and encouraging LAFCO to require a finding that expansion would either not occur at the expense of agriculture, or that the community's need for development is paramount in the proposed location. While the County's plan is careful to protect agricultural uses, it does not fully acknowledge the interaction between urban residential areas and agriculture just outside city limits. Although buffering is required for homes being developed adjacent to farms, the County requires no such buffering to be put in place by farmers when a new agricultural use is established next to a residential area. As a result of this omission, conflicts between agricultural and residential uses are not completely avoided. Consistent with the Sonoma County plan, LAFCO has adopted a policy not to approve annexation of land in a community separator: The County has an Agricultural Preservation and Open Space District, funded by a quarter -cent sales tax, with preservation of lands in community separators as a -major goal. The Westside study area is within the Rohnert Park -Santa Rosa community separator. In addition, Williamson Act designations apply to the parcels in both the Eastside and the Westside study areas. Applicable 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan Policies and Standards • Areas in the City planning area should be maintained in agricultural and open space uses consistent with the land use designation in the Sonoma County General Plan. [9] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING • Encourage Sonoma County, the Agricultural Preservation and Open Space District, and other entities to implement the community separator policies in the Sonoma County General Plan and the District's Open Space Acquisition Plan. COTATI GENERAL PLAN Cotati's 1985-2005 General Plan is currently being updated; policies and projected buildout in the plan are likely to change in the update process. The map:of plans of adjacent jurisdictions (following page 7) shows future land use for areas adjacent to the City of Rohnert Park under the current plan. The current General Plan calls for a population of 8,793 in Cotati in 2005, a figure that is based on an.assumed Growth Management Program limitation of 75. new units per year. The population at the time of General Plan preparation was 4,080 within the City limits and 4,950 in the sphere of influence. The plan emphasizes development of vacant and underutilized land within the City limits. Annexation can only occur when land within the City limits is unsuitable or insufficient to meet "current land use needs." When the plan was prepared, Cotati had only 370-470 sewer allotments remaining, and the plan stated that additional building permits were not to be issued once the sewage treatment plant capacity had been exceeded. However, the Housing Element calls for development of 649 new units, assuming some annexation of land within the sphere of influence in the 1995-2005 period. In general, no project can be approved until it is shown that adequate infrastructure capacity is available. Infrastructure improvements are to occur concurrently with development. Cotati is currently experiencing relatively high levels of development activity, with 157 units and 132,300 square feet of commercial space in planning, under review, or approved as of March 1997. Designated land uses closest to Rohnert Park's study areas are primarily rural residential at one unit per acre, with limited agricultural uses.and some associated neighborhood retail. A specific plan is to be prepared for the area between Gravenstein Highway and. Derby Lane; no potential uses for the area are identified in the General Plan. Applicable 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan Policies and Standards: • Continue to work with the City of Cotati concerning land use impacts between the two cities. SANTA ROSA GENERAL PLAN AND GROWTH MANAGEMENT ORDINANCE The Santa Rosa General Plan aims to protect open space and low density uses in the City's southern.Sphere of Influence, which borders on Rohnert Park. West of Highway 101 at the northern border of the Westside planning area, the Santa Rosa General Plan calls for Country Residential, with a minimum lot size of five acres (see map following page 6). 'East of Highway 101, the predominant land use is Very Low Density, with lot sizes [10] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING between 0.5 and 5 acres. Outside the urban boundary, designated land uses recognize and are generally consistent with the Sonoma County General Plan. The Santa Rosa General Plan states that General Plan designations are intended to be permanent, and areas in a very low density classification are not reserved for future development. More intense development could occur in the southeast development area .between Todd Road, Petaluma Hill Road, and Santa Rosa Avenue. However, the Santa Rosa General Plan states that development may not occur before 2010, and would require a detailed land use plan. The Santa Rosa General Plan identifies Santa Rosa's ultimate urban boundary, as well as the planning area where the City has no existing or future jurisdiction. Major urban boundary changes can only be made during the five-year General Plan update process. Plan policy is to encourage preservation of community separators between Santa Rosa and neighboring communities, and to support protection of agricultural lands in the planning area outside the urban boundary. In 1995, the Santa Rosa Urban Boundary contained 58,300 units and 149,600 persons. 2020 buildout is projected at 189,500 persons within the urban boundary. Ultimately, the urban boundary can accommodate a population of 201,000. Growth Management Ordinance The City. of Santa Rosamaintains.a growth management program that limits residential building permits to 1,000 per year until 2000, 900 per year between 2001 and 2005, and 850 per year from 2006 to 2010. Fifty percent of these entitlements must be designated for less conventional housing types such as second units, units in mixed use projects, qualifying units (limited lot size and building square feet) and affordable to low or very low income households. Such units may also receive allotments from the fifty percent of entitlements designated for market -rate units if the initial fifty percent are used. If all entitlements for alternative housing are not used within a given year, they may be transferred for use in subsequent years. Conversely, unused market -rate unit entitlements are generally.restricted to projects that achieve City objectives, as defined by the Council. SONOMA STATE UNIVERSITY Nestled in the West Side study area, Sonoma State University's growth is closely related to growth issues in Rohnert Park itself University students, faculty and staff are a part of the Rohnert Park community, providing population, a specialized housing demand, and a labor pool, and are also_users .of the city's roads, water, and sewer. capacity. The first Master Plan for Sonoma State was prepared for the brand-new campus in 1962; however, the first buildings completed in 1966 were not well-received by the community of students and faculty that had developed in the intervening four years. A subsequent Master Plan was prepared in 1969 to accommodate future growth and development ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING within a "Cluster School" concept. Although this plan was relevant at the time, its growth projections and development concept have -since become obsolete. The 1992 Sonoma State University Master Plan was prepared to make facility planning consistent with the elimination of the cluster concept, to identify parking sites for 10,000 full-time students, and to add and enhance campus entryways. Under:the master, plan, 880,000 square feet of classrooms and facilities will be added to the existing 937,063 square feet of space in campus buildings, a 94 percent increase in building area. The current enrollment at Sonoma State is 7,000 students, which includes both full-time and part-time students. This: corresponds to a full-time equivalent or FTE of 5600 students. Enrollment at Sonoma State University is expected to increase. to .10,000 FTEat ultimate campus buildout. The shorter term growth projection is for a 27 percent increase to 7,100 FTE students in 2003-2004. Sonoma State University currently has no plans to increase its ultimate campus build out population beyond 10,000, although there were discussions many years ago -about the potential campus size of 15,000. However, according to the President'.s office',there is no official direction for the campus -planners to prepare a new long-term campus plan for a higher population. In the near term, Sonoma State University has two projects that will have any impact on the community. First, this winter, the University will break ground for a new information technology center and library to be housed in a 215,000 square foot facility. This $38 million project is financed by state and private funds and $5 million from the Rohnert Park School District. Over the long-term, the University intends to increase the total amount of on -campus housing available. A feasibility and market study is being initiated to help campus planners decide what specifically can be done. Near-term plans might be for 400 units in the next three to five years, while over a longer-term, there could be 800 to 1000 additional student living units located on the Sonoma State University campus. FUTUREGROWTH PROJECTIONSTOR ROHNERT PARK A series of ABAG projections, from Projections `90 to the -draft Projections `98, were examined to understand the evolution of growth in Rohnert Park over. the 1990s. After several increases in the projected population during the early 1990s, the City's decision to establish coterminous city limits and sphere of influence boundaries led to a subsequent decreases in the City's projected population. The most notable increases in projections over time have been in jobs; employment estimates for 2000 and beyond have differed by as many as 5,000 jobs between Projections `90 and draft Projections `98. Most notably, where once Rohnert Park wasprojected to '. Lyn McIntire, President's Office, SSU, personal communication, September 29, 1997. [12] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING retain its "commuter" status where jobs exceeded employed residents by over 4,000, the City's jobs are now expected to outnumber -employed residents by a factor of 1.2 to 1. Table 2 presents the latest, and only available, ABAG projections for the planning horizon year of 2015. ABAG assumes expansion of Rohnert Park's sphere of influence and City boundaries at some point during the planning period, as well as expansion of infrastructure capacity. As the table shows, the majority of Rohnert Park's jobs are expected to be in the retail and services sectors. Table 2 ABAG YEAR 2015 PROJECTIONS 'State Department of Finance Estimate 'Includes retail and services jobs. 'ABAG 1995 estimate. Source. Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) ABAG's projections over time (from Projections `90 to the draft Projections `98) for Rohnert Park's 2005 population exceed 2005 estimates in the Sonoma County General Plan by at least 2,400 residentsand4,800 jobs (compare Table 1 and 2). The County_ _ General Plan's relatively low estimate for Rohnert Park's 2005 population is not based on an underestimate of the city's growth rate..In fact, the County -General Plan assumes a 34 percent increase in-Rohnert Park's population between 1990 and 2005,. while the ABAG - .' projections forecast growth between 21 and 27 percent for the same time period. The difference lies in the fact that the County's estimate of Rohnert Park's 1990 population _ (31,500 residents) is significantly lower than the actual 1990 population found in the most recent census (36,373 within the ABAG-defined sphere of influence). On an annual basis, ABAG's projections represent an 1.5 percent growth rate. According to Projections `96, the population for the Urban South portion of Sonoma County (including Rohnert Park, Cotati, Petaluma, and Santa Rosa) will exceed the potential units that -can :be constructed under local policies by 6,350 units. This deficit is largely due to growth management policies in many communities. In addition, the projections extend beyond the time frames of many local plans. ABAG's projections also Existing (1997)' Projections `96 Draft Projections `98 Growth.Rate (%/gr.) Projection `98 Population 38,707 49,200 51,000 1.54 Households 14,645 18,400 19,400 1.57 Employed Residents 21,100' 24,800 28,600 1.53 Jobs 19,970' 36,720 35,010 2.85 Manufacturing 10,570 N/A N/A Services' 18,760 N/A N/A - 'State Department of Finance Estimate 'Includes retail and services jobs. 'ABAG 1995 estimate. Source. Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) ABAG's projections over time (from Projections `90 to the draft Projections `98) for Rohnert Park's 2005 population exceed 2005 estimates in the Sonoma County General Plan by at least 2,400 residentsand4,800 jobs (compare Table 1 and 2). The County_ _ General Plan's relatively low estimate for Rohnert Park's 2005 population is not based on an underestimate of the city's growth rate..In fact, the County -General Plan assumes a 34 percent increase in-Rohnert Park's population between 1990 and 2005,. while the ABAG - .' projections forecast growth between 21 and 27 percent for the same time period. The difference lies in the fact that the County's estimate of Rohnert Park's 1990 population _ (31,500 residents) is significantly lower than the actual 1990 population found in the most recent census (36,373 within the ABAG-defined sphere of influence). On an annual basis, ABAG's projections represent an 1.5 percent growth rate. According to Projections `96, the population for the Urban South portion of Sonoma County (including Rohnert Park, Cotati, Petaluma, and Santa Rosa) will exceed the potential units that -can :be constructed under local policies by 6,350 units. This deficit is largely due to growth management policies in many communities. In addition, the projections extend beyond the time frames of many local plans. ABAG's projections also ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING cite infrastructure constraints on both short- and long-term growth in the Urban South portion of Sonoma County, noting that the projections assume resolution of capacity constraints for roads, water, sewers, and schools. Sewage capacity constraints relate to both treatment and outflow. Employment Rohnert Park's employment has far exceeded early expectations.. Recent projections outpace earlier projections and County estimates by over 5,000 jobs. By 1990, Rohnert Park had only 3,000 fewer jobs than the County had predicted for 2005. According to - Projections `96' and the draft Projections `98; jobs in Rohnert Park are expected to exceed the number of employed residents by 2000. The projected growth rate for jobs is 2.85 percent per year. [14] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING 3. COMMUNITY FACILITIES, UTILITIES AND SERVICES This chapter describes existing and planned services in Rohnert Park, particularly noting deficiencies and standards that may affect future growth and expansion of the urban area. Information on utilities and services is drawn from the 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan, the 1995 Draft Environmental Impact Report for the City of Rohnert Park General Plan Amendment and Update, and various. -service -specific' reports and plans, supplemented by more current information provided by the City, the school districts and providers of water and wastewater treatment service, PARKS AND COMMUNITY FACILITIES Rohnert Park is well -endowed with parks.and community facilities, and neighborhood parks and schools are centerpieces in the neighborhoods. The City also has two golf courses, sports facilities, a performing arts center, civic center, library and other community facilities for youth and seniors. The land allocated for parks and community facilities and schools totals 632 acres (see map on the following page). Parks themselves occupy 89 acres, while 43 acres are allocated to community facilities. Rohnert Park's existing recreation facilities include 14 parks, 9 mini -parks, and playgrounds, ballfields, soccer fields, tennis courts, and basketball courts at schools. In addition, the City has four pools. In the near term, park improvements will focus on improvement of the Magnolia Park. The current General Plan also calls for creation of a third public golf course by 2010; this would have to be located outside the current urban area because no sites exist for a third golf course within the City. Rohnert Park's service standard is ten acres of parkland, open space, school, or community facility per 1,000 population; the current supply could.therefore supporta population of 63,200. The specific park standard requires a five -acre neighborhood park for each 5,000 -resident neighborhood. . . . Applicable 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan Policies and Standards • One regional park of at least 50 acres within five miles of the center of Rohnert -Park shall be deemed sufficient to meet the needs of a population of 50,000. Generally, there should be one. swimming pool for each 10,000 residents. At least one indoor sports center complex shall be deemed sufficient for a Population of 50,000. •. One animal shelter facility shall be deemed sufficient for a population of 50,000. [ 151 as, School Par k/Golf Course/Recreational Facility a Source: Gty of Kohnert Park Genual Plan, 1995. Parks and Schools ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING • One City Hall or Civic Center shall be deemed sufficient for a population of approximately 50,000. • One Community Center shall be deemed sufficient for a population of approximately 50,000. • _ One Performing Arts Center shall be deemed sufficient for a population of approximately 50,000. • One Library/Learning Center shall be deemed sufficient for a population of approximately 50,000. • To provide adequate and easily accessible areas for active and passive recreation for residents, the parks and schools should be associated spatially to serve each neighborhood. • If financially feasible, create a third public golf course by 2010. SCHOOLS Two school districts serve the City and adjacent unincorporated land: the Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District, which oversees essentially all of incorporated Cotati and Rohnert Park, as well as the Eastside study area, and the Bellevue Union School District/Santa Rosa High School District, with jurisdiction in the Westside study area and rural areas north of the City. Rohnert Park schools are under the authority of the Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District. The District operates 12 schools, a continuation high school, and an alternative secondary program, for a total capacity of 8,175 students; the September 1997 enrollment is 7,835 students. School locations are shown in the map on the preceding page. As in .many cities, the District and the City work closely to provide complementary services, co - locating schools and parks and realizing other economieslof:scaledn educational service provision. Current school capacity and enrollment are shown in Table 3. The District recently completed a school facility analysis and justification report for school facility fees, which analyzed facility needs resulting from projected development in the City and, in turn, considered the effect of school fees on residential, commercial and industrial development. The school facility.analysis assumed that new demand for school facilities will grow fromboth residential development and the commercial.and industrial k development that encourages, workers to locate in the District. Without enrollment from new development; the District will have a significantly reduced need for facility expansion and construction, particularly.in the southeast and, in the future, the east area. ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Table 3 COTATI-ROHNERT PARK UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT ENROLLMENT AND CAPACITY The facility needs analysis was based on the following assumptions: • There will be 2,000 additional housing units in the District by 2010, 1,750 of which would be located in Rohnert Park. Anticipated average home size is 1,710 square feet, and the assumed student generation rate is 0.43 students per home. • Although regional forecasts call for over 3 million square feet of nonresidential development in the District through, 20 10,- the assumed amount of additional [i8] Capacity Remaining (excluding temp. 1996-97 Capacity/ School Location classrooms) Enrollment (Deficit) Elementary Crane, Richard Rohnert Park 386 370 16 Evergreen Rohnert Park 530 467 63 Gold Ridge Rohnert Park 430 403 27 Hahn, Marguerite Rohnert Park 530 499 31 La Fiesta Rohnert Park 425 385 40 Monte Vista Rohnert Park 630 611 19 Page, Thomas Cotati 470 461 9 Reed, John Rohnert Park 480 450 30 Rohnert, Waldo Rohnert Park 365 353 12 Subtotal 4,240 3,999 241 Middle Creekside Rohnert Park 950 940 10 (eastside study area) Mountain Shadows Rohnert Park 950 929 21 Subtotal 1,900 1,869 31 High Rancho Cotate Rohnert Park 1,850 1,789 61 Phoenix Rohnert Park 35 32 .3 El Camino 150 146 4 Total 8,175 7,835 340 Source: 'Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District School Facility Analysis and Justification Reportfor School Facility Fees The facility needs analysis was based on the following assumptions: • There will be 2,000 additional housing units in the District by 2010, 1,750 of which would be located in Rohnert Park. Anticipated average home size is 1,710 square feet, and the assumed student generation rate is 0.43 students per home. • Although regional forecasts call for over 3 million square feet of nonresidential development in the District through, 20 10,- the assumed amount of additional [i8] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING commercial and industrial space is 1 million square feet. Approximately 25 percent of employees in the Cotati=Rohnert Park area were assumed to also live in the area, occupying 0.60 homes per worker (to compensate for multi -worker households). An additional adjustment was applied to reflect workers who create no additional school needs and workers who occupy new homes, for which a fee will already be paid. The District projects 8,004 students to be enrolled in 2010-11, which is less than a one percent increase over the current enrollment. However, school improvements are recommended based on the geographic shift of students towards the east side of Rohnert Park; any decreases in students from older parts of the community would allow for removal of temporary space, but would not be well -located to serve new homes. The facility analysis recommends the following improvements for Rohnert Park schools: • Replacement of five rooms at M. Hahn elementary school; • Addition of five rooms at Monte Vista for current and future needs; ® Addition of two rooms at Thomas Page for current needs; • Construction of a new elementary school on the Eastside; and • Expansion of Rancho Cotate High School. The projected total cost of needed improvements is $7.4 million, of which $5.8 million (78 percent) is allocated to new development. With an assumed expansion of 2,000 homes, this cost results in a needed impact fee of $1.69 per new residential square foot. The current fee of $1.65 per square foot would provide $5.6 million, or 98 percent of the needed revenues. As calculated, the cost impact of almost all types of commercial and industrial development exceed the $0.30 per_square foot in commercial.and industrial impact fees allowed by the state. With nonresidential development assumed at 1 million square feet -by 2010, the maximum possible revenue is $306,000. Even considering the additional fees gained from workers living in new homes, for which a residential impact fee will be levied, the calculated cost of $905,715 for students stemming from new residential and commercial development far exceeds potential revenues. The.Bellevue Union School District currently operates two schools (Bellevue..and Kawana) with a total enrollment of 1,351 students. Accgrding to district staff, they are operating at capacity. A third school, Meadow View.School,.is under construction. Although its capacity has not been finally determined, .ft will provide for approximately 450 students according to district staff. Over the next ten years, Bellevue Union School District intends to construct two additional schools: one west of Dutton Meadow Avenue and one in -the Yolanda Street (19] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING area. The district's facilities and funds are deemed sufficient to meet existing and projected needs if the construction program can be realized. In non -annexation areas, the district levies fees of $1.84 per square foot of residential buildings; in annexation areas, the fees are based on a Mutual Benefit Agreement, which provides for $3.14 per square foot of residential space. Applicable 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan Policies and Standards • Continue to work cooperatively with the Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District so that planning growth of the city is coordinated with the planning and growth of the District. • Two middle school campuses shall be deemed sufficient to meet the needs of a population of 50,000. • Generally, there should be one elementary school campus for each 5,000 residents. • To provide adequate and easily accessible areas for active and passive recreation for residents, the parks and schools should be associated spatially to serve each neighborhood. PUBLIC SAFETY Rohnert Park receives its police and fire services from the Department of Public Safety (DPS), which operates under a mutual aid agreement with Sonoma County citiess-andfire districts. This combined approach, which provides for additional staffing for emergencies and special events, saves the City an estimated $3 million annually, according to the 1995 Draft EIR for the City of Rohnert Park General Plan Amendment and Update. The DPS had 54 officers in 1995, trained to respond to both fire and police calls; the staffing is based on a standard of 1.1 officers per 1,000 population, a staff level that allows for a three- to six -minute response time for emergency calls and a three- to fifteen -minute response time for nonemergency calls. Rohnert Park has four public safety stations, located on Southwest Boulevard, Country Club Drive, City Hall Drive, and Maurice Avenue. There are currently no plans for additional stations; however, a station west of Highway 101 would be needed to serve development in the Westside study area. For police service, the city is divided into three beats and one cover unit. The department also employs "community policing" in which businesses and residences are contacted periodically. Residential and commercial areas receive similar services, and neither land use requires unusual levels of coverage. There are no specific areas of concern for police officials. Current service levels are four minutes for initial response and seven minutes for back-up response. [201 ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING The Department's priorities are established in the 1995-1999 Strategic Plan. The plan calls for actions related to analyzing needs for personnel and service management and technology upgrades. In general, the Department will direct its efforts towards maintaining the current level of services efficiently. No specific expansions are identified in the strategic plan. The plan focuses on employee training and increased efficiency to address the -issues brought on by additional growth. Applicable 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan Policies and Standards • One public safety station housing fire fighting equipment shall be established for each 12,000 residents. WASTEWATER SERVICES Wastewater from Rohnert Park is treated at the.Laguna Water Reclamation Treatment Plant, .operated by the City of Santa Rosa. The capacity of wastewater treatment and discharge systems is currently being addressed in the Santa Rosa Subregional Long-term Wastewater Project. A Draft Environmental Impact Report has been completed and circulated for public review, and decisions have been made on interim measures. Decisions on`long-term options maybe made later this fall. The Rohnert Park Wastewater Pump Station, which sends Rohnert Park's wastewater to the Laguna Water Reclamation Treatment Plant, and the water treatment plant itself have been designed to provide sufficient capacity to -accommodate existing development within the current city limits. This treatment capacity is allocated to jurisdictions participating in the Subregional System; .the City currently has a right to have 3.84 million gallons a day (mgd) of wastewater treated by the system. However, to accommodate the average dry weather flows from existing development in the City, plus development that has been approved (permits issued but buildings not yet occupied), the City needs at least 0.255 mgd of additional treatment capacity. Buildout under the current General Plan plus provision for development at Sonoma State University and in Cotati (both subcontract for treatment through the City of Rohnert Park) would increase the need for additional treatment capacity to 0.8 mgd. The City currently is negotiating with the City of Santa Rosa for this additional treatment capacity, but as of September 1997, no decision has been made. The Laguna Water Reclamation Treatment Plant provides primary, secondary, and tertiary treatment of wastewater. Reclaimed -water is used for irrigation of agricultural and urban area at all times except when wet weather prevents the practice. In Rohnert Park, reclaimed -water is used to irrigate golf courses, school -grounds, parks, and landscaping. During wet weather, reclaimed water is stored in ponds and, if the ponds become full, -discharged to the Laguna de Santa Rosa and, ultimately, the ocean via the Russian River. In December -1988, the capacity.was expanded from 15 to 18-mgd for dry weather, with a 75 mgd pumping capacity. Expansion to a treatment capacity of 21.2 . mgd is planned. Rohnert Park is currently entitled to use 3.84 mgd of capacity, which will [21] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING expand to 4.65 mgd with the additional capacity. Table 4 shows Rohnert Park area wastewater treatment capacity needs. - Table 4 WASTEWATER TREATMENT CAPACITY 1996 Average Dry Weather Flow (August) Entitlements Town of Cotati Sonoma State University City of Rohnert Park Remaining Rohnert Park.Area Capacity (derived from measured and estimated flows) (deficit) Additional capacity needed for development within Rohnert Park City limits under current General Plan Additional capacity needed for Sonoma State University and Cotati Total additional capacity needed' 'Includes 0.05 mgd for contingencies. Source: City of Rohnert Park. 4.07 mgd 0.62 mgd 0.10 mgd 3.116 mgd (0.255) mgd 0.15 mgd 0.11 mgd 0.80 While treatment capacity constraints can be addressed through expansion, discharge quality and capacity are more closely regulated through the National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit process. The Regional Water Quality Control Board has limited the amount of treated wastewater that can be discharged into the Russian River. Use of reclaimed water for irrigation helps reduce the amount of water discharged to the River. Within the City, -infrastructure is in place to facilitate use ofreclaimed water for irrigation; see map on the following page. Extensions of existing lines will provide additional opportunities for irrigation, not only for publicly owned land but also for irrigated agricultural lands on-the.Eastside along Petaluma Hill Road. The second map following this page shows -the irrigated agricultural land identified in the EIR for the Santa Rosa Subregional Wastewater Project for the South County Reclamation Alternative. No decision has been made as to whether this alternative will be a preferred alternative, to be included in the project that will ultimately be implemented. Wastewater Treatment and Disposal The City of Santa Rosa has recently certified an Environmental Impact Report (EIR) to bring the Subregional disposal system into compliance and to expand the treatment plani and the disposal system for the future. Information/reports on this project are contained'. in a 23 -volume EIR; one of which is available in the Rohnert Park -Library. The treatment. [221 ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING plant expansion element of this work simply involves replacement of the influent pumps at the headworks. The remaining upgrade work to the treatment plant is in the final phases of construction at this time. It is not known at this point what additional work would be necessary to upgrade the treatment plant further, but the majority of the treatment processes have been designed conservatively. Upon the completion of the upgrade, process performance evaluation tests will be conducted by the City of Santa Rosa to determine the limiting processes and a plan for further treatment plant upgrades .can be developed.' Four disposal options currently are being.considered: two reclamation projects, a Geysers recharge.alternative and an increased Russian River discharge alternative. The Board of Public Utilities is deliberating on project selection, and it is anticipated that a proposed project will be sent to the Santa Rosa City Council for funding before the end of 1997. The .City of Santa Rosa through the Santa Rosa Subregional Wastewater Management System has no problems meeting the state water quality discharge requirements. As long as the state's regulatory requirements do not change, the City of Santa Rosa anticipates that its treatment processes will continue to meet all water quality discharge requirements indefinitely.' The.Santa Rosa Subregional Wastewater Management System has programs to reduce the volume and.improve the quality of wastewater from industrial and biotech users. With regard to water quality, the system has created the Sonoma Green Business Program which recognizes and advertises industries that achieve a pollution reduction and meet all standards. Additionally, Santa Rosa City staff is currently working with printers and restaurants to develop Best Management Practices. City staff also consults with individual businesses on specific problems. With regard to water quantity, the City of Santa Rosa conducts water audits at the request of business and develops plans to help reduce the amount of water used and, thus, sent to the wastewater system. In addition, the city of Santa Rosa has developed a program of rebates for industrial users of $100 for every 1,000 gallons of flow reduced. This program is currently only in Santa Rosa but could be expanded to other Subregional partners. Supplemental Environmental 'Review of Expansion of Treatment Capacity and Additional Disposal for Additional Treatment As previously noted, the EIR for the Santa Rosa Long-term Wastewater Project has been certified, and the City of Santa Rosa is now in the project selection phase. Future expansion of the treatment plant capacity beyond the proposed 3.2 MGD expansion will require supplemental environmental review. It is possible that the treatment plant will 'Letter from Miles Ferris, Director of Utilities/City Engineer, City of Santa Rosa, to Joseph Gaffney, City Engineer, City of Rohnert Park, September 23, 1997. ' Ibid. - [23) ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING have actual capacity beyond the rated capacity, but this will not be known until performance evaluation testing is conducted.' The ability to develop additional disposal capacity is directly related to the long-term project selected. The Board of Public Utilities and the Santa Rosa City Council have both directed Santa Rosa City staff to review alternatives and components of alternatives for them that provide flexibility for future expansion. However, until a project is'selected, the ability to expand the system, is not known. The City of Santa Rosa has a request from the City of Rohnert Park to provide additional expansion and disposal beyond that currently being considered. Additional capacity also will be needed for the City of Santa Rosa which has recently updated its General Plan. After a project for this phase of treatment capacity expansion and disposal is selected, a schedule will be established for the next phase of system expansion. Issues Related to Additional Development in Rohnert Park outside the Current City Limits not Addressed in the Subregional Long -Term Wastewater Project EIR The City of Santa Rosa, as the managing partner for the Subregional System, has a contractual obligation to meet the wastewater treatment and disposal needs of its Partners, including the City of Rohnert Park. Expansion of Rohnert Park outside its current city limits and/or beyond the.limits for urbanization set in the Draft 1994 Rohnert Park General Plan (the document that was used in preparation of the Long-term Wastewater Project EIR) will require additional treatment and disposal system capacity. The issues associated with developing this capacity have not yet been determined. Once a new Rohnert Park General Plan has been adopted, the City of Santa Rosa in consultation with the City of Rohnert Park would begin this process.' Applicable 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan Policies and Standards • By the end of 1999, develop capacity to treat at least 3.55 mgd of wastewater from Rohnert Park, exclusive of the City of Cotati and Sonoma State University_(ah increase of 0.44 mgd over current capacity). • To help preserve water supply, treated wastewater shall be used, where economically feasible, for irrigation of golf courses, parks, landscaped areas, agricultural lands and similar areas. • Expand wherever possible, the use of treated wastewater for irrigation purposes. • Where economically feasible, use treated wastewater for irrigation of golf courses, parks, large landscape areas, and agricultural land. ' Ibid. _ ' Ibid. [24] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING WATER SUPPLY Rohnert Park derives its water supply from 35 active wells and 8 active connections to the Sonoma County Water Agency (SCWA) Aqueduct, which supplies water from the Russian River. The map following this page shows the location of the SCWA Aqueduct and major water lines. In 1996, the City's wells produced 1,751 million gallons and the City purchased 833 million gallons from SCWA. Over the past two years, the City has purchased approximately 32 percent of its total water needs. The City's current contract with SCWA allows it to take one million gallons per day (mgd) based on a monthly average. The City has an agreement with the City of Petaluma that allows Rohnert Park to take delivery of excess water not needed by the City of Petaluma. In 1991, the City of Petaluma entered into an agreement with the North Marin Water District (NMWD) to allow the district to take excess water from Petaluma's contract allocation in exchange for permission to connect to the NMWD aqueduct. Since then, Rohnert Park has received yearly permission from NMWD to use excess allocation. SCWA staff also stated that they will supply Rohnert Park for the foreseeable future as long as they have productive capacity to do so. SCWA is preparing a plan for future a water supply and transmission system that is currently under environmental review. This plan would provide for the City of Rohnert Park to take up to 15 mgd from the SCWA system. The City's intent is to purchase its water from SCWA for daily needs, and rely on the wells as standby sources for emergency use, for example. Single family residential users in the City are charged a flat rate for water service regardless of the amount used. Within the City, 964 connections are metered, while the remaining 7,331 connections are unmetered. The City also has an active program to encourage water conservation. The City provides low flow toilets and other devices free - of -charge. All of the water from the City's well is disinfected, and all applicable water quality monitoring requirements are met, according to the June 1997 Water System Inspection. Report, prepared by the City for the California Department of Health Services Division.'of Drinking Water and Environmental Health. There is one pressure zone in the City, and typical pressures are maintained in a range from 30 to 60 pounds per square inch (psi), averaging in the mid-40s. This water pressure is more than adequate year-round to maintain adequate pressure for fire fighting. Planned improvements, such as additional connections to the SCWA aqueduct, connector mains, storage tanks, and wells will help maintain minimum pressure above 30 pounds per square inch. Applicable 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan Policies and Standards • Obtain additional water supply so as to assure at least 2.4 billion gallons in 1995 and 2.9 billion gallons in 2000 without having to pump additional amounts of. well water. [251 Aqueduct ® Reclaimed Water Line o Sewer Line Source: City of Rohnert Park: Department of Public Works, 1997 Water and Wastewater System Proposed Pump Station Proposed Pipeline Proposed Irrigation Source: Santa Rosa Subregional Long-term Wastewater Project, Selection Workbook, 1997, Alternative 1 -South County Reclamation Santa Rosa Long-term Wastewater Project: Alternative- 2 -South County Reclamation ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING • Encourage water conservation, where applicable, so as to reduce water use by approximately 10 percent by the vear 1995. Maintain the Rohnert Park water distribution system at current performance levels. • Carry out capital improvement projects that will enhance the efficiency of the water supply system and insure adequate supplies for the future. STORM DRAINAGE Rohnert Park's storm drainage is under joint management of the City.of Rohnert Park and the SCWA. The City maintains responsibility for the system of underground pipes that serves for minor and intermediate drainage, while SCWA maintains the system of open channels that diverts major drainage flows west towards the Laguna de Santa Rosa. The drainage system and flood zones are shown in the map on the following page. To ensure that the system operates without backup during major storms, open channel cleaning is needed to clear sedimentation that can cause flooding. Applicable 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan Policies and Standards • Developers shall be required to provide adequate drainage and erosion control during construction. • Require a hydrologic -analysis of runoff and drainage from new development. SOLID AND HAZARDOUS WASTE The 1994 Sonoma County Integrated Waste Management Plan, prepared according to the requirements of Assembly Bill 939, describes the County's ability to provide adequate waste management capacity for all county jurisdictions. Waste management and disposal responsibilities are divided among several agencies in Sonoma County. The "City of - Rohnert Park is responsible for waste collections and diversion. Solid waste disposal facilities are owned and operated by the Sonoma County Department of Transportation and Public Works, which also helps maintain the waste management plan. The Sonoma County Public Health Department is the designated Local Enforcement Agency (LEA). This waste management plan consolidates the Source Reduction and Recycling Elements, Non -Disposal Facility Elements, and Household Hazardous Waste Elements prepared by. each jurisdiction in Sonoma County, and identifies solid waste disposal facilities for the county. Rohnert Park's Source Reduction and Recycling Element was completed in June 1992. In 1996, Rohnert Park diverted diverted 39 percent of its solid waste from landfills through reuse and recycling, and has established programs to meet a waste reduction goal of 53; [281 Open Channel Pipe System (48" and larger) 100 -year Flood Zone 500 -year Flood Zone Source: City of Rohnert Park General Plan, 1995, Figure 5.1; FEMA Flood Insurance Rate Map, 1991; Community Panels 060375 855 and 060375 860 Drainage -and Flood Zones ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING percent by 2000. Rohnert Park and the other Sonoma County jurisdictions established a joint powers agency (JPA) that focuses on four waste reduction and management efforts: household hazardous waste, public education, yard waste composting, and wood debris recovery. Waste hauling is franchised to a refuse hauler that also provides curbside recycling for single-family residences. The City also has a commercial recycling program. Waste is disposed in the Central Landfill, which will either need to be expanded or a new facility established. Table 5 ROHNERT PARK SOLID WASTE, 1990 Waste Disposed 38,360 tons Residential 25% Commercial 30% Industrial 28% Private haulers 17% Waste Recycled 7,906 tons Source. City of Rohner Park Source Reduction and Recycling Element, June 1992 Solid waste generated in Rohnert Park is brought to the Central Landfill in unincorporated Sonoma County, approximately five miles southwest of the city. The landfill is expected to reach capacity in 2003. The projected solid waste generation in Rohnert Park is expected to increase from 76,837 cubic yards in 1990 to 96,000 cubic yards in 2005. However, the amount of waste exported to the Central Landfill for disposal is projected to decrease from 63,937 cubic. - yards in 1990 to 44,860 cubic yards in 2005 due to source reduction and recycling. Projections for 1997 are 85,280 cubic yards of waste generated and 46,020 cubic yards exported. The City's Household Hazardous Waste Element addresses the wastes that stem from a variety of common household products, such as paint, batteries, fertilizers, and used motor oil. These wastes are of concern because they are by and large not properly. managed, resulting in injuries to sanitation workers and damage to collection vehicles, as well.as _possible toxics leaching from sanitary landfills. Rohnert Park's -household hazardous waste program emphasizes source reduction, public information, and widespread collection and recycling. Household hazardous waste is collected and disposed of by licensed haulers. In 1990, it was estimated that Rohnert Park residents generated 20 tons of hazardous waste per year. This figure is less than one [30] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING percent of the total waste stream. Per household hazardous waste generation in Rohnert Park is estimated at three pounds per year: Applicable 1995 Rohnert Park General Plan Policies and Standards • Divert from landfill disposal, 25 percent of solid waste produced in Rohnert Park by 1995 and 50 percent of solid waste produced in Rohnert Park by 2000. [31] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING 4. ENVI RON M ENTAL RESOURCES AND CONSTRAINTS This chapter summarizes environmental resources and constraints that have a bearing on future development outside the City limits, in addition to flood hazards (discussed in relation to drainage in the preceding chapter). GEOLOGY AND SEISMICITY The City lies in the Santa Rosa -Petaluma Valley where the underlying geologic structure is characterized by sediments deposited by streams on floodplains, alluvial deposits and basins. This geologic structure is depicted in the map on the following page. The nearest active fault capable of producing a large earthquake is the Rodgers Creek fault; Rohnert Park also would be affected by seismic activity caused by the San Andreas fault, and other faults in the Bay area, depending on the magnitude and duration of the seismic event.. Secondary seismic hazards that could affect Rohnert Park include ground -shaking, liquefaction and ground settlement. Liquefaction would occur when soils lose their bearing capacity during a seismic event if they are saturated with water. Resulting ground failure, including ground settlement, cracking and warping, can cause damage to buildings. The potential for liquefaction depends on the susceptibility of soils and near -surface deposits to liquefaction and the likelihood of ground motions induced by the seismic event to exceed specified threshold levels. The map of Liquefaction Susceptibility, which follows the Geology map, shows this potential, in ranges reflectingdegrees of potential severity. Soils within the planning area are almost entirely Clear Lake clays over alluvial fan deposits, so the risk of seismic damage is relatively uniform throughout the City. Lands on the Eastside, though, are relatively less susceptible to liquefaction potential than lands on the Westside. The importance of considering liquefaction potential in long-term planning and in building design was underscored by the 1969 Santa Rosa earthquake, which demonstrated that severe damage can occur where young alluvium make up the surface layer. Similar conditions are present in Rohnert Park, although only minor damage was reported during the 1969 quake because the epicenter was in Santa Rosa and the magnitude of the earthquake was only 5.6 and 5.7 on the Richter scale. (By contrast, the. 1989 Loma Prieta quake that affected the Bay Bridge and the Cypress freeway structure in Oakland had a magnitude of 7. 1.) The City has adopted the Uniform Building Code, which mandates earthquake resistant construction. Moreover, there are no, buildings within the City that are constructed of unreinforced masonry, which would be considered hazardous in the event of a major earthquake. [32] CITY or ROHNERT PARK . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . % . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ow— r--- 7 7 ... . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .............. ........... 7-...... W. -w X ANI : ...... ........... .... . . ................ X. Latest Holocene flood plain and basin deposits pliers Holocene basin deposits Holocene fan deposits Late Pleistocene to Holocene alluvium, undifferentiated Late Pleistocene fan deposits Early or middle Pleistocene alluvium Pre -Quaternary deposits and bedrock. Includes Quaternary landslides Source: William Lettis & Associates, 1994, Maps ihowing Quaternary Geology and Liquefaction Susceptibility in the Napa, California, 1:100,000 Sheet ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING SOILS AND AGRICULTURAL RESOURCES Outside the City limits, the California Department of Conservation has mapped farmland resources. The mapping classifications established by the department are: Prime Farmland: land that has the best combination of physical and chemical characteristics for the production of crops. It `has the soil quality, growing season, and moisture supply needed to produce sustained high yields of crops when treated and managed, including water management, according to current farming methods. Prime farmland must have been used for the production of irrigated crops at some time during the two update cycles prior to the mapping date. Prime Farmland does not include publicly owned lands for which there is an adopted policy preventing agricultural use. • Farmland of Statewide Importance: land similar to Prime Farmland, but with minor shortcomings, such as greater slopes or less ability to hold and store moisture. Farmland of Statewide Importance must have been used for the production of irrigated crops at some time during the two update cycles prior to the mapping date. • Farmland of Local Importance: land of importance to the local agricultural economy, as determined by each county's board of supervisors and local advisory committees. Examples of Farmland of Local Importance could include dairies, dryland farming, aquaculture, and uncultivated areas with soils qualifying for Prime Farmland and Farmland of Statewide Importance. As shown in the map on the following page, land in the southern half of the Westside study area is considered Prime Farmland and, as such, potentially worthy of protection as an agricultural resource. Reclaimed .wastewater has been used to irrigate .this property. On the City's eastside, the open land generally is classified as Farmland of Local Importance, except for isolated parcels north of Keiser Road. With irrigation, as proposed by the Santa Rosa Subregional Long-term Wastewater Project, this classification could change because the soils are classified as Class II and suitable for agriculture. The map following the Important Farmland map shows the soils found in the two study areas, their capability for -agricultural production (generally Class II) and the shrink -swell potential. Class II lands are considered suitable for field and forage crops and certain row crops. Erosion potential is not considered a significant problem: the Soil Conservation Service rating for erosion, potential is low. ® Prime Farmland Farmland of Statewide Importance p Farmland of Local Importance :Grazing Land. Urban and Built-up Land Other Land Source: California Department of Conservation, Farmland Mapping and Monitoring Program, 1996, Sonoma County Important Farmland 1994. Important Farmland antutra- SWELL EROSION SOIL UNIT CAPABILITY POTENTIAL POTENTIAL Clear Lake clay loam, IIs -5 High .Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service and ..Soil Conservation Service, in cooperation with University of California, Agricultural Experiment Station, 1972, Soil Survey; Sonoma County, Cadfornia. 0 to 2 percent slopes CeA Clear Lake clay, IIs -5 High Not a 0 to 2 percent slopes Hazard Clear Lake clay, onded, IIIw-5 0 to 2 percent slopes High Soil Types, Capability, loam, shallow, wet, IVw-3 hperrc Low Expansiveness and 0 tot percent slopes Riverwash VIIIw-4 N/A Erosion -Potential ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING BIOLOGICAL RESOURCES Biological resources are pertinent to the General Plan Update and planning for the Westside and Eastside study areas. To provide base line information, resource assessment was undertaken by Wetlands Research Associates, using information collected from (1) existing maps, aerial photographs, and databases; (2) agency contacts; and (3) field reconnaissance. The information collected is depicted on maps on the following pages, which rank wildlife habitat, wetlands, and vernal pool/rare plant habitat as having low, moderate, or high potential for occurring in various portions of the Study Area. Key findings are summarized in the following sections. EXISTING CONDITIONS Westside Study Area. The Westside study area is predominantly agricultural land with scattered farm buildings and ranchettes. The agricultural areas include parcels that have beenput into crop production, mowed, disced, and/or grazed. This area -also includes abandoned agricultural fields with ruderal vegetation including pockets of hydrophytic vegetation often associated with wetlands. . Eastside Study Area. The Eastside study area contains agricultural land with a few farm buildings, a new school, two riparian zones along Crane and Coleman Creeks north of .Sonoma State University,- a driving range, extensive "ranchette" development, and some undeveloped land south of the University. The agricultural areas include parcels used for crop production that are currently mowed and/or disced and other parcels used for grazing. The undeveloped land at the extreme southern end of the East Study Area appears to contain mainly ruderal vegetation and does not appear to have been used for agricultural purposes in recent years. Wildlife Habitat. The agricultural activities in the study areas greatly reduce wildlife habitat value, therefore, wildlife habitat value for agricultural areas was characterized as moderate.. A few species of birds and mammals may occasionally utilize these fields for foraging and resting, but existing vegetation- provides minimal cover. The -two riparian corridors in the East Study Area provide high value wildlife habitat. The fields adjacent to the riparian habitat could probably be characterized as moderate to high in value, since habitat complexity increases wildlife diversity. The -university campus, and heavily disturbed ranchette development to the south provide low wildlife habitat value. To the extent vernal pools or other seasonal wetlands exist in the study areas,.they may provide suitable habitat for amphibians and -vernal. pool crustaceans. The value of these habitats would.have to be.determined on -a case by case basis. The study area as a whole contains limited habitat for special status wildlife species known to occur in the Rohnert Park area. The potential occurrence of these species was factored into the low, moderate, or high wildlife habitat ranking given to each area. The classification shown on the maps are defined as follows: [38] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Low wildlife habitat value. Areas that have been developed and are subject to regular human disturbance generally provide low habitat value for native amphibians, reptiles, birds and mammals. Species diversity and abundance is very low. Moderate wildlife habitat value. Agricultural areas generally have moderate habitat value for wildlife because of the, loss of native vegetation and resulting foraging and cover habitat. Roadsides and ditches may provide suitable cover for common reptiles, such as western fence. lizards and gopher snakes. Common birds, such as killdeer and red-tailed hawks, may forage in agricultural fields. Raccoons and striped skunks are among the mammals that are often encountered in agricultural lands. However, due to low habitat complexity, overall wildlife species diversity and abundance is generally low. High wildlife habitat value. Areas that retain native vegetation and habitat complexity generally have high species diversity and abundance. An undisturbed riparian community is an example of a high value habitat. The presence of surface water and dense vegetation attracts many species of wildlife, including those from other habitat types. Wildlife common to both habitats, as well as a number of opportunistic species, tend to colonize such transition areas. Because of this, the variety and density of wildlife often is greatest in such areas. WETLANDS Wetlands can occur in existing and abandoned agricultural -areas and in riparian areas, therefore large portions of the study area have the potential to contain wetlands. An analysis of mapped soil types (USDA 1972), mapped wetlands ([JSFWS 1987)6, aerial photographs (Aero Cartographics 1995), and field assessment was used to rank the potential for wetland occurrence in the area. The classification shown on the maps are defined as follows: Low. wetlands potential. Mounded, sloping, or urbanized areas that showed little capacity for ponding or conveyingmater were characterized as having a low potential to contain wetlands. These characterizations were made entirely from aerial photographs and reconnaissance -level field ground truthing. • Moderate wetlands potential. Areas in flat or rolling agricultural fields that had no immediately obvious signs of wetlands presence were classified as having a moderate potential to contain wetlands. These areas contained mapped soil types that may have hydric soil -inclusions,=but aerial photograph and field analysis did f not reveal any well-defined wetland indicators. 6 U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. 1987. National Wetland Inventory Map, Cotati quadrangle. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Portland, OR. [391 Source Wetlands Research Associates, 1997. ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING High wetlands potential. Riparian areas, ditches with hydrophytic vegetation, mapped wetland areas (USFWS 1987), areas with hydric soils (USDA 1972), and other likely wetland areas seen in the field and on aerial photographs (Aero Cartographics 1995) were characterized as having a high potential to contain wetlands. All riparian areas are located in the East Study Area north of Sonoma State University. VERNAL POOL AND RARE PLANT HABITAT The Santa Rosa Plain Vernal Pool Ecosystem Preservation Plan study (CH2M HILL 1995) developed a set of criteria for assessing vernal pools. These criteria were: biological resources (rare species, habitat quality, level of disturbance), land use (zoning, existing use, adjacent use), and acquisition feasibility (land ownership, conservation easements). The CH2M HILL assessment was conducted using existing information and involved no ground-truthing of this information. For the present study a set of criteria based on biological resources and current land use was used to assess the potential for vernal pool occurrence. Ground-truthing was used to further refine the assessment decisions reached. Mapped soil types found within much of the Westside study area have the potential to contain vernal pools. Most of the soils in this area are mapped as clear Lake clay, 0 to 2 percent slopes (CeA)' A small.portion at the northern edge of the site is mapped as Wright loam, shallow, wet, 0 to 2 percent slopes (WoA) (see map on page _). For the Wright loam, the soil survey characterizes the permeability of the soil as very slow in the subsoil, drainage is somewhat poor, and runoff is very slow. The permeability and runoff for the Clear Lake clay is characterized as slow. Both of these soils have the potential to have vernal pools or other seasonal wetlands present. Either one could be used as an area for establishing a wetland mitigation bank, but on-site analysis to determine the presence and quality -of surface and sub -surface layers should be undertaken prior to selecting a. site.. A review of a local aerial photograph' and the Santa Rosa Plan Vernal Pool Ecosystem Preservation Plan' found that nearby vernal pools occur mainly on four soil types. These soils include the two found in the West Study Area and two related soils: Clear Lake clay, ponded, 0 to 2 percent slopes (CfA) and Wright loam, wet, 0 to 2 percent slopes (WhA). Agricultural activity and urbanization in the Westside area has eliminated most natural habitat and vegetation, including native vernal pool species. Areas that have not been 'U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service. 1972. Soil Survey of Sonoma County, California. In cooperation with the University of California Agricultural Experiment Station. . ' Aero Cartographics. 1995. Aerial photograph of Rohnert Park area flown June 1995. ' CH2M Hill. -.1995. Final Santa Rosa Plain Vernal Pool Ecosystem Preservation Plan. Prepared for Santa Rosa Plain Vernal Pool Task Force. . (41], Source: Wetlands Research Associates, 1997. Wetlands Vernal Pool and Rare Plant Habitat High Potential Moderate Potential ® Moderate Potential 0 Low Potential Wetlands, Vernal Pool and ® Low Potential Rare Plant Habitat ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING farmed, have been abandoned for some time, or have been used for grazing, have the potential to contain vernal pools with vernal pool endemic plant species. Special status plant species known to occur in the vicinity of Rohnert Park are all found in vernal pools. Table 6 summarizes the special status plants that may occur in the Rohnert Park planning area. The potential occurrence of vernal pools and special status plant species habitat was assessed jointly, and the following classifications are shown on the map. Low vernal pool and rare plant habitat potential. Mounded, sloping, farmed, riparian, or urbanized areas were characterized as having a low potential to contain vernal pools. • Moderate vernal pool and rare plant habitat potential. Existing and abandoned agricultural fields or areas used for grazing with flat to rolling topography were classified as having a moderate potential to contain vernal pools. These areas were identified in the field or on aerial photographs of the site. • High vernal pool and rare plant habitat potential. High vernal pool and rare plant habitat potential occurs in areas used for grazing or open space, with known mapped vernal pool soil types, and clear signatures on aerial photographs. No high potential vernal pool habitat was seen anywhere within the Study Area. DEVELOPMENT AND MITIGATION ISSUES The need for future detailed biological surveys of any portion of the study areas has to be determined on a case-by-case basis. In general, special status species surveys and jurisdictional wetlands delineations should be conducted prior to development on any areas rated as moderate or high for these categories. Low potential habitat areas may only require a biological assessment to determine that there is no need for more detailed studies. All riparian areas in the northern portion of the East Study Area should be avoided in future development plans for biological, time, and cost reasons. These areas contain high quality wildlife habitat and potential jurisdictional wetland areas. Development in these areas would require a California Department of Fish and Game 1603 Streambed Alteration Agreement, and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers wetland permit with compensatory mitigation required. Under CEQA, impacted riparian areas are also usually required to be mitigated through creation or enhancement of similar habitat. [43] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Reptiles Northwestern pond turtle Clemmys marmorata marmorata FSC, CSC Birds Tricolored blackbird Agelaius tricolor FSC, CSC Western yellow -billed cuckoo Cocryzus americanus occidentalis SE Key to Status Codes: CSC California Department of Fish and Game FE Table 6 Species of Special Concern FPE SPECIAL STATUS PLANT AND ANIMAL SPECIES THAT MAY OCCUR IN THE ROHNERT PARK STUDY AREA Threatened or Endangered Common Name Species Status Plants Federal Species of Concern or to one extended population Sonoma alopecurus Alopecurus aequalis var sonomensis FPE, CNPS 1B Sonoma sunshine Blennosperma bakeri FE, SE, CNPS 1B Dwarf downingia Downingia pusilla CNPS 2 Fragrant fritillary Fritillaria liliacea FSC, CNPS 1B Burke's goldfields Lasthenia burkei FE, SE, CNPS IB Legenere Legenere limosa FSC, CNPS 1B Sebastopol meadowfoam Limnanthes vincularis FE, SE, CNPS 1B Baker's navarretia Navarretia leucocephala ssp. bakeri CNPS 1B North Coast semaphore grass Pleuropogon hooverianus FSC, CNPS 1B Hickman's cinquefoil Potentilla hickmanii FPE, SE, CNPS IB Showy indian clover Trifolium amoenum FPE, CNPS IB Invertebrates California freshwater shrimp Syncaris pacifica FE, SE Amphibians California tiger salamander Ambystoma californiense FC, CSC Reptiles Northwestern pond turtle Clemmys marmorata marmorata FSC, CSC Birds Tricolored blackbird Agelaius tricolor FSC, CSC Western yellow -billed cuckoo Cocryzus americanus occidentalis SE Key to Status Codes: CSC California Department of Fish and Game FE Federal Endangered Species of Special Concern FPE Proposed for Federal Endangered Listing CNPS 1B California Native Plant Society Rare, Threatened or Endangered FC Candidate for Federal Listing CNPS2 Occurrence confined to several populations FSC Federal Species of Concern or to one extended population SE State Endangered Source: California Department of Fish and Game. 1997. Natural Diversity Data Base records for the Cotati, Santa Rosa, Sebastopol, and Two Rock USGS quadrangles. [44] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING It is likely that the main type of biological impacts that will occur within the study area are wetland impacts. If the impacts are significant they would need to be mitigated as they occur following U.S. Army Corps of Engineers guidelines. Any vernal pools that are located in potential development areas should be avoided if possible. Impacts to vernal pools or other wetlands could be mitigated through in-kind wetland creation, or by purchasing credits in a local wetland mitigation bank if available and appropriate. Efforts to minimize wetland, vernal pool, and riparian impacts should be undertaken through careful planning and zoning policies. CULTURAL RESOURCES Prior to inhabitation by Europeans, Coast Miwok and Southern Pomo Indians inhabited the Rohnert Park area. These two groups occupied areas along watercourses and at the base of the foothills, potential locations for archaeological sites. Review of records and literature on file at the Northwest Information Center (NWIC) at Sonoma State University indicates that the Eastside study area contains two recorded Native American (CA -SON -1061 and CASON-1923) and two recorded historic archaeological sites (C-728 and CA -SON -1913H). There is a third archaeological site within this area (CA -SON -1574), however it consists of materials that have been redeposited as a result of analysis conducted at Sonoma State University. There are no recorded cultural resources located within the Westside study area. State and federal inventories indicate that there may be historic properties located on Wilfred Avenue. These properties have been determined ineligible for the National Register of Historic Places; however, they may have historic significance on a local level. NWIC records indicate that approximately 30 percent of the Eastside study area and 25 percent of the Westside study area has been examined for cultural resources. . NATIVE AMERICAN CULTURAL RESOURCES The possibility of identifying unrecorded Native American cultural resources was based on ethnographic information, environmental setting, and the locations of recorded archaeological sites. The results of this research were different for each area. Both study areas .are located within the linguistic territory known as Coast Miwok which is a version of the Penutian language. Native American cultural resources in this portion of Sonoma County tend to be situated on alluvial plains and at the base of hills, as well as near former and existing sources of water. Eastside: The eastern area encompasses broad alluvial flats near Crane Creek, Copeland Creek, and Hinebaugh Creek. In addition, this area is next to an area that was once part of a marsh. As noted above, two archeological sites have been recorded. Both of these sites contain scattered chert and obsidian stone tool manufacturing debris, and stone tools. Consequently, there is a possibility of identifying unrecorded cultural resources in this area. [45] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Westside: The western study area encompasses a broad alluvial flat that lies within the boundaries of an historic marsh. No archaeological sites have been identified in this area. Consequently, there is a low possibility of identifying unrecorded cultural resources in this project area. HISTORIC CULTURAL RESOURCES Review of historic literature and maps indicated that there are two recorded historic . cultural resources located within the Westside area. Resource C-728 is a tankhouse and windmill stand that may have belonged to Robert Crane. Resource CASON-1913H is the archaeological remains of a house that was shown on the 1877 Thompson Atlas. In addition, several historic period buildings and structures located within both project areas are depicted on historic maps. Some of them are still standing, while only archaeological remains may be left of others. Consequently, the possibility exists of identifying historic cultural resources in this area. SUMMARY OF ENVIRONMENTAL CONSTRAINTS The map on the following page summarizes the environmental constraints that should be considered in planning for development on the City's Westside or Eastside. These constraints include flood hazards, high liquefaction potential, prime farmland, and farmland of state importance. [46] ®Areas that are considered archeologically sensitive for Native American and/or historic remains Source: California Historical Resources Information System Archeological Resources Open Channel Pipe System (W' and larger) ® 100 -year Flood Zone ® 500 -year Flood Zone Prime Farmland Farmland of Statewide Importance ® High Liquefaction Environmental :Resources -and Constraints ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING S.LAND USE AND VISUAL CHARACTER Rohnert Park's land use pattern has emerged over the years, following generally the guide established in the original master plan for the City. Founded in 1956, Rohnert Park was incorporated in 1962 and has evolved from a primarily residential community to a city with a full range of community facilities and services, including parks and recreation facilities, a sports center, performing arts center, Sonoma State University, and major employers, such as Hewlett-Packard, State Farm Insurance and others. Much of the development within the current city limits was undertaken in the 1970s and 1980s; the diagram on the following page shows the sequence of development by neighborhood., Highway 101 bisects the City, separating the residential neighborhoods on the Eastside from the commercial and industrial areas on the West Side. Connections between east and west sides of the City are provided by the Rohnert Park Expressway and Golf Course Drive, which connects to Redwood Drive. The total area of the city itself is approximately 4,400 acres, nearly half of which is devoted to residential uses. About a quarter of the remaining developed land is in industrial, commercial, and office use, with the balance in public and institutional uses or right-of-way. Most of the neighborhoods in the City, except for the two oldest (Neighborhood A and Neighborhood B), were built in the 1970s and later. Today, little land remains in the City that has not already been committed for development, either with an approved plan or subdivision or other form of entitlement. The map following the diagrams of the sequence of development shows the remaining, vacant land, and the land potentially, available for development in the Eastside and Westside study areas. Following this is a map of current development activity. Rohnert Park's neighborhoods were the City's building blocks, so it makes sense to look closely at them to see the residential character that has evolved and the potential relationship to new residential or commercial development that may occur beyond the existing City limits. How well would existing neighborhoods connect to new neighborhoods? Is the neighborhood character that has evolved most appropriate for new neighborhoods at the edge of the existing City? The visual character of the edges of the City also is important to consider in relation to potential urban expansion beyond the current boundaries. Key visual attributes are discussed and illustrated following the neighborhood form analysis and the analysis of Westside commercial and industrial development. [49) 1970-80 SEPTEMBER 1997 CITY OF RoHNERT PARK Current Development Historical Development History of Development Vacant Land (Generally over two acres) Source: City of Rohnert Park General Plan, 1995: Interpretation of aerial photograph taken June 1995. Vacant Land Current Development Site Source: City of Rohnert Park Current Development Activity, 1997 �c h'YiC S. ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING NEIGHBORHOOD FORM The neighborhood form analysis is intended to identify key attributes of different phases of Rohnert Park's history. For comparative evaluation, the analysis shown on the followingdiagrams, was done with 100 -acre sized units drawn to the same scale. This makes it easy to make visual comparisons as' well as perceive the differences between these neighborhoods. Factors that are analyzed include: • Number of intersections: The number of intersections measure "explorability" in a neighborhood and the ability of residents to reach destinations within the neighborhood with brief walks or bike rides. Typical subdivisions in California cities in the 1950s and 1960s have about 10 intersections in a 100 -acre analysis unit. • Through -streets: Through -streets are of special significance as an indicator of potential connectivity between different neighborhoods. Although there are few through -streets in the study neighborhoods, it is possible to get through most neighborhoods with some turns and jogs. Only in Neighborhood G do we find no through -streets because neither of the access streets connects to Petaluma Hill Road. • Number of blocks: Blocks, defined as areas completely surrounded by streets, are a measure of "permeability" of a.neighborhood — its ability to facilitate movement of pedestrians, bicycles and vehicles. The greater the number of blocks, the easier it is to move around a neighborhood. In older residential neighborhoods built with grid or modified grid systems, there are typically 15 to 20 blocks in'a 100 - acre analysis area. • Access points: Neighborhood accessibility is measured by the number of access points, which shows how well the neighborhood is connected with surrounding areas. The greater the number of access points the less introverted the neighborhood is. In residential areas that are well-connected to each other, the number of access points range from 10 to 15 in a 100 -acre analysis unit. Where' cul-de-sacs predominate, it is a clear indication that the neighborhood was consciously designed to reduce accessibility. With this in mind, it is no surprise that one of the newest neighborhoods (Neighborhood G) has the fewest number of access points. A brief description of each of the selected neighborhoods follows. Number of Intersections (T -intersections counted as 0.5) 11 9.5 14 14 5 Number of Through Streets 7 3 3 0 6 Number of Blocks 4 3 3 1 2 Number of Access Points 9 4 5 2 8 ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Neighborhood A Neighborhood A, one of the original Rohnert Park neighborhoods, is located north of Southwest Boulevard and east of Commerce Boulevard. Long internal blocks and few connections to the surrounding grid system characterize this neighborhood. There is minimal use of cul-de-sacs, and local streets connect subareas within the neighborhood, so it is relatively easy to bike or walk.not only to adjacent schools and parks but -also to visit other neighbors. Two schools are located on either side of the neighborhood: John Reed Elementary School and Mountain Shadows Middle.School. This neighborhood has an attractive character typical of many older neighborhoods, with mature trees and well - landscaped front yards. Notably, the recreational facilities are located at the edge of the neighborhood along a residential arterial, and are not in the center of the neighborhood. Neighborhood E Following the initial subdivision of Neighborhood A in the 1950s and early `60s, the neighborhood site planning that evolved in Rohnert Park shows more inward orientation, greater use of cul-de-sacs and separation of building types. The higher -density rental housing, for example, along Petaluma Hill Road is isolated from the balance of the neighborhood to the west, and there are no vehicular connections between these two residential areas. Pedestrian bridges provide access across drainage channels. These neighborhoods have fewer access points, fewer intersections and fewer continuous blocks, which means it is not as easy to walk around the neighborhood and develop the informal contacts that well-connected neighborhood streets often offer. This neighborhood also has fewer access points than Neighborhood A (3 vs. 4) and it is not well-connected to adjacent neighborhoods by through -streets. In fact, there are only three through -streets serving this analysis unit compared with seven through -streets in the Neighborhood A analysis unit. Neighborhood R Located along east Cotati Avenue adjacent to Sonoma State University, Neighborhood R was designed and laid out in the early 1980s. The arrangement of streets reflects the same site planning concepts as in Neighborhood E, with cul-de-sacs and centrally -located open space. The higher -density housing adjacent to the University is isolated from the rest of the development. Through -streets are on the edge of the neighborhood or, in the case of the neighborhood south of Cotati Avenue, Snyder Lane offers a connection between this neighborhood and other residential neighborhoods to the north and east. Only the arterial streets provide connectivity; no residential street within this neighborhood unit connects with adjacent residential streets and adjacent neighborhoods, except for Snyder Lane. To its credit, this inward looking site plan does provide a buffer between the neighborhood and Sonoma State University to the east as well as buffering from noise from Cotati Avenue. [54] VISUAL CHARACTER: ROHNERT PARK NEIGHBORHOODS Neighborhood A has mature trees, .well -landscaped yards, and long internal streets. Neighborhood R reflects an inward orientation with greater use of cul-de-sacs. Neighborhood G is isolated, with few connections to adjacent neighborhoods and surrounding rural areas. High density housing along Snyder Lane in Neighborhood E is isolated from other neighborhoods. Centrally -located open space in Neighborhood R is a community focal point. Canon Manor typifies rural development under county standards. ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Neighborhood G Located in the northeast corner of the City, with access provided by Golf Course Drive and Holly Avenue, Neighborhood G is one of Rohnert Park's newer neighborhoods. It includes a central recreation area in Golis Park and the Goldridge Elementary School. As in the other newer neighborhoods, use of cul-de-sac streets limits connections with adjacent neighborhoods. In fact, there are no through -streets in this analysis unit, so it is quite isolated from other residential areas. Canon Manor Canon Manor is a County subdivision originally laid out in the 1950s. It typifies rural residential development with very large blocks and large lots. The grid structure, though, does provide some opportunities for informal interaction among residents who may walk or bike around the area. Canon Manor is well-connected to the City's street system, and easy access is provided to other parts of the community and the County. FORM OF COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT Large, big box retailing stores (K -Mart, Home Depot and Wal-Mart) characterizes the commercial development along Redwood Drive. Further south are fast food restaurants, the Press Democrat building and Scandia. The Rohnert Park Business Park originally subdivided in the 1980s, is substantially built out. Except for some vacant parcels along Business Park Drive and Park Court, it contains large buildings in a landscape setting with parking lot berms. To the southwest of the business park is the Rancho Verde mobile home park, with access from Rohnert Park Expressway. The main access to the business park is from Redwood Drive and the Rohnert Park Expressway. In sum, the commercial, industrial and residential areas west of Highway 101 reflect a conscious policy to create exclusive uses areas and separate potentially incompatible uses. The physical development pattern also reflects the automobile orientation of the site plans, with minimal access points and few through -streets. The retail buildings along .. p Redwood Drive are oriented to the parking lots in front and the visibility that Highway 101 provides. The site planning in this area also does not encourage pedestrian activity; the blocks are large, access points few in number, and only in the business park -area is there any potential for walking along shaded sidewalks. However, there are no destinations that are readily accessible to either those working in the area or living in the Rancho Verde mobile, home park south of the.business park. [57] VISUAL CHARACTER: FORM OF COMMERCIAL AND INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT Industrial development in the Rohnert Park Business Park with landscaped berms in front of parking. Shaded sidewalks, bus stop and a bike route in the Rohnert Park Business Park. Retail and restaurants along Redwood Drive. The area is auto related with parking in front of buildings and siting for freeway visibility. Form of Commercial and Industrial Development Land Use Intermediate Density Residential Commercial Industrial Other Public -Intersections Through Streets Westside 1970-90 Westside 1990+ Number of Intersections.(Tintersections counted as 0.5) 5.5 Number of Through Streets I Number of Blocks . I Number of Access Pointy 3 1.5 I 0 4 ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING VISUAL ANALYSIS OF COMMUNITY CHARACTER The photographs on the pages following show views of the Eastside and Westside study areas. The intent is to illustrate the community character of these areas and the current "edge conditions" around the City. The visual characteristics of existing uses and the landscape in these areas are summarized in the following sections. Eastside On the Eastside of Petaluma Hill Road, east of the developed residential areas in Rohnert Park, large landholdings are used for agriculture and grazing. Some crop sales stands can be seen along Petaluma Hill Road near the intersection with .Cotati Avenue. South of Cotati Avenue, the Canon Manor subdivision has been partially developed for rural residential areas on 1 — 2 acre lots. The northern portion of the study area, north of Sonoma State University, includes substantial open land. As noted in Chapter 3, this area has been designated as a potential irrigation area in the Santa Rosa Sub -Regional Long -Range Wastewater Project. The impetus for this proposal stems from the need to dispose of treated wastewater. One of the options being considered by the City of Santa Rosa is to build a reservoir dam in the eastern foothills and then use reclaimed water, stored at that dam site, for irrigation purposes. The irrigation area shown for the South County Reclamation Alternative does include land on both the east and west sides of Petaluma Hill Road. West of Petaluma Hill Road, much of the open land is in open pasture. Little land has been intensively cultivated in recent years, which provides attractive open .vistas from Petaluma Hill Road looking past to the developed eastern edge of Rohnert Park. The scale of these views is dramatic, as the foreground is quite extensive, and trees, along the natural drainages and the eastern edge of the built City, frame many of these vistas. Some major institutional uses, including the medical center just north of the University and the new Creekside Middle School can be seen from Petaluma Hill Road, while south of the University, the.City edge views include the Hewlett Packard facilities and the new subdivisions west of Snyder -Lane. Canon Manor, south of the University, is an rural subdivision that relies on septic systems. The open rural residential nature of this development, coupled with the grid access pattern, represents.a major change in visual character, when compared with Rohnert Park neighborhoods. Canon.Manor also provides a distinct contrast to the well - landscaped environment provided by the University, particularly with the tall stands of the eucalyptus trees along Cotati Avenue and the landscaped berm along Petaluma Hill Road that screens the sports facility. [60] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING The visual setting on the Eastside would change significantly if residential development occurred along the Westside of Petaluma Hill Road. However, sensitive site planning, buffering and preservation of major tree stands could do much to alleviate any adverse impacts. Setbacks along Petaluma Hill Road and periodic stands of wind -break trees breakout some of the vistas; while large fields do offer views of distant hills. -Westside On the westside of Rohnert Park, the visual character of adjacent agricultural lands is quite different because they are intensively irrigated and cultivated. A dairy operation north of Rohnert Park Expressway is on Prime Farmland, as classified by the State of California. The Laguna de Santa Rosa marks the western edge of the potential expansion area. This. drainage includes much riparian vegetation and defines the edge of irrigated crop land that lies east of the Laguna de Santa Rosa. To the immediate west of the commercial buildings in the Wal-Mart Center along Redwood Drive, lie older, scattered rural residential uses. North -south access.roads.are not improved to urban standards, and the two-lane access roads extending west to Stony Point Road are not much better. These rural residential areas do have visible stands of trees which are landmarks. The southern portion of the Westside study area abuts the Rohnert Park Industrial Park, which is substantially developed, although there are some unbuilt lots on the edge of the park west of the main access road, Business Park Drive. The developed, suburban character of the park, with landscape setbacks and regularly spaced trees, is in marked contrast to the adjacent rural residential areas. Finally, along the Rohnert Park Expressway is the Rancho Verde mobile home park with access provided only from the Expressway. The western edge of this park is delineated by tall stands of trees, an open channel -and a solid wall, so there is no potential visual connection between this urban use and any adjacent use. In fact, along the urban edge of the Westside, there are walls both=north and south. Only adjacent to the business park is the edge open with views of fields beyond. Completion of industrial development on the remaining subdivided lots will allow for a "hard" urban edge to be created. The other opportunity for a new "hard" edge.would occur with development to the west of Wilfred Avenue. Opportunities for development also exist just to the north of the Home Express buildings, alongside the Highway 10I .frontage. [61] VISUAL CHARACTER: EASTSIDE STUDY AREA Keiser Road -looking east from Petaluma Hill Road Petaluma Hill Road: looking east at the Medical Center. Driving Range at southwest corner of Cotati Avenue and Petaluma Hill Road. Open land south of Keiser Road, with Sonoma State Universityin the distance. Valley House Drive: looking east from Petaluma Hill Road View east along Cotati Avenue, with the University to the north and Canon.Manor to the South. ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING The visual issue at the northern entry to the City, along Redwood Drive is whether a single frontage road can be a logical urban'edge, or is development needed on the small infill parcels to enhance the entry. The "urban" landscaping along both sides of Redwood Drive, from the edge of the Home Express site, suggests that development to the north is anticipated in that there has been no attempt to establish an urban -rural Edge. The visual edge now is a landscaped berm with open field beyond it. Tall buildings along the Highway 101 frontage would adversely affect views from the north (travelers driving south on Highway 101); however, the arterial road provides access to -this commercial pocket of development. Low -scale development would not have adverse visual effects if substantial landscaping were provided around buildings and parking areas. On the other hand, the landscape character along this commercial frontage road does clearly mark the northern end.of urban development. Because no transition occurs between commercial development and adjacent residential development, the edge is visually apparent and could be sustained. Landscaping, setback and design standards would be needed to ensure views of the existing retail areas are maintained when seen by visitors to the City arriving on Highway 101 from the north. I VISUAL CHARACTER: DEVELOPMENT ADJACENT TO WESTSIDE STUDY AREA Northern edge of commercial development, looking west. - Retail business on the west side of Redwood Drive. Rohnert.Park Expressway: looking east. New Lavath Avenue' development is on the south side. Rural residential uses just westof commercial development along Redwood Drive. Rohnert Park Expressway: looking east at southern edge of Westside study area and new commercial development in the distance. VISUAL CHARACTER: WESTSIDE AGRICULTURAL AREAS View north from Rohnert Park Expressway, with Rancho Verde Mobile Home Park on the east side. Active dairy operations at Stony Point Road and Rohnert Park Expressway. _ ya View from Rohnert Park Expressway north along north branch of Laguna de Santa Rosa. View from Stony Point Road east to Rancho Verde Mobile Home Park, across designated community separator. View of Rohnert Park Business Park from Wilfred Avenue, looking across agricultural lands. View east from rural residential area to commercial development along Redwood Drive. ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING 6. NOISE This chapter presents information on the noise environment, compiled by Illingworth & Rodkin, consultants to the City on acoustics. The analysis includes background data and information and a discussion of the implications of the General Plan Update BACKGROUND The City's existing Noise Element states, "The purpose of the noise element is to identify existing noise problems in the community and to provide guidance to planners and developers for avoiding problems in the future." The State of California recognizes the relationship between noise and noise sensitive land uses and emphasizes the need to control noise at the local level through land use regulation. Section 65302(f) of the California Government Code requires that each city have a Noise Element as a part of the General Plan. NOISE CHARACTERISTICS Noise may be defined as unwanted sound. Noise is usually objectionable because it is disturbing or annoying. The objectionable nature of sound could be caused by its pitch or its loudness. Pitch is the height or depth of a tone or sound, depending on the relative rapidity (frequency) of the vibrations by which it is produced. Higher pitched signals sound louder to humans than sounds with a lower pitch. Loudness is intensity of sound waves combined with the reception characteristics of the ear. Intensity may be compared with the height of an ocean wave in that it is a measure of the amplitude of the sound wave. In addition to the concepts of pitch and loudness, there are several noise measurement scales which are used to describe noise in a particular location. A decibel (dB) is a unit of measurement which indicates the relative amplitude of a sound. The zero on the decibel scale is based on the lowest sound level that the healthy, unimpaired human ear can detect. Sound levels in decibels are calculated on a logarithmic basis. An increase of 10 decibels represents a ten -fold increase in acoustic energy, while 20 decibels is 100 times. more intense, 30 decibels is 1,000 times more intense, etc. There.is a relationship between the subjective noisiness or loudness of a sound`and its intensity.. Each 10 decibel increase in.sound level is perceived as approximately a doubling of loudness over a fairly wide range of intensities. Technical terms are defined in Table 7. There are several methods of characterizing sound. The most corrimon in California is the A -weighted sound level or dBA. This scale gives greater weight to the frequencies of sound to which .the human ear is most sensitive. Representative outdoor and indoor noise levels in units of dBA are shown in Table 8. Because sound levels can vary markedly over a short period of time, a method for describing either the average character of the sound or the -statistical behavior of the variations must be utilized. Most commonly, environmental sounds are described in terms of an average level that has the same ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING acoustical energy as the summation of all the time -varying events. This energy -equivalent sound/noise descriptor is called L_'. The most common averaging period is hourly, but Lrq can describe any series of noise events of arbitrary duration. The scientific instrument used to measure noise is the sound level meter. Sound level meters can accurately measure environmental noise levels to within about plus or minus 1 dBA.._ Various computer models are used to predict environmental noise levels from sources, such as roadways and airports. The accuracy of the predicted. models depends upon the distance the receptor is from the noise source. -Close to the noise source, the models are accurate to within about plus or minus 1 to 2 dBA. Since the sensitivity to noise increases during the evening and at night -- because excessive noise interferes with the ability to sleep -- 247hour descriptors have been developed that incorporate artificial noise penalties added to quiet -time noise events. The Community Noise Equivalent Level, CNEL, is a measure of the cumulative noise exposure in a community, with a 5 dB penalty added to evening (7:00 pm - i0:00 pm) and a 10 dB addition to nocturnal (10:00 pm - 7:00 am) noise levels. The Day/Night Average Sound Level, Lda' is essentially the same as CNEL, with the exception that the evening time period is dropped and all occurrences during this three-hour period are grouped into the daytime period. While physical damage to the ear from an intense noise impulse is rare, a degradation of auditory acuity can occur even within a community noise environment. Hearing loss occurs mainly due to chronic.exposure to excessive noise, but may be due to.a single event such as an explosion. Natural hearing loss associated with aging may also be accelerated from chronic exposure to loud noise. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has a noise exposure standard which is set at the noise threshold where hearing loss may occur from long-term exposures. The maximum allowable level is 90 dBA averaged over eight hours. If the noise is above 90 dBA, the allowable exposure time is correspondingly shorter. The thresholds for speech interference indoors are about 45 dBA if the noise is steady and above 55 dBA if the noise is fluctuating. Outdoors the thresholds are about .i5 dBA higher. Steady noise of sufficient intensity (above 35 dBA) and fluctuating noise :Levels above about 45 dBA have been shown:to affect sleep. Interior residential standards for multi -family dwellings are set by the State of California at 45 dBA L.. Typically, the highest steady traffic noise level during the daytime is about equal to the Ldn and nighttime levels are 10 dBA lower. The standard is designed for sleep and. speech protection and most jurisdictions apply the same criterion for all residential uses.• Typical structural attenuation is 12-17 dBA with open windows. With closed windows in good condition, the noise attenuation factor is around -20 dBA for an older structure and 25 dBA for a newer dwelling. -Sleep and speech interference is therefore possible when exterior noise levels are about 57-62 dBA Ldn with open windows and 65=70 dBA Ldn if the windows are closed. ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Equivalent Noise Level, The average A -weighted noise level during the measurement period. Community Noise The average A -weighted noise level during a 24-hour day, obtained Equivalent Level, CNEL after addition of 5 decibels in the evening from 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm and after addition of 10 decibels to sound levels measured in the night between 10:00 pm and 7:00 am. Day/Night Noise Level, The average A -weighted noise level during a 24-hour day, obtained. Ldp after addition of 10.decibels to levels measured in the night between 10:00 pm and 7:00 am. Lm,,, Lmin The maximum and minimum A -weighted noise level during the measurement period. Ambient Noise Level The composite of noise from all sources near and far. The normal or existing level of environmental noise at a given location. Intrusive That.noise which intrudes over and above the existing ambient noise at a.given location. The relative intrusiveness of a sound depends upon its amplitude, duration, frequency, and time of occurrence and tonal or informational content as well as the prevailing ambient noise level. Source: Illingworth & Rodkin, Inc./Acoustical Engineers [68] Table 7 DEFINITIONS OF ACOUSTICAL TERMS TERM DEFINITIONS Decibel, dB A unit describing the amplitude of sound, equal to 20 times the logarithm to the base 10 of the ratio of the pressure of the sound measured to the reference pressure, which is.20 micropascals (20 micronewtons per square meter). Frequency, Hz The number of complete pressure fluctuations per second above and. below atmospheric pressure. A -Weighted Sound The -sound pressure level in decibels as measured on a sound level Level, dBA meter using the A -weighting filter network. The A -weighting filter de- emphasizes the very low and very high frequency components of the sound.in a manner similar to the frequency response of the human ear and correlates well with, subjective reactions to noise. All sound levels in this report are A -weighted, unless reported otherwise. Lo,, L,p, L50, L90 The A -weighted noise levels.thatare exceeded 1%, 10%, 50%, and 90% of the time during the measurement period. Equivalent Noise Level, The average A -weighted noise level during the measurement period. Community Noise The average A -weighted noise level during a 24-hour day, obtained Equivalent Level, CNEL after addition of 5 decibels in the evening from 7:00 pm to 10:00 pm and after addition of 10 decibels to sound levels measured in the night between 10:00 pm and 7:00 am. Day/Night Noise Level, The average A -weighted noise level during a 24-hour day, obtained. Ldp after addition of 10.decibels to levels measured in the night between 10:00 pm and 7:00 am. Lm,,, Lmin The maximum and minimum A -weighted noise level during the measurement period. Ambient Noise Level The composite of noise from all sources near and far. The normal or existing level of environmental noise at a given location. Intrusive That.noise which intrudes over and above the existing ambient noise at a.given location. The relative intrusiveness of a sound depends upon its amplitude, duration, frequency, and time of occurrence and tonal or informational content as well as the prevailing ambient noise level. Source: Illingworth & Rodkin, Inc./Acoustical Engineers [68] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Table 8 TYPICAL SOUND LEVELS MEASURED IN THE ENVIRONMENT AND INDUSTRY A -Weighted At a Given Distance Sound Level From Noise Source in Decibels Noise Environments Subjective Impression '140 Civil Defense Siren (100') 130 Jet Takeoff (200') 120 Pain Threshold 110 Rock Music Concert Diesel Pile Driver (100') 100 Very Loud 90 Boiler Room Freight Cars (50') Printing Press Plant Pneumatic Drill (50') 80 Freeway (100') In Kitchen With Garbage Vacuum Cleaner (10') 70 Disposal Running Moderately Loud 60 Data Processing Center Light Traffic (100') 50 Department Store Large Transformer (200') 40 Private Business Office Quiet Soft Whisper (5') '30 Quiet Bedroom 20' Recording Studio 10 Threshold of Hearing .0 Source: Illingworth Rodkin, Inc./Acoustical Engineers [691 ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Levels of 55-60 dBA are common along collector streets and secondary arterials, while 65- 70 dBA is a typical value for a primary/major arterial. Levels of 75-80 dBA are normal noise levels at the first row of development outside a freeway right-of-way. In order to achieve an acceptable interior noise environment, bedrooms facing secondary roadways need to be able to have their windows -closed, those facing major roadways and freeways typically need special glass -.windows. Attitude surveys are used for measuring the annoyance felt in a community for. noises intruding into homes or affecting outdoor activity areas. In these surveys, it was determined that the causes for annoyance include interference with speech, radio and television, house vibrations, and interference with sleep and rest. The Ldn as.a measure of noise has been found to provide a valid correlation of noise level and the percentage of people annoyed. People have been asked to judge the annoyance caused by aircraft noise and ground transportation noise. There continues to be disagreement about the relative annoyance of these different sources. When measuring the percentage of the population highly annoyed, the threshold for ground vehicle noise is about 55 dBA Ldn. At an Ldn of about 60 dBA, approximately 2 percent of the population is highly annoyed. When the L. increases to 70 dBA, the percentage of the population highly annoyed increases to about 12 percent of the population. There is, therefore, an increase of about 1 percent per dBA between an Ldn of 60-70 dBA. Between an Ldn of 70-80 dBA, each decibel increase increases by about 2 percent the percentage of the population highly annoyed. People appear to respond more adversely to aircraft noise. When the Ldn is 60 dBA, . approximately 10 percent of the population is believed to be highly annoyed. Each decibel increase to 70 dBA adds about 2 percentage points to the number of people highly annoyed. Above 70 dBA, each decibel increase results in about a 3 percent increase in the percentage of the population highly annoyed. NOISE SOURCES IN ROHNERT PARK . The major source of noise in Rohnert Park is vehicular traffic, including automobiles, trucks, buses, and motorcycles. U.S. Highway 101, Rohnert Park Expressway, Snyder Lane, Southwest Boulevard, East Cotati Avenue, and Golf.Course Drive have been identified as the major sources of roadway .traffic noise. The study area for the General Plan Update includes areas along Petaluma`Hill Road on the east and new development areas in the northwest along Millbrae Avenue and Wilfred Avenue. Noise measurements were conducted in 1997 as a part -of the Noise Element Update to provide additional information in these areas; see map of locations on the following.page. The results of the noise measurements are shown in Figure l . Highway 101 noise adjacent to Commerce Boulevard near Avram Avenue has a measured Ldn of 75 dBA. Comparison with measurements conducted in 1989 indicate noise levels have increased about 4 dBA along Highway 101. The increase in noise is attributable to: 1) an increase in traffic and 2) an increase in the speed limit from 55 mph to 65 mph. (70] - CITY of ROHNERT PARK CITY LIMITS _– /.— — — — ... REP.// UpY Pim, i�� "- ZiQL1S k, ---� PAARK .. -wu. Da:::_ .. .,ir ijI // Wilfred Ave o`� II - =— —� j /7 �. z %i,/ I -I •Q I z _ = Keiser Road _ 1 i" •�' _ia-�mvnax--moi I �� =c J —" � � ..,. � � II "- CITY LIMITS , 1'.\-..\ Amp 1 .y.� ilk igh_way forIAI w _ '1 \"h •, Keiser Road 1i�® � � y ; � _ i � I 4 I Avf t _'.Lg�-.STUDY 1 AREA 1. 1- loco HEf 1 � � I •\ J j - ��� IN t5i ��, II 7�i is ;•' ,� U Source: lllingworth & Rodkin, Inc., -1997 ' Noise Monitoring Site Noise Monitoring Locations: • ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Along Petaluma Hill Road at Curtis Drive, between East Cotati Avenue and Valley House Drive, the measured L,,, was 69 dBA. The data show a distribution typical of a rural - suburban highway with daytime noise levels about 10 dBA above nighttime noise levels. Noise measurements were also conducted adjacent to Wilfred Avenue in northwest Rohnert Park and Keiser Road in eastern Rohnert Park. The data along Wilfred Avenue were gathered close to the roadway because this was the only point where a noise monitor could be placed. The Ld„ 20 feet from the roadway was 66 dBA. When adjusted to a distance of 100 feet, assuming the soft ground which is present along the roadway, the Ldn would be normalized to a level of 56 dBA. Noise levels along Wilfred Avenue and Keiser Road are, therefore, similar as expected based on the similarities between the roadways. Existing (1997) traffic noise levels in Rohnert Park were calculated using the Federal Highway Administration's noise prediction model (FHWA-RD-77-108) and California Vehicle Noise Emission Levels developed by Caltrans. The noise measurements were used to determine the relationship between the noise level predicted during the PM peak hour traffic hour and the 24-hour average Ldn. The results of the existing traffic noise analysis is shown in Table 9. The data shows the distances to the Ldn noise contours. The contours are in 5 dBA increments, down to a level of 60 dBA. Roadways which have been included in the table are those which would generate a 60 dBA Ldn noise contour beyond a distance of 50 feet from the roadway centerline. The Northwestern Pacific Railroad currently operates about one train per day and one train every other night through Rohnert Park. The railroad operations have not changed since .1989. The rail operations result in an Ldn of 69 dBA 100 feet from the tracks. The Ldn is 60 dBA at a distance of about 300 feet. Applicable General Plan Policies The Noise Element of. the General Plan currently contains objectives, principles, policies, standards, and implementation measures to control noise in Rohnert Park. The standards are established to evaluate the compatibility of new land uses with the noise environment in developing areas and to assess the impact of new projects on existing noise sensitive land uses. An Ln of 60 dBA is established as the outdoor noise exposure level that is considered normally acceptable with residential development. New residential development along the roadway and the railroad may be exposed to noise levels exceeding an Ldn of 60 dBA. Noise levels along these roadways therefore pose a constraint to development, requiring mitigation measures. Similarly, noise levels along rural roadways in the developing areas of east and northwest Santa Rosa may also -pose a constraint to residential development, although to a lesser degree. Policies set forth in the Noise Element of the General Plan are -expected to mitigate impacts resulting from the buildout of the General Plan to a less than significant level. The Noise Element itself is a mitigating element of the Plan. [72] Lzq ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Rohnert Pk. Expw. [73] Table 9 EXISTING (1997) TRAFFIC NOISE LEVELS IN ROHNERT PARK Distance from Roadway Center Line to Noise Contour Reference Estimated Existing Noise Level Noise Level Distance Traffic : Speed 70 Ldn 65 Ldn 60 Ldn Road Segments (Ldn) Ldn (feet) (Peak -Hr) (mph) (feet) (feet) (feet) US 101 No Sound Wall 75 75 170 7,000 65 370 790 1,700 Behind SoundWall 70 70 170 7,000 65 170 370 790 or Structures (estimate) North-South Roadways Petaluma Hill Rd n/o 68 68 90 1,500 50 70 140 310 Keiser Rd. Petaluma Hill Rd s/o 69 69 90 2,000 50 80 170 360 Keiser Rd. Snyder Lane 60 60 100 1,100 35 <50 50 100 Country Club Dr. 57 57 100 1,000 .25 <50 <50 60 State Farm Dr. 59 59 100 -900 35 <50 <50 90 Commerce Dr. n/o 58 58 100 1,000 30 <50 <50 70 Rohnert Pk Expw Commerce Dr. s/o 59 59 100 1,300 30 <50 <50 '90 . Rohnert Pk Expw Redwood Dr s/o 61 61 100 .1,600 ` .35 <50 50 120 Commerce Dr. Redwood Dr s/o 60 60 100 1,000 35 <50 50 100 Wilfred Av. Redwood Dr s/o 59 59 100 900 _ 35 <50 <50 90 Rohnert Pk. Expw. Stony Point Rd. s/o 61 61 100 1,300 35 <50 :50 ". A-20 Millbrae Av. Stony Point Rd. s/o 60 60 100 1,100 35 <50 50 100 Rohnert Pk. Expw. [73] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Table 9 EXISTING (1997) TRAFFIC NOISE LEVELS IN ROHNERT PARK Source: Illingworth & Rodkin, Inc./Acoustical Engineers Distance from Roadway Center Line to Noise Contour Reference Estimated Existing Noise Level Noise Level Distance Traffic Speed 70 Ldn 65 Ldn 60 Ldn Road Segments (Ldn) Ldn (feet) (Peak -Hr) (mph) (feet) (feet) (feet) East-West Roadways Golf Course Dr. e/o 61 61 100 1,500 35 <50 50 120 Commerce Dr. Golf Course Dr. e/o 60 60 100 1,200 35 <50 50 100 Fairway Dr. Golf Course Dr. e/o 58 58 100 900 35 <50 <50 70 Countnr Club Dr. Rohnert Park Expy. 59 59 100 900 35 <50 <50 90 e/o. Stony Point Rd. Rohnert Park Expy. 62 62 100 1,700 35 <"50 60 .140 e/o Labath Av. Rohnert Park Expy. 63 63 100 2,500 35 <50 70 160 at US 101 Rohnert Park Expy. 62 62 100 2,200 35 . <50 60 140 e/o Commerce Dr. Rohnert Park Expy. 60 60 100 1,300 35 <50 50 100 e/o Country Club Dr. Rohnert Park Expy. 58 58 100 700 35 <50 <50 -70 e/o Snyder Ln. Enterprise Dr. 58 58 100 700 30 <50 <50 70' Southwest Blvd. 60 60 100 1,000 35 <50 50 100 East Cotati Av. 60 60 100 1,100 35 <50 50 100 Source: Illingworth & Rodkin, Inc./Acoustical Engineers HIGHWAY 101 200 ft from Centerline 100 Q 90 m v 5 o v v Z0 60--------------------------------------------------------------------------- ------------------------- r 50 0 = 40 30 20 12 pm 4 pm 8 pm 12 am 4 am 8 am Hour WILFRED AVENUE 20 ft from Centerline Leq Equivalent Noise Level,The average A -weighted noise level during the measurement -period. Leo The average A -weighted noise levels that are exceeded 10% of the time during the measurement period. 100 Q 90 m v v 80 v -J 70 v Z .60 r �. 50 0 _ 40 30 20 12 pm 4.pm 8 pm 12am 4am Hour CITY OF ROHNERT PARK PETALUMA HILL ROAD 90 ft from Centerline KEISER ROAD 100 ft from Centerline 8am Source:lllingworth & Rodkin, Inc., Measured September 3-5,1997 Road Noise Levels ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING 7. AIR QUALITY This section of the background report presents information on air quality and the State and Federal planning and regulatory framework that has a bearing on the Rohnert Park General Plan Update. "CRITERIA" POLLUTANTS Certain air pollutants, namely ozone, carbon monoxide, airborne particulate matter, and, because of their roles as precursors to ozone, gaseous hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen are referred to as "criteria"pollutants because they are among the select air contaminants for which State and Federal criteria for acceptable ambient air quality have been established. Gaseous pollutants, such as the ozone precursors and carbon monoxide, result from use of fossil fuels and other petrochemical products .in engines, in industrial processes, and in the generation of electrical power. Small particles are also among the products of combustion processes and they are 'released into the atmosphere along with flue and tailpipe gases. However, they are principally generated by other processes which are described below. AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS All of the State and Federal ambient air quality standards are listed in Table 10. There are several State and Federal standards which pertain to pollutants other than the three for which historical data have been provided. Data pertaining to the other pollutants are not listed here, because the County is already well in attainment of all of the standards which apply to them. These standards are intended to limit the adverse health affects of the pollutants. The ozone standards also serve to control damage to crops, natural vegetation and materials. Attainment of the.particulate standards would also place limits on the degradation of visibility— for aviation safety and aesthetic satisfaction. Airborne concentrations of several pollutants are monitored by the San Francisco Bay Area Air Quality Management District (BAAQMD)-at a station in Santa Rosa, 10 miles north of Rohnert Park, while ozone is monitored in Sonoma, approximately 30 miles to the southeast. The highest ozone, carbon monoxide and airborne particulate pollution concentrations which have been recorded in at those stations in each of the last '5 years are listed in Table 11 – 13, along with the annual numbers of days on which concentrations. exceeded the most stringent standards for each of the pollutants. [76] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Source: "California Air Quality", Volume XXVII, Annual Summary, California Air Resources Board. A "ppm" is a part per million; a micro gm/m3 is a microgram per cubic meter. *' There is also a Federal "secondary" standard for sulphur dioxide, which is a goal which is to be pursued after . the primary standard is attained. The criterion level is 0.5 ppm (3 -hour). Pursuant to the provisions of the amended Federal Clean Air Act [ 19901, and subsequent to general declines in the magnitudes of observed ozone and carbon monoxide -concentrations, the San Francisco Bay Area air basin was reclassified in 1995 by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) as being in attainment of Federal ambient clean air criteria for -ozone; an application for attainment status -for carbon monoxide'm urbanized areas is pending (the Bay Area has long been in attainment of the Federal standards for airborne particulate matter but is technically unclassified because of one of the Federal criteria for particulate matter). However, the Bay Area does.not meet the State's more stringent clean air criteria for ozone or airborne particulate. matter. Unfortunately, two years of exceedences of the Federal criterion for ozone attainment due to very hot summers followed the 1995 reclassification, and there is a plan to reclassify the [77) Table 10 AMBIENT AIR QUALITY STANDARDS Pollutant Averaging Time California_ Federal _ Ozone l hour --- �-_ 0.09 ppm* --- 0.12 ---- Carbon Monoxide 8 hours 9.0 ppm 9.0 ppm 1 hour 20 ppm 35 ppm Nitrogen Dioxide y annual arithmetic mean ........................ ....................... 0.053 ppm 1 hour ....................... 0.25 ppm SulphurDioxide** annual arithmetic _ mean ....................... ....................... '0:03 ppm .24 hours ................... 0.04 ppm 0.14 ppm 1 hour ....................... 0.25 ppm Suspended Particles annual geometric PM 10(<10 microns) mean ....................... 30 micro gm/m3* 24 hours ................... 50 micro gm/m3 150 micro gm m3 annual arithmetic :. -mean ........................ ........................ 50 micro gm/m3 Sulfates hours 25 micro gm/m3 Lead _24 30 days 1.5 micro gm/m3 quarter ....................... 1.5 micro gm/m3 Hydrogen Sulphide _calendar 1 hour 0.03 ppm Vinvl Chloride 24 hours_ _ 0.010 ppm Visibility(Particles) 8 hours Extinction (10 am to 6 pm PST) coefficient of 0.23 per kilometer when the RH is less than Source: "California Air Quality", Volume XXVII, Annual Summary, California Air Resources Board. A "ppm" is a part per million; a micro gm/m3 is a microgram per cubic meter. *' There is also a Federal "secondary" standard for sulphur dioxide, which is a goal which is to be pursued after . the primary standard is attained. The criterion level is 0.5 ppm (3 -hour). Pursuant to the provisions of the amended Federal Clean Air Act [ 19901, and subsequent to general declines in the magnitudes of observed ozone and carbon monoxide -concentrations, the San Francisco Bay Area air basin was reclassified in 1995 by the US Environmental Protection Agency (US EPA) as being in attainment of Federal ambient clean air criteria for -ozone; an application for attainment status -for carbon monoxide'm urbanized areas is pending (the Bay Area has long been in attainment of the Federal standards for airborne particulate matter but is technically unclassified because of one of the Federal criteria for particulate matter). However, the Bay Area does.not meet the State's more stringent clean air criteria for ozone or airborne particulate. matter. Unfortunately, two years of exceedences of the Federal criterion for ozone attainment due to very hot summers followed the 1995 reclassification, and there is a plan to reclassify the [77) ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING basin as being a non -attainment area. This issue is discussed further in the following section of this chapter entitled "The Regional Plan". OZONE Summer is the "smog" season, the season for ozone. The.upward escape of pollutants from sources near the ground is then often hampered by a blanketing layer of warm air aloft, an "inversion" layer. Under such conditions the air flow pattern in Sonoma County can be rather complex as a generally northwesterly flow competes with valley flow (the direction from which the wind flows all along the coast is from the northwest, but at sometimes the flow through the gap in the coastal range at Bodega Bay -turns northward inland, to go "up valley". Winds in Rohnert Park are then typically light (e. g.; 5 to 10 miles per hour). Ozone is a colorless gas produced from "precursor" compounds of hydrocarbons and oxides of nitrogen which react in warm air under sunlight over a period of hours. Ozone is not particularly evident near pollution sources, such as roadways, because there is a delay of some hours between emissions of the precursors and peak ozone production. The time between the earliest AM -commute emissions and the daily peak concentration of ozone allows air currents to carry the pollutants tens of miles downwind. Consequently, ozone is found not to be particularly concentrated in highly -urbanized areas, but to be spread out somewhat uniformly throughout the Bay Area, so that it is found even in rural areas which are downwind of heavily urbanized areas. Because ozone concentrations are not found to be particularly concentrated, but to be widespread, it is highly likely that ozone concentrations in Rohnert Park are similar to those in Santa Rosa. Interestingly, ozone in Rohnert Park is not entirely the outgrowth of local emissions because there is a sizeable component which is imported. Some of the ozone precursors from the vehicular and industrial sources within Sonoma County drift into Marin County or Napa County and vice versa. Days on which ozone concentrations exceed the Federal standard do not occur in Sonoma County now, but there is sometimes a year during which the State's criterion level is exceeded on a day or two. Over a period of two decades there has been a downtrend in concentrations which has been substantial, but not substantial enough to be manifest in the most recent 5 years of data [see Table 11]. [78] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Table 11 OZONE DATA— SANTA ROSA AND SONOMA Santa Rosa Sonoma Concentration* Exceedences** Concentration* Ecceedences** Year _ (ppm) (days) (ppm) _(da s) 1991 0.09 0 0.10 3 1992 0.08 0 H 0.09 I 0 1993 0.08 0 0.08 0 1994_ 0.08 0 !I , '_ 0 1995 — 0.10-- 1 —'i _0.09 0.07 —_ 0 1996 +_ 0.08 0 ! 0.09 0 Sources: The BAAQMD and the California Air Resources Board. . "ppm" means parts per million. These are the numbers of days on which concentrations exceeded the State's 1 -hour are listed below in the subsection entitled "Ambient Air Quality Standards". _ _ criterion. The standards CARBON MONOXIDE Winter is the season for carbon monoxide (CO) contamination, as inversion layers are also present.on cold, still winter nights. On such nights, downslope "drainage" flows . reverse the daytime pattern of up-slope, up -valley flow, and for several interim hours in the late evening the atmosphere is almost completely still. Under these conditions high concentrations of air contaminants such as carbon monoxide can develop from local . pollution emissions, for lack of ventilation. The peak 8 -hour concentrations are usually from about 4:00 pm to midnight. Carbon monoxide is a clear, odorless gas. The principal emissions of this pollutant occur as a component of vehicular tailpipe effluence. Consequently, at any time of the day and in any season of the year the greatest concentrations are usually found near roadways. (Recall that ozone is not found to be concentrated near roadways because it is not directly emitted by. vehicles.) Studies of carbon monoxide pollution by the San Francisco BAAQMD and Caltrans have demonstrated that during evenings on which CO concentrations are _particularly elevated there is a rather uniform "cloud" of the gas which persists after commute traffic has waned. Even during such episodes the greatest concentrations are found along roadways, but, during the episodes there is also a large "background" component which builds up under the inversion layer as the air passes over busy roadways— the cloud. The - background exceeds the component that arises from any one roadway. However, these cloud -like concentrations do.not extend much beyond the heavily urbanized areas. [79] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Table 12 CARBON MONOXIDE DATA— SANTA ROSA Santa Rosa Concentration* Exceedences** Year _ (ppm (days) 1991 4.0 0 1992 _ ` 4.0 0 1993 3.8 0 1994 3.5 0 1995 - - 2.8 _ _0 1996 3.0 0 Sources: The BAAQMD and the California Air Resources Board "ppm" means parts per million. These are the numbers of days on which.concentrations exceeded the State and Federal eight-hour criterion level (the State and Federal criterion levels are identical). The standards are listed below in the subsection entitled "Ambient Air Quality Standards ". Because the distance between Rohnert Park and the monitoring station in Santa Rosa is 10 miles, and because Rohnert Park is a substantially less populated community, it is to be expected that the carbon monoxide concentrations in Rohnert Park are substantially less than is suggested by the data most recently collected at the monitoring station in Santa.Rosa [see Table 121. Even the concentrations in Santa Rosa are so low as to suggest that we should not be concerned about exceedences of State or Federal standards. There appears to be a discernible downtrend in Table 11, but such apparent short-term trends can be misleading. However, there has also been a long-term downtrend in CO concentrations; twenty years ago concentrations were clearly higher. PARTICULATE MATTER - Wind and fire cause particulate matter to become airborne. In urban areas conditions exist that cause dirt.to be -transported onto roadways where it is pulverized and "re- suspended". Construction.and demolition activities also directly release particles or cause dirt to be deposited on roadways where the same action of pulverization and re- suspension occurs. Tire wear is another source of airborne particulate matter in urban areas. In agricultural areas, tilling of fields is a seasonal source of airborne particulate matter, as is the burning of agricultural wastes. ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Table 13 AIRBORNE PARTICULATE DATA— SANTA ROSA Santa Rosa Concentration I Exceedences* Year (micro_erarns per cubic meter) (days) 1994 61 12** 1995 46 0 1996 — { 0 Sources: The BAAQMD and the California Air Resources Board. Note: Data are.not available for Sonoma County for'years prior to 1994 These are the estimated numbers of days on which concentrations exceeded the State's 24-hour'"PM 10" standard- extrapolated to a 365 -day year from 30 to 60 samples per year. The standards are listed below in the subsection entitled "AinbientAir Quality Standards". There was in fact only one measured day of exceedence out of 31 samples, so this extrapolated value may overestimate the number of days of exceedence. The air quality monitoring station in Santa Rosa also provides airborne particulate data, but this information is not necessarily representative of concentrations in Rohnert Park, as local sources of particulate matter may sometimes predominate over the more uniform "background" concentrations. Thus, the data of Table 13 should not be taken as accurate indications of conditions in Rohnert Park. It is likely that the State's particulate standard is exceeded only once or twice in any given year, because only a few monitoring stations in rural and "wet" areas of California consistently report no days on which concentrations exceeded the State's standard for airborne particulate matter. EMISSIONS INVENTORY The BAAQMD and the California Air Resources Board keep track of pollution sources in the San Francisco Air Basin. Table 14 shows the Sonoma County emissions inventory. Roads and vehicles are the predominate sources of carbon monoxide, oxides of nitrogen and airborne particles. Among all of the gaseous hydrocarbons are some which are prone to react with oxides of nitrogen to produce ozone, the reactive organics (ROG). They normally comprise about 90 percent or so of all of the vehicular emissions of hydrocarbons. Methane gas, a hydrocarbon of low reactivity, .is predominate among the non -vehicular emissions of hydrocarbons. The organic solvents which are used in glues, in paints and other coatings and for various industrial purposes are also a significant component of the hydrocarbon emissions. The component, of all of the tonnage of all the particles which are lifted into the atmosphere, which consists of particles sized at less than ten microns is denoted by PM10 (which has been described above). Road dust from unpaved roads accounts for almost all of Sonoma County's PM 10 emissions; very little is from tire wear or tailpipe emissions. [81] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING Table 14 SONOMA COUNTY EMISSIONS (1995)— TONS/DAY Solvent Evaporation I': 4.3 Oxides Particulate Miscellaneous Processes* Reactive Carbon of Matter Year Organics Monoxide Nitrogen (PM 10) Mobile Sources i, Stationary Sources ! 18 170 20 0.5 Fuel Combustion . 0.1 1.2 1.1 0.1 Waste Disposal 0.3 i — — 0.3 Cleaning & Surface Coatings ii 1.6 — — — Petroleum Production & Marketing {j 0.5— Industrial Processes 0.8 ;; — — 1.2 Totals:ii 3.3 j 1.2 I.1 1.5 Area -Wide Sources Solvent Evaporation I': 4.3 Miscellaneous Processes* 2.7 '! 28 1.4 d 9.9 Totals: 7.0 1 28 Ijl 1.4 9.9 Mobile Sources i, On -Road Motor Vehicles** ! 18 170 20 0.5 Other Mobile Sources 3 32 6 0.3 Totals: 21 1 200 25 0.9 Source: The California Air Resources Board. Note: Roundoff error prevents the columns from adding up exactly in some cases. * Particulate matter emissions for this subcategory are dominated by paved -road dust [2.8 tons/day] and residential fuel consumption (2.6 tons/day]. '* The particulate matter emissions pertain to tire wear and direct tailpipe emissions only. LOCAL STATIONARY SOURCES OF TOXIC AIR CONTAMINANTS In addition to having vehicular traffic as it's major source of air pollution, Sonoma County contains industrial facilities, some of which emit toxic air contaminants. The BAAQMD has an ongoing program that was established by State legislation [AB -2588) requires it to obtain emissions estimates from emitters of toxic -air contaminants, to prioritize assessment of the reported emissions according to risk, and to require in turn that the owners or operators of the riskiest sites prepare full risk assessments. The latest publication of such emissions by the District is dated 1995, so that the data are not -current.' .136 that As it may, the District lists only 4 dry cleaning establishments as sources of toxic air contaminants in Rohnert Park. The District's rankings of these facilities according to risk do not place any of them beyond risk level "0", which is a category for facilities for which risk reduction is not required. ""'Toxic Air Contaminant Control Program—Annual Report 1995 Volume II", BAAQMD [82] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING THE REGIONAL PLAN The BAAQMD has primarily has jurisdiction over stationary sources of air pollution; it has no land use control jurisdiction except where exercise of its jurisdiction over stationary sources has the indirect side effect of controlling land use. Thus the District would not have a role in regulating emissions due to changes in vehicular traffic that could be attributed to the proposed revisions in Rohnert Park's general plan. The BAAQMD currently is working on a draft Clean Air Plan (CAP) to achieve and maintain state air quality standards. Two new transportation control measures have implications for the General Plan Update: 1) promote traffic calming and 2) advocate planning and design of development to facilitate pedestrian travel. The Bay Area's CAP is updated every three years. Portions of this plan also respond to federal mandates for clean air and show how the National Air Quality Standards are to be achieved and maintained. The State Air Quality Standards, which are set by the California Air Resources Board, are somewhat more stringent then the federal standards (see Table 10). For ozone, the State standard is 0.09 parts per million (ppm) over a one-hour time period, versus a federal standard of 0.08 ppm over an 8 -hour time period. In July 1997, the Federal Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) changed the federal ozone standard from 0.12 ppm for a one-hour period to 0.08 ppm for an 8 -hour period, but planners at the air quality. management district believe the state standard is more stringent". The EPA also has proposed that the San Francisco Bay Area be re -designated a non attainment area for federal air quality standards. This proposed action is in response to the violations of air quality that occurred during the hot summers of 1995 and 1996, just after the Bay Area was designated an attainment area. The EPA believes that had the revised federal standard been in place the last two years, the Bay Area would have violated the standard even more.` By contrast, air quality this past summer has been quite good, with no violations of federal standards reported according to BAAQMD planners". The EPA proposed action 8,.currently subject to public review and comment; a final decision ',on whether the Bay. Area will have to prepare a new attainment plan for federal standards will be made by the end of this year. CRITERIA FOR SIGNIFICANCE In 1996, the BAAQMD published guidelines for the environmental assessment of urban projects. The guidelines imply that the impact of a single project of any kind should be declared to be significant if, during the operational phase of the project, project -generated emissions exceed certain thresholds, or, local concentrations of carbon monoxide are " David Marshall, Bay Area Air Quality Management District, personal communication, September 29, 1997. " EPA Press Release, "US EPA proposes adjustment of Bay Area Study Stakes", August 21, 1997. Ibid. [83] ROHNERT PARK GENERAL PLAN UPDATE ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING elevated past the State or Federal criterion level because of the project (it is very unlikely that such carbon monoxide exceedences would occur in Rohnert Park, but, sizable projects could easily produce emissions of other contaminants which exceed the threshold criteria). The cumulative impacts of several projects which are planned or approved at the same time are deemed to be significant— even if none of the impacts of the constituent projects are deemed to be significant— if the overall cumulative effect is not planned for in the District's Clean Air Plan. This could happen, according to the guidelines document, if the local general plan is consistent with the District's Clean Air Plan (CAP) but the. projects are cumulatively not consistent with the local general plan, or, it could happen if the local general planisnot consistent with the CAP. The BAAQMD would prefer that local General Plans be consistent with the District's CAP". The Guidelines state that "general plans of cities and counties must show consistency with regional plans and policies affecting air quality to claim a less than significant impact on air quality", where consistency is principally to be determined: with regard for the District's own planning assumptions about growth rates for population and vehicle -miles -traveled, -and, by assessing the degree to which the District's planned transportation control measures are implemented by the local plan. " However, the guidelines only represent the -opinions of the staff of the Planning Division of the District, they have not been approved by the District's Board of Directors. Environmental Setting for City of Rohnert Park General Plan Update I Prepared for StUrtz R E G 1 0 fit TOS�RI�SLAND MIT IN���N Gunter Franz Hartmut Schwerdtfeger 4 ,A: Gunter Franz Hartmut Schwerdtfeger 7 4 ,A: Stu rtz R E G I 0 OSTFRIESLAND Nordseekuste and ostfriesische Inseln locken jedes Jahr Tausende in die Ferien. Leuchtturme, Wind- muhlen and romantische Fischerdorfer erinnern an die »gute alte Zeit((, als die Gronlandfahrer noch zum Walfang ausfuhren. Die einzigartige Wattlandschaft, Wiesen and Weiden, soweit das Auge reicht, sowie die Eigenart and Lebensfreude der Ostfriesen machen das Land liebens- and lebenswert. ISBN 3-8003-1020-1 C POSM044WALD 049 Wk*POML at ST -ADT.., A., Sam Salmon V. Update on Progress with Sales Tax Initiative: Report of Polling Results - INFORMATION "rwa spiro VI. Petaluma to Novato Section of Highway 101 Issues - DISCUSSION/ACTION Le mer �� Ca I r RorwcRr o K S . - • Phut Eric 27edricli "CA°°°U^° VII. Fact Sheet of Sonoma/Marin Projects and Costs - DISCUSSION/ACTION SONOMA COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY AGENDA_ -------- October 20, 1997 - nv to ea. _ 3:15 p.m. COZ)V to 10-2Y-?74(- o-2Y-y7sPermit Permitand Resource Management Department iYJ to 2550 Ventura Avenue 'L 42Py to SCTA Staff Planning. Commission Hearing Room .... Susanna Willard Santa Rosa, California Ike Uzcv c Dwccron �16 Directors ITEM Paul Kelley, Chair s°"°"'`°""^' 0;- I. Public Comment 1 �' Sharon wright, V. Chair 5w . woe. 1,g9 1 ��!/���'� Sonoma County 11. Consent Item (Attachment) -ACTION F�Tp t� A. Minutes of September 8, 1997 Meeting . `qR k Same Ph":5277-1943 CA 95403 Phone: III. Reports - INFORMATION/ACTION SandraEillesA. Update on NWP (Director Harberson) Vieec� "'"" B. MTC Report (Director Wright) J°^'°° Harbaion C. SCTA Staff Report b udS et idLL� i �lev� 5 845? U n.et Glee -ds , D. CAC Report (Bob Anderson, Chair) Robed Jahn E. TAC Report (Allan Tilton, Chair) 6'-1k5 's David Kellar F. Legislative Update hb5gS-(,rej;0.&A gas t,,-) b �1=e `arc 1Ske�. PcrKuw G 1t t L Go rnwn ��iGe 5 �aCt- StCtX�' W ar1� o h ( LouaRanPeni IV. Summary of SB 45 and Its Implications - INFORMATION Sam Salmon V. Update on Progress with Sales Tax Initiative: Report of Polling Results - INFORMATION "rwa spiro VI. Petaluma to Novato Section of Highway 101 Issues - DISCUSSION/ACTION Le mer �� Ca I r RorwcRr o K S . - • Phut Eric 27edricli "CA°°°U^° VII. Fact Sheet of Sonoma/Marin Projects and Costs - DISCUSSION/ACTION VIII. Report on the October 1, 1997 JEC Meeting and Input to the Executive Committee for the Next JEC Meeting - DISCUSSION/ACTION IX. Amendments to the SCTA/County Contract - DISCUSSION/INFORMATION X. Obligation of ISTEA Funds in Sonoma County - INFORMATION AND CONGRATULATIONS 00 '/.0 K XL_ Schedule Next Executive Committee Meeting - DISCUSSION/ACTION SCTA Staff .... Susanna Willard XII. Authority Member Comments - DISCUSSION Uzcv c Dwccron Melinda Grosch �'11 XIII. Adjoumment -..ACTION Patricia Stoddard Sccwcrwr. Sonoma County Transportation Authority 2550 Ventura Averwe Same Ph":5277-1943 CA 95403 Phone: The next S C T A meeting will be held NOVEMBER 10, 1997 Fax: 527-1103 MULTI -MODAL TRANSPORTATION & LAND USE STUDY Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman Copy to io ioV 9 Copy to qL/v z Copy to FINAL REPORT JUNE 6,1997 Prepared For The Sonoma County Transportation Authority and The Marin Countywide Planning Agency Funded -By Caltrans Prepared By Calthorpe Associates Fehr & Peers Associates Economic and Planning Systems Pittman & Hames with Morrison Knudson Market Perspectives Allan Nichol WTra_ ns . MIG Carlile/Associates John Fregonese Healdsburg r *� I, 0 Windsor �jyss�n S- North rp° South HOV Santa t North{ Climbing - Lane cotati North ,10 i\o Sonth 2 , •r HOV 90 0� Petaluma . •tNov North t South HOV '\ SAN \ PAOLO sAr S O N O M A/ MARIN M U L T I- M O D A L T P A N S P O R T A T I O N AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT EXECUTIVE- SUMMARY The Study The creation of a balanaced, integrated transportation system and land use pattern can improve the quality of life for North Bay residents. A major concern of residents and businesses is congestion on Highway 101 and sprawling land use patterns. Every day, thousands of commuters patiently make their way through congestion on Highway 101. Often, during the mid-day, the combination of truck and auto traffic can result in delays. Simultaneously, citizens worry about dwindling open space, towns growing together, and a loss of identity for the North Bay. While Highway 101 congestion is the focus of many people's concerns, effects can be felt throughout the North Bay in many ways. These effects include: congestion and large volumes of traffic on parallel arterial roads; minimal or inadequate transit service; congestion on weekends; and, potentially high fees on new development. These issues have led some to question the amount"and location of growth in the North Bay. In order to identify sol it±q_-ts- te' +hest pervasive problems, a team was formed including Caltrans, the Sonoma County Transportation Authority (SCTA), and the Marin Countywide Planning Agency. The team sponsored the preparation of the Sonoma/Marin Multi -Modal transportation and Land Use Study, charged with the task of - "determining how to most efficiently spend public money on transportation improvements and how to create a pattern of land use that can most efficiently take best advantage of transportation options while maintaining a high quality of life for Sonoma and Marin County residents." In order to determine the best and most effieicnt transportation network and urban form for the North Bay, five transportation and two land use scenarios were evaluated. These scenarios included a wide range of potential improvments such as High Occupany Vehicle (HOV) lanes, reconfigured freeway interchanges, improvements to state highways and local roads, the introduction of commuter railservice, improvements to the existing bus transit system, and bicycle and pedestrian improvements. The land use analysis explored the effects of focusing some new mixed-use development in locations with good access to transit. From the. analysis of .these scenarios, a Preferred Scenario was prepared which incorporates the most effective components of each. The Preferred Scenario addresses short-term needs through investments in Highway 101 and other roads, and.recommends that planning and implementation of commute rail service begin as soon as possible. The rail and bus transit Systems, along with the recommended compact and mixed-use land use poattern are long term investments which can create alternatives to single -occupant automobile trips. These Vi • JUNE 6, 1997-_• CALTHORPE ASSOCIATES CONSULTING TEAM S O N O M A/ MARIN M U L T I- M O D A L T R A N S P O R T A T I O N AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT alternatives will be needed in the future as growing automobile use will inevitably lead to cr.,rgestion of the road system. - The transportation and land use components of the Preferred Scenario are based on analysis and refinement of the Draft Preferred Scenario, which was based on the analysis of five previously evaluated Land Use and Transportation Scenarios. This Report is divided into three chapters: • Existing Conditions and Base Case • Transportation and Land Use Scenarios • Preferred Scenario These chapters were originally submitted as collections of Working Papers, prepared over the course of the Study. Findings from the Working Papers were used to develop and evaluate the Scenarios. T , , EXISTING CONDITIONS AND BASE CASE In order to fully understand the transportation and land use issues that effect travel behavior along Highway 101 in Sonoma and Marin Counties, extensive research and analysis of existing conditions was conducted. The following is an overview of these findings. Current Trends and Policies This section provides an overview of existing transportation, economic, employment, labor population and land use trends and policies in Sonoma and Marin Counties. Trends indicate that travel in both counties will continue to be predominantly by automobile, with a large majority, of single -occupancy -vehicles during peak periods. While some "pipeline" highway improvements have been funded, fiscal constraints and public response to congestion create considerable challenges for policy makers; transportation policies in both counties place a priority on achieving a balanced set of investments for highway, rail, bus transit, ferry, and non -motorized transportation. Demographic analysis shows that the two counties taken together have roughly proportional shares of the Bay Area's job and households. The employment mix in the North Bay differs from the rest of the Bay Area with higher portion of retail jobs and lower portions of manufacturing jobs. There are differences between the counties, with Marin County having considerably higher household incomes, and more jobs in the finance, insurance, real estate, and service sectors. Sonoma County has higher concentrations of jobs in the construction, agriculture, and mining sectors. CALTHORPE ASSOCIATES CONSULTING TEAM 0 JUNE 6, 1997 • vii S O N O M A/ MAR IN M U L T I- MODALTRANS PORTATION AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT Land use patterns and policies in. Marin and Sonoma Counties show strong similarities although Marin is at a later stage of development with mostly infill and redevelopment sites available, while Sonoma is likely to experience substantial new growth in some areas. Review of General Plan capacities, current projects, and planning policies shows existing land use policies and plans have the potential for protecting the urban form and character. Base Case Demand Forecast This section includes preliminary transportation forecasts for a base case condition for year 2015, generally representing the results of the implementation of the Congestion Management Program(CMP) Scenario. The results of these forecasts have been used to assist in the evaluation of the Study's various transportation and land use Scenarios. It also provides a description of the transportation model used to develop. Study forecasts. The forecast indicates the proportion of trips that are internal to both Sonoma and Marin counties in the future will increase as more jobs and households are added. This continues trends that have been occurring over the past ten years. The forecast shows a high proportion,of.trips may c ori,.:. L ._-ansik, i.t areas served well by transit. For example, throughout most of Marin County and most downtowns and major employment centers in Sonoma County that are well served by transit and have a corresponding higher transit mode split. By contrast, the transit mode shares for Sonoma County overall and along the Highway 101 Corridor are significantly less due to the provision of minimal transit service under the Base Case. Highway 101 LOS will be poor in 2015 under the Base Case with operating conditions at LOS "E" or "F" during the A.M. and P.M. peaks. This will result in the peak period con- gestion extending throughout longer hours of the morning and afternoons. Transportation Funding Policies The purpose of this section is to present funding opportunities potentially available to the roadway and transit system improvements which were evaluated in the Study. It examines existing and proposed federal and state funding.funding sources. In addition, the report reviews the status of recent regional funding initiatives. The remainder focuses upon potential local funding initiatives such as developer fees, user fees, tolls, and congestion pricing mechanisms. Lastly, the section sets forth the beginnings of a financial implementation strategy for a -unified. Sonoma and, Marin _ multi -modal transportation package. It should be noted that this. "section was prepared in advance of a Preferred Transportation/ Land Use Scenario. It provided a general overview of potential funding sources. The final recommended financial plan was prepared in Phase 3 of the project to Viii 0 JUNE 6, 1997 • CAL7_HORP.E A.sso.cIATES CONSULTING TEAM S O N O M A/ MARIN MULTI - M O D A L T R A N S P O R T A T I O N AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT provide more detail for specific funding sources as applied to the final Preferred Transportation and La. ncl rase Scenario. It can be found in Chapter III of this Report. II. TRANSPORTATION AND LAND USE SCENARIOS In order to determine how to most efficiently spend public money on transportation improvements, and what the best land use pattern for taking advantage of the improvements would be, five transportation and two land use Scenarios were defined and evaluated. This chapter includes the following four sections: • Description of the Scenarios; • Preliminary Capital and Operating Cost Estimates; • Analysis of Transportation and Land Use Scenarios; and, • Public Events and Involvement. The results of each of these sections were evaluated and used to establish a Preferred Transportation and Land Use Scenario. The Scenarios This Study looked at a range of potential transportation improvements in addition to those already planned for the North Bay. It also looked at changes in land use patterns to determine the correlation between these changes and travel behavior. Some potential transportation improvements which were evaluated include: HOV lanes, improvements to State Highways, arterial and local road improvements, commuter rail service along the Northwestern Pacific Railroad line, bus system enhancements, and bikeway and pedestrian investments. Two land use alternatives were evaluated: Existing Policy, which assumes that existing general plans, specific plans and other relevant planning documents are implemented as they.are defined. today; and, an alternative policy which encourages a more compact mixed-, use pattern at various "Opportunity Areas" in the North Bay. The land use scenarios are tied to the Association of Bay Area Governments (ABAG) growth projections for the year 2015. The two alternatives vary the distribution of projected growth. Capital and Operating .Cost.Estimates In order to fully understand the long-term funding issues associated with the scenarios, , preliminary capital and operating costs were prepared for each. An important underlying assumption is that the Highway 101 improvements evaluated in each scenario are limited to those associated with HOV lanes within the existing right-of-way, and do not include the introduction of mixed -flow lanes. CALTHORPE ASSOCIATES CONSULTING TEAM • JUNE 6, 1997 • ix SO NO to A / :Vt AR IN MULTI -:M O DALT R ANS PO RTATIO N AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT Ea.ch,,scenario integrates specific transportation improvements with land, use policies an,' expected levels of available funding. These include investments in Highway 101, other State Highways, local roads and arterials, commute rail, bus systems, and pedestrian and bicycle improvements. This section provides preliminary cost estimates which are based on specific projects i identified in recent studies, current project programming, and new costs for projects identified in this Study. The cost estimates were prepared at a planning level of detail, and have been subject to refinement throughout the preparation of the Study. Order of magnitude cost estimates prepared for the Scenarios indicate that Scenario B is the most costly, about $1.1 billion, with a net _unfunded cost. of about $800 million. Scenario D would have a lower total cost of about $550 million .and. a net unfunded cost of about _$300 mullion. Scenarios A and C have the. same. transportation improvements and would be _ about $10—million, less—expensive than Scenario D. Of the various transportation improvements analyzed, those to Highway 101 would be the most costly. Scenario 'D' would have the highest net unfunded annual operating cost of $20 million, \ hile SLenario 'B` would have the lowest, at $13 million( Scenarios A and C �•�3 rry. a :,' have the base _rail_ system,,. would have a net unfunded .annual operating cost off- ------- -- approximately $13.5 million. / Looking for Solutions The four Scenarios and a Base Case were modeled and the results analyzed to measure the effects of various land use policies, transportation improvements and levels of funding. The Base Case includes current land use policies, funded transportation improvements, and transit service. Upon analysis it was learned that there would be little difference between the scenarios' - congestion levels on Highway 101 during the AM peak commute. This occurs because there are relatively minor differences between.. the Scenario's southbound improvements to/-~ Highway 101. In addition, mixed -flow lanes would remain largely unchanged. Another factor contributing to this lack of change is travel behavior. As capacity on Highway 101 increases, motorists who would otherwise delay a trip, or travel on local roads can use 101. This is referred to as "latent demand." Each of the Scenarios would have more bus ridership than the Base Case. North Bay bus ridership would be the highest in Scenario B, at over 44,000 daily riders, while the Base Case and Scenario C would be the lowest at just over 25,000. This indicates that bus service utilizing the continuous HOV lanes on 101 would be an attractive mode of transit. x • JUNE. 6, 1997 • CALTHORPE ASSOCIATES CONSULTING TEAM S O N O M A/ M ARIN MULTI - M O D A L T R A N S P O R T A T I O N AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT The analysis of rail ridership _provides evidence that it is sensitive to both land use patterns and frequency of service. The Base Case ai-,ci Scertario .S. -do not have a rail system. The rail system in Scenario A would have approximately 6,000 daily riders, while Scenario C, which uses the alternative land use pattern would nearly double that to 11,200. This doubling reflects the improved access to transit provided by the compact and mixed-use land use pattern. Scenario D, with the maximum rail system would double ridership again to 24,300. This would occur because of the alternative land use pattern, and improved service frequency. The goal of this effort was to learn from the comparative analysis, and to fashion a Preferred Scenario that combines the most useful and valued elements of each. This hybrid scenario was then studied for its economic, land use and traffic implications. Analysis of the Scenarios The analysis of the five Scenarios resulted in the following key conclusions: There is No Silver Bullet — None of the Scenarios significantly reduce congestion on 101, because 101 is both a freeway -and "main street' for much of the North Bay. Therefore, it accommodates the -bulk -of north/south traffic in the corridor. No Scenario Will Substantially Change Fundamental Travel Behavior — The increment of growth between 1995 and 2015 is not large enough to change the fundamental character of the North Bay; also people in the future will most likely have a strong propensity to drive. Rail Works — All of the Scenarios with rail .transit -had more ridership than expected. Rail can be implemented with a relatively low cost, because the major element of its infrastructure is already in place and publicly owned. Bus/HOV Lane is the Least Cost Effective Transit Investment — A continuous Bus/HOV lane is more expensive than the rail system on a net cost per new trip basis. The Benefits of HOV Lanes Vary Along the Corridor — The HOV lane is more effective at relieving congestion on certain sections of Highway 101. For example, the section between Cotati and Petaluma is relatively uncongested (LOS D) in all the Scenarios; so, HOV is not necessary in this section. Compact Land Use Policies are Not Necessary Everywhere — Some Opportunities Areas are less effective at reducing traffic impacts on.101 and improving rail ridership than others, such as those in Cloverdale and other outlying areas. Also, some Opportunity Areas may not be politically viable. CALTHORPE ASSOCIATES CONSULTING TEAM 0 JUNE 6, 1997 ® Xi S O N O M A/ MARIN MULTI - M O D A L T R A N S P O R T A T I O N AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT Public Participation Public participation as a prc;m ilnent component rof - the Study, and played a key role throughout the planning process. The following is an overview of this process. Joint Executive Meetings The -Consultant Team participated in a series of regular meetings with the JEC. During these meetings, staff and the Consultant Team presented and discussed key project assumptions, findings, issues, and scheduling items. The meetings included open discussion between JEC members and the Consultant Team as well as members of the public, who were invited to attend each meeting.. These meetings were beneficial in keeping JEC members informed about the Study and in allowing the consultant to receive direct input from JEC members and the public. Focus Group Sessions Calthorpe Associates facilitated three focus group sessions (design workshops) which allowed members of the community to participate in the preparation of alternative land use and circulation plans for one of three Opportunity Sites identified in the Study. Participants wor`:r _' -i�� s..:il groups. to create conceptual. plans for their site. The sessions were, held in Larkspur, Petaluma, and Santa Rosa. From these sessions, three Synthesis Plans were developed, illustrating implementation of the alternative land use scenario at these sites. Symposium and Open Houses The consultant hosted four public Symposia and series of five Open Houses throughout the North Bay. During these events the Study was introduced, its various components described, findings of the Alternatives phase, and the Preferred Scenario presented. A major component of these events was the often lively question and answer period which followed the consultant's.. presentation. These events provided the public with a first hand opportunity to discuss the project. An opinion questionnaire was distributed to the _public, collected and reviewed. Demonstration Run of a Diesel Light Rail Vehicle In a collaborative effort, the Consultant Team, staff, Siemens, Northwestern Pacific Railroad and Amtrak worked to arrange a two day demonstration run of a Diesel Light Rail Vehicle (DLRV) on the Northwestern Pacific rail corridor. The DLRV did a whistle stop tour of the corridor stopping. at six railroad stations, giving rides to the public. This event was very well attended and publicized. - xii • JUNE 6, 1997 • CALTHORPE AsSOC.IATES CONSULTING TEAM SO NO M A % M AR IN M ULTI- M O DALT R ANS PO RTATIO N AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT Information Flyers, News Letters and Press Releases In an on-going :effort to distribute information to the public, the coy.sultan' prcn-tired a variety of announcements describing the Study, the planning process, description of the scenarios, findings and upcoming events. These documents have been mailed, faxed and hand delivered to the public, agencies, and the press. Preliminary Conclusions Each of the four Scenarios, as well as the Base Case were analyzed by the Consultant Team. The results of the analysis were presented in series of public events and, are explained in this Chapter. Each of the Scenarios would result in some modification to travel patterns in Sonoma and Marin Counties, and some extent of congestion along the Highway 101 corridor. However, based on the analysis presented, it is clear that no one Scenario, or single modification would greatly reduce congestion along the 101 Corridor. It is apparent instead that improved circulation will be best improved if a multi -faceted transportation system is developed. This hybrid system will likely include a combination of several improvements: additional HOV lanes and other improvements to 101, improvements to the regional arterial network, bus and rail transit improvements, and a variety of pedestrian ar rovefinents. Interestingly, this preliminary conclusion was shared by many of the participants of the Symposium and Open Houses, who also concluded that a highway or rail only solution would not be the most appropriate solution for the North Bay. III. PREFERRED SCENARIO Goals for the Preferred Scenario Upon completion of the analysis of the five scenarios, the following goals were established to help shape the Draft Preferred Scenario: • Maximize the Effectiveness of Transportation Investments; • Maximize Mobility for North Bay Residents; • Improve the Ability to Move Commercial Goods in the North Bay; • Maximize Access to State and Federal Funding; • Broaden Support within the North Bay; Complement Existing Land Use Patterns; • Build on Existing Transportation Systems; and • Plan for Long Range Future of the North Bay. CALTHO RPE ASSOCIATES CONSULTING TEAM • JUNE 6, 1997 • Xiii SONO MA/ MAKIN M ULTI-MODALT RANSPORTATION AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT Draft Preferred Scenario The Draft Preferred Scenario was intended to pwvide a balanced transportation network with significant investment in highway, road, transit, and pedestrian and bicycle facilities. Before establishing the Draft Preferred Scenario, a Preliminary Draft Preferred Scenario was presented to, and discussed with .the JEC. During several meetings, the Draft Preferred Scenario was developed. It includes a mixed-use and compact land use pattern were it would be most effective in complementing the transportation system. The following is an outline of the Draft Preferred Scenario's elements. Several changes were made to this list prior to the modeling of the Draft Preferred Scenario. Critical elements eliminated from the project description are identified with a strike-eur and new improvements are identified .with SMALL CAPS. Transportation Elements Highway 101 Improvements • north and southbound HOV lanes from Windsor River Road to River Road; • North and southbound HOV lanes from River Road/Mark West Road north of Santa Rosa to SR 116/Gravenstein H;oht'V,, , in CcLat ; • Northbound climbing lane between Cotati and Petaluma; • North and southbound HOV lanes in Petaluma from Old Redwood Highway to Lakeville Road/SR 116; Rnpr-eve 101 te fFeeway status between Petaluma Bridge and Ney ate and, • Completion of the "Gap Closure" project in Marin County. - Other State Highway Improvements • Improvements to SR 12 at Llano Road; • Improvements to SR 116 in south Petaluma; ; and, • I-580 overcrossing from Anderson Drive to Kerner Boulevard. . Local Arterial Road Improvements Improvements to local arterials were included with a focus on serving regional traffic. The improvements included in the Draft Preferred Scenario were a compromise between the "constrained" and the "expanded" funding list. X1V • JUNE 6, 1997 • CALTHORPE ASSOCIATES CONSULTING TEAM S O N O M A/ MARIN MULTI - M O D A L T R A N S P O R T A T I O N AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT Rail Transit The rail- transit sys Lm in the Draft Preferred Scenario was a hybrid of the systems evaluated in Scenarios C and D. Rail station locations were revised to maximize projected ridership. The system would include 14 primary stations and 5 secondary stations, and be served by trains with 15 to 20 minute headways in the peak direction and 30 minutes in the off-peak direction during the commute, and 30 minute headways throughout the remainder of the day. Bus Transit Bus service in the Draft Preferred Scenario would be similar to that in Scenario D, with a focus on providing feeder service to the rail stations and providing a higher level of local service. Limited regional bus service would be continued by GGT from the North Bay to San Francisco where it is the most effective transit alternative. Ferry Service The Draft Preferred Scenario included physical site improvements at Larkspur Landing and the iddi-tinn of new.vaSsels. Service frequency would be coordinated with the frequency of rail Pedestrian and Bicycle Systems The Draft Preferred Scenario included the same non -motorized improvements as the two "expanded" funding Scenarios in the earlier analysis; nearly $31 million in currently unfunded improvements in the North Bay. Total Transportation Investment A goal of the Draft Preferred Scenario's transportation network was to contain costs so that funding could be achieved using one new local funding source, such as a sales tax in each county. The total initial unfunded capital cost estimate of $621.81 million is within this range, and is also over 10% less ($84.05 million) than the total unfunded cost of Scenario B. However, as additional analysis and research was completed it was determined that the capital cost of the Draft Preferred Scenario exceeded the initially estimated figure by approximately $44 million. Land Use Pattern The goal of the compact and mixed-use land use pattern used in Scenarios C and D, in the alternatives analysis phase of the project, was to test the impact of this land use pattern on travel behavior in the North Bay. The analysis showed that some aspects of the new land use pattern were valuable. The analysis also indicated that land use changes are more CALTHORPE ASSOCIATES CONSULTING TEAM • JUNE 6, 1997 • Xv SONO M A% V1 ARIN M ULTI- M O DALT RANS PO RTATIO N AND LAND USE STUDY FINAL REPORT effective in some locations than in others. Public feedback on the mixed-use compact land use pattern has varied from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. These findings were considered in preparing the recommended land use pattern for the Draft Preferred Scenario. The general approach in both counties was to reduce the number of Opportunity Areas, particularly those on the fringe of urban development. Also, the capacity of some Opportunity Areas has been reduced to reflect comments from local jurisdictions. - Analysis of the Draft Preferred Scenario The Draft Preferred Scenario underwent an an process similar to the analysis that was performed on the five Land Use and Transportation Scenarios. Cost estimates for the transportation elements of the Draft Preferred Scenario were also finalized, and these costs were compared with funding projections to test the financial viability of the Draft Preferred Scenario. The JEC was given a progress report on this analysis at their March 19 meeting. The final analysis was reviewed at the April 16 and 23 JEC meetings. Based on a review of the analysis, final revisions to the Draft Preferred Scenario were made. Final Preferred Scenario The final analysis of the Preferred Scenario was presented to the JEC at the April 23 meeting where it was finalized as the Preferred Scenario. The final Study. Report was reviewed and approved at the May 21 JEC meeting. It was determined that the Preferred Scenario would be more effective at meeting the North Bay's transportation needs than the CMP, and be more cost effective than Scenario B, the maximum highway and bus solution. -The Preferred Scenario would be effective because it is a balanced transportation network, including highway, bus, rail, bicycle, and pedestrian improvements. XVi • JUNE 6, 1,997 • CALTHORPE ASSOCIATES CONSULTING TEAM Pest -It®- Feric Note 7671 Date y- 9 ,�, or pagges To Cw a � J From ud Co./Dept.D Pr e e Co. �f Phone # Phone # 2LL 2,21 Fax #sZ _ 7.73 WYE:eree e ex rTA � �QuEs�r�. INTEROFFICE IVIEMORANDUP TO: The Honorable Mayor and Members of the City Council RE: Creekside Annexation Update 1. FROM: 4h D. etter, City Manager DATE: October 23, 1997 Planning and Community Development Director Wendie Schulenburg and I have been meeting with representatives from the Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District, including Jan Heff-on, Superintendent; Ann Huber, Business and Finance; and Ray Carlson, Engineer regarding the Creekside Annexation. The Creekside Annexation is scheduled for the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) on its November 6, 1997 agenda. We also have met with Steve Sharpe, Executive Director of LAFCO and have spoken with Tim Smith, 3rd District Supervisor, regarding this matter. Supervisor Smith indicates that this annexation will be extremely difficult, as the piecemeal annexation, from a broader. sense, will become the issue. He indicated at one meeting that it may be difficult to garner support from any of the LAFCO Commissioners. Today I' spoke more extensively with Steve Sharpe, who indicated the Chairman of LAFCO, Mike Cale, has the following major concerns: The spot annexation issue is real and an attempt may be to use this particular annexation as an example to not allow spot annexations. 2. Mike Cale communicated his knowledge of Rohnert Park's process to update its General Plan and develop a more extensive service area, including the sphere of influence and specific plan areas. He is more inclined to suggest that any annexations be held off until the City completes its General Plan update process. The main concern seems to center on the piecemeal annexation approach as well as the use of the back twenty 20 acres of the School District site, which has not been identified by `a' specific development plan. Even if the School District attempted to annex just the school site alone with the elimination of the back twenty (20) acres, the spot annexation issue may become the stumbing block. In meeting with the School District, city staff has recommended the following options: r Copy to ea. Cou,�,C:,man Copy to Copy to C y 4�. 1. FROM: 4h D. etter, City Manager DATE: October 23, 1997 Planning and Community Development Director Wendie Schulenburg and I have been meeting with representatives from the Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District, including Jan Heff-on, Superintendent; Ann Huber, Business and Finance; and Ray Carlson, Engineer regarding the Creekside Annexation. The Creekside Annexation is scheduled for the Local Agency Formation Commission (LAFCO) on its November 6, 1997 agenda. We also have met with Steve Sharpe, Executive Director of LAFCO and have spoken with Tim Smith, 3rd District Supervisor, regarding this matter. Supervisor Smith indicates that this annexation will be extremely difficult, as the piecemeal annexation, from a broader. sense, will become the issue. He indicated at one meeting that it may be difficult to garner support from any of the LAFCO Commissioners. Today I' spoke more extensively with Steve Sharpe, who indicated the Chairman of LAFCO, Mike Cale, has the following major concerns: The spot annexation issue is real and an attempt may be to use this particular annexation as an example to not allow spot annexations. 2. Mike Cale communicated his knowledge of Rohnert Park's process to update its General Plan and develop a more extensive service area, including the sphere of influence and specific plan areas. He is more inclined to suggest that any annexations be held off until the City completes its General Plan update process. The main concern seems to center on the piecemeal annexation approach as well as the use of the back twenty 20 acres of the School District site, which has not been identified by `a' specific development plan. Even if the School District attempted to annex just the school site alone with the elimination of the back twenty (20) acres, the spot annexation issue may become the stumbing block. In meeting with the School District, city staff has recommended the following options: 1. Proceed accordingly with the full site based on the following assumptions: (1) The total acreage is allowed under Measure N. (2) The school is an existing facility being serviced by the City of Rohnert Park. (3) The zoning designation is one unit per acre, which is the most restrictive zoning, and the General Plan designation is institutional. Therefore, any change on the back 20 acres must secure a General Plan Amendment from institutional use (4) Prepare a proposed development plan for the back 20 acres 2. Prepare a paper lot subdivision and request annexation of the school site only without the back 20 acres. 3. Pull the whole plan and wait for the General Plan process to be completed, which may secure a greater acceptance by the LAFCO Commissioners. LAFCO Executive Director Steve Sharpe's staff report should be received today or tomorrow. Steve indicates that he will not be making a direct recommendation, but will be requesting additional direction from the LAFCO Board. He is concerned about the overall policy of spot annexations and,.before proceeding with this annexation, he would like to receive greater direction from the LAFCO Board. Steve Sharpe is attempting to receive this policy direction before any actual action is taken on this particular annexation request. My direction from the City Council has been to work with the School District in an attempt to proceed with annexation of the entire site. I have met with School District representatives, the Executive Director of LAFCO, and am currently in the process of speaking with the Board of Supervisors and other representatives. Again, my role is basically providing information to the LAFCO members on the facts of the Creekside Annexation, Measure N, services being provided, etc; in an attempt to encourage their approval. If the City Council desires me to take an active role, please so indicate. Additional comments will be made at the City Council meeting. JDN:lr c: Wendie Schulenburg, Planning and Community Development Director Jan Heffron, Superintendent, Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified School District CCU^Cil Carresponla e'ce. l•vpyto ea.,' cuncl l^18is -r- _ i-Opy to .��:�i �%•. ;ropy to i 2 3 ;y � Copy to I I NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a public hearing will be conducted by the Sonoma Local Agency Formation Commission at 10 a.m. Thursday, November 6, 1997, in the County Administration Building, 575 Administration Drive, Room 102A, Santa Rosa, California, at which time all interested persons shall be given an opportunity to be heard on the following items. Copies of all documents relating to these projects are on file and may be reviewed in the LAFCO Office. 1. File 97-12: Rohnert Park Reorganization No. 13 (1997: Creekside Middle School) Involving Annexation to City of Rohnert Park, Detachment from Ranc o o e ire Service Area No. 41 (Multi -Services), and Amendment No. 3 to Rohnert Park Sphere of Influence. General Location: on the east side of Snyder Lane just south of Keiser Avenue in the northeast Rohnert -,,Park area. 66.8 acres. An Environmental Impact Report has been prepared.___----' 2. File 97-13: Geyserville Fire Protection District Reorganization No. 97-1 (Lake Sonoma) Involving Annexation to Geyserville Fire Protection District, Detachment from County Service Area No. 40 (Fire Services) and Amendment No. 1 to Geyserville Fire Protection District Sphere of Influence. General Location: vicinity of Lake Sonoma near Skaggs Springs Road and Kelly Road. 68,820 acres. A Negative Declaration has been prepared. NOTE: If you challenge the action of the Sonoma Local Agency Formation Commission on the environmental document or above -referenced proposal in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearings described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the Sonoma Local Agency Formation Commission, 575 Administration Drive, Room 104A, Santa Rosa, California, 95403, at, or prior to, the public hearing. October 16, 1997 Date Steven J. Sharpe, Assistant Executive Officer. .�. The 16th ANNUAL " HOLIDAY LIGHTS CELEBRAUON j Spoiso red by l City of lohnert Park Kohnert Park Chamber of Commerce Tuesday, December 9 5:30-6:30 P.Ni. Hosted by Exchange Bank 6290 Commerce Boulevard Featuring SANTA CLAUS COtORFu-- TRE_ LIGHTING DsPLAY HOLIDAY MUSIC i HOLIDAY, REFRESHMENTS N a Ughthg up Rohnert Park for the holidays is a 115-yearold community tradition treasured by aA of us, but cape c ally k:y our chi d.,en, We cre asking for your supoort to inscre that tM: trachion contirues. For Irtormahon on how you can help Ught Up Rohnert Park forthe Holidays, see the -everse side. Lighting Up Rohnert Park for the Holidays We need your support. After 15 years the od tree light Wands have finally given out, The City has dipped into its budget to pay for new Sight strands and for extensve repaS-s to the electriakll service -o the trees. 1- was very expenslve. This year the trees will look more beauliful than ever In their new lights, .here will be more lights on each tree along Rohnert Park Expressway between Con -men -e Boulevard and State Farm Drive. In future years we hope to Include even more trees in the holiday lighting display. We need your help to sI-pport this treasured community ioliday tradition. Please make a financial contribution to light Up Rohnert Park :or the Holidays. L� �•�ar I support tils convninity holiday tradition. Here h my conirlbutien. ❑$5 ❑S10 $20 1 want to be a Holiday Tral0lon Benefactor. Here s my contribution .cf S l0D (ar -nore) ❑ (Holiday Tnadtion Beneloelon wN be included on a ;pec.:al plaque on pubfrc display of Cify Hall.) Ctfi off this section c nd insert it with along wilts your contribution and your water bill payrne W. Mail or return to City of Rohneit Park. Checks or money orders orgy. No cosh, please. Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Counc1man Copy to/ Q Copy to Copy to The 16th ANNUAL HOLIDAY LIGHTS CELEBRATION 1 I Sponsored by City of Rohnert Park Rohnert Park Chamber of Commerce Tuesday, December 9 5:30-6:30 P.M. Hosted by Exchange Bank 6290 Commerce Boulevard Featuring SANTA CLAUS COLORFUL TREE LIGHTING DISPLAY HOLIDAY MUSIC i HOLIDAY REFRESHMENTS 1 r/ Lighting up Rohnert Park for the holidays is a 15 -year old community tradition treasured by all of us, but especially by our children. We are asking for your support to insure that this tradition continues. For information on how you can help Light Up Rohnert Park for the Holidays, see the reverse side. Lighting Up Rohnert Park . for the Holidays We need your support. After 15 years the old tree light strands have finally given out, The City has dipped into its budget to pay for new light strands and for extensive repairs to the electrical service to the trees, It was very expensive. This year the trees will look more beautiful than ever in their new lights. There will be more lights on each tree along Rohnert Park Expressway between Commerce Boulevard and State Farm Drive. In future years we hope to include even more trees in the holiday lighting display. We need your help to support this treasured community holiday tradition. Please make a financial contribution to Light Up Rohnert Park for the Holidays. -O%----------------- I support this -community holiday tradition. Here is my contribution. ❑ $5 ❑ $10 ❑ $20 1 want to be a Holiday Tradition Benefactor. Here is my contribution of $100 (or more) ❑ (Holiday Tradition Benefactors will be included on a special plaque on public display at City Hall.) Cut off this section and insert it with along with your contribution and your water bill payment. Mail or return to City of Rohnert Park. Checks or money orders only. No cash, please. FF 10-18-1996 8:1GPM FROM BLUEMACjAZZ' 707.564 2338 Subj: RPAS Web Site Date: 87-0-18.18:01:30 E DT From: mdelaney@wco.com (Mike Delaney) To: blumacjazz@aol:com (Joke MacKenzie) Jaka, P. 1 Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman 0'__..4,, /a -zz -t^J 0 ThanK you for your questbook comments at he Rohnart Pork Animal Shelter web site. They are very much appreciated. Asa coincidence, the RPAS web site is celebrating its Hist year:j►�,�,st. anniversary this month. it happeirs thiA you are the first "city father" to End and visit the site. In fact, you are the first "city father" to, even acKnoMedge Its existence. Some bacKground on the site... I W ^4 1!1 '0'vt I established the RPAS web site about u ye -di ago in response to a request from one of the Shelter assistants, Heather Canny. A former volunteer that works for my service provider, West Goast Online in Rutmesrt Park, mentioned to Heather that I had an animal web site of my own up, and I that I might be interested in doing an animal shelter site. HeaUmi contacted me, and the rest is history. I am proud of the fact that this web site was the first of its kind in Sonoma County, with biwee" updates to the pnotos of available pees fw adoption. This web site has directly resulted in the adoption of many previously unadoptable pets, and Indirectly resulted In the adoption of many more. I am proud of the fact that this web site has beery the inspiration for the spawning of 3 more similar sites, The Mumene Society of Sonoma County (hosted by the Press Democrat and sponsored by Hewlett Packard), the Heal burg Animal shelter, and Pets Lifeline In Sonoma. I currently provide the photos for the Humane Society site, which are done on the opposite Wednesdays that the RPAS photos are done. I am proud of the fact that l alone am the creator and maintainer of tras web site. Unfit the recent addition of the Safeway store in Pinson Valley as a provider of film and processing, I footed the gill for everything. The site is located on my account at WCO. I take the photos every two weeks, have them one hour processed by Safeway, take them home and scan them for inclusion on the web site, write the proliles for each animal, edit the web pages, and upload the updated into to the web site (usually about 11:00 PM). I will say that I am lucky to haw the help of volunteer DJ Jones with handling the dogs during the photo sessions. Without her help, some of the great dog photos wouldn't be possible. I do all this as a volunteer. I am an animal lover that feels that the unfortunate homeless pets of this world deserve every chance possible in Unding a wonderful and loving home. If I have conMbuted to the adoption of only one animal, then I will have luiblled my goal. The fact that l have been able to contribute to the adoption of many animals overwhelms me. The fact that the web site has been up and running for over a year and you are the tIr-st Rnhnert Paris official to -notice it bothers me. The lack of support from the Shelter employees, Including the director, and the City of Rohnert Park laavas me kind of tat. The city has the pedal �" � jar,; o i►.i�-���t, 10-18-1996 8:17PM FROM BLUEMACJAZZ 707 584 2338 vehicle to promote the adoption of animals and has done nothing to let the public know that it exists. The rrt should be b ' 9 p y bragging about thisIT web site and talking it up whenever they have the chance. God knows the shatter needs some help to atlevizate the ouercmwdinp that exists -there today. ti v This note has grown kind of long and I didn't mean it to be. If you have read We far, I thank you for your attention. Perhaps now that you know about the site you cauki take it a little further and let other council members know about it. Maybe with everyone's help we can Ind homes for a lot more of these poor animals. The Humane Society web site benefits from the Prove Democrat Ink and Hewlekt Packard sponsorship. We need same of that kind of help. Thanks for your time... P. 2 Mike Delaney, Yankee Services 't Santa Rosa, CSA httpJlwww.wco.com/—mdelaney . .4 Headers Reueiwd. 6urrr miin72.mail_aot.com (mrin72.mail.aol.corn (152163.116.110]) by airiTrnail.aol.com (,44) with SMTP; Sun, 19 Oct 199718:01:30 -0400 Received: rronr shell.wco.com (shell.wco.com (199.4.94.18]) by m6n72.mail.aol.com (8.8.5/8.8.5/AOL-4.0.0) h with £SMTP id SAA25868 for -;bluinacjazz@aol.wnv: ' Sun, 19 Oct 199718:01.28 -0400 (EDT) Received: from (20T.45,N,191] (z;erpaits191.vn:o.cutti (207.48.88.191}) ``` ,� .,..yf � by shell.wco.com (8.8.5/8.8.5A'VCO-18ju197) with SMTP id PAA03719 thr <blumacjazz@aol.com--; Sun, 19 Oct 1997 15:01.25.0700 (PDT) Messagead: <199710192201.PAA03719@shell.wco.com> Subject: RPAS Web Slte Date: Sun, 19 Oct 97 15:01:54 -0100 x -sender n-delaney@mail.wro.com . x -mater. Claris Ema)ler 2.OJ2, June 6, 1997 From: Mike Delaney <mdetaneyQDwco.corry To: *lake MacKenzie" <blumacjazzQwI.com;-, Mime -Version: 1.0 Content Type: texttplain; charset="US-ASCII" VIII. Report on the October 1, 1997 JEC Meeting and Input to the Executive Committee for the Next JEC Meeting - DISCUSSION/ACTION IX. Amendments to the SCTA/County Contract - DISCUSSION/INFORMATION X. Obligation of ISTEA Funds in Sonoma County - INFORMATION AND CONGRATULATIONS 160 % Q.b I �,? o 0 XI. Schedule Next Executive Committee Meeting - DISCUSSION/ACTION SCTA Start Sumnn Excc O WillardXII. Authority Member Comments - DISCUSSION tx[cvm[ D�wccrow cc Melinda B. Grosch XIII. Adjournment - ACTION Patricia Stoddard sccacrmw $of County Transportation Authority 2550 Ventura Avenue Santa Rose CA 95403 The next S C T A meeting will be held NOVEMBER 10, 1997 Phare: 527-1943 Fax: 527-1103 SONOMA COUNTY TRANSPORTATION AUTHORITY AGENDA -- - - October 20, 1997 3:15 p.m. /0 - 2Y-97 a c. Permit and Resource Management Department;-* 2550 Ventura Avenue Planning Commission Hearing Room " Santa Rosa, California Ike, Directors ITEM Paul Kelley, Chair 5owo"AC-- �' 7 I. Public Comment Sharon Wright; V. Chair Sw A ito[A 1799 11. Consent Item (Attachment) - ACTION SRT Mich" A. Minutes of September 8, 1997 Meeting $°mini crump scd°� k III. Reports - INFORMATION/ACTION Sandra Elias A. Update on NWP (Director Harberson) Yl ee, `�" B. MTC Report (Director Wright) JaTes HarbefO" covI C. SCTA Staff Report b txdS et (d we I 11.q) , S B45� U, v,, t Nee.c�s D. CAC Report (Bob Anderson, Chair) Robert John �,�,[�[ Chair E. TAC Report (Allan Tilton, ) to Ak David Keller F. Leg islativey�Update Arrb/rat S G e_3 l ops lr b y,,, �a e 5 S 'S'�� • Per.Aw,. /��� 6 G Y G L GO m �'tGe ; S �aCT Lo St'Our �' W or�L o v� 1(,p.� PLC,— (P,q,. ,. I ) Louis Rarnponi IV. Summary of SB 45 and Its Implications - INFORMATION s.msal"wtt V. Update on Progress with Sales Tax Initiative: Report of Polling Results - INFORMATION Linda Spiro . Rdw[wr Pnwrt VI. Petaluma to Novato Section of Highway 101 Issues - DISCUSSION/ACTION Le;ieYo Ca I�-rte s Eric Zledrich -6 t.w' j P "maa°"ae VII. Fact Sheet of Sonoma/Marin Projects and Costs - DISCUSSION/ACTION n o a�{; o ,x VIII. Report on the October 1, 1997 JEC Meeting and Input to the Executive Committee for the Next JEC Meeting - DISCUSSION/ACTION IX. Amendments to the SCTA/County Contract - DISCUSSION/INFORMATION X. Obligation of ISTEA Funds in Sonoma County - INFORMATION AND CONGRATULATIONS 160 % Q.b I �,? o 0 XI. Schedule Next Executive Committee Meeting - DISCUSSION/ACTION SCTA Start Sumnn Excc O WillardXII. Authority Member Comments - DISCUSSION tx[cvm[ D�wccrow cc Melinda B. Grosch XIII. Adjournment - ACTION Patricia Stoddard sccacrmw $of County Transportation Authority 2550 Ventura Avenue Santa Rose CA 95403 The next S C T A meeting will be held NOVEMBER 10, 1997 Phare: 527-1943 Fax: 527-1103 NORTH BAY DMSIOn p on.de 0 i 7 oz-/ %O F8 i e of California Cities OCTOBER 22, 1997 NOTICE TO ALL MEMBER CITIES OF THE NORTH BAY DIVISION OF LEAGUE OF CALIFORNIA CITIES This is to notify you of five (5) openings on the Executive Committee of the North Bay Division of the League of California Cities. Positions to be filled are as follows: Two (2) from the County of Marin Q�� �cc 'q, Two (2) from the County of Sonoma One (1) from the County of Napa (current representative to serve through Jan. 1998) Councilmembers interested in serving in these positions are urged to express their interest to their City Councils. The next Executive Committee meeting will be held in Rohnert Park on Saturday, November 8, 1997, at 9:00 a.m. at the Doubletree Hotel. The next General Meeting of the North Bay Division will be held in Napa on December 4, 1.997. Location will be announced at a later date. As the new President of the North Bay Division, I am looking forward to working with all the cities during the coming year and encourage your comments and input. Si cerely, Linda Spiro PLEASE DISTRIBUTE TO ALL CITY COUNCILMEMBERS. Representing Cities of Marin, Napa, Solano and Sonoma Counties i i '00V 1.0 ea. NORTH BAY i copy to /o• zr_ 97dC_ D'"S'O" League of California Cities DY 10 _ OCTOBER 22, 1997 NOTICE TO ALL MEMBER CITIES.OF THE NORTH BAY DIVISION OF LEAGUE OF CALIFORNIA CITIES . This is to notify you of five (5) openings on the Executive Committee of the North Bay Division of the League of California Cities. Positions to be filled are as follows: Two (2) from the County of Marin Two (2) from the County of Sonoma One (1) from the County of Napa (current representative to serve through Jan. 1998) Councilmembers interested in serving in these positions are urged to express their interest to their City Councils. The next Executive Committee meeting will be held in Rohnert Park on Saturday, November 8, 1997, at 9:00 a.m. at the Doubletree Hotel. The next General Meeting of the North Bay Division will be held in Napa on December 4, 1997. Location will be announced at a later date. As the new President of the North Bay Division, I am looking forward to working with all the cities during the coming -year, and encourage your comments and input. 5Si cerely, Linda Spiro PLEASE DISTRIBUTE TO ALL CITY COUNCILMEMBERS. Representing Cities of Marin, Napa, Solano and Sonoma. Counties 1Vevlsed Schedule: Please note time chane City of Rohnert Park Recreation Department Memorial Dedl.cation Ce'remony Saturday, November 17 19 9 7 Roberts Lake 5 0 10 Roberts'Lake Road. 11:00 a.m. Light refreshments served following the ceremony. The City of Rohnert .Park has established an area at Roberts Lake to memorialize loved ones who have passed away. The brick memorial was approved by the Rohnert Park City Council on March 25, 1997. The brick area consists of 1,450 bricks in an area which is approximately 20 feet. by 20 feet. The labor was donated by Dale and Gary Tatman of Dale's Property Service. CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Public Works Date: 10/24/97 To: Joseph N r, City Manager From: Bill SA Ablic Works Manager Subject: Information on City Council Agenda Items for 10/28/97 Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman Copy to Copy to copy to Here is some information on two minor items on the Council agenda for 10/28/97. Item 19.3 Brick Memorial Dedication - The centerpiece has been installed, and we are on schedule to install the bricks on Wednesday, 10/29/97 (the day after the Council meeting). I believe that Jim Pekkain has sent notices to the brick purchasers regarding this. Also, Jim told me that the dedication time on Saturday, 11/1/97 has been moved from noon to 11:00 a.m. There is currently a construction fence around the site to keep the ducks and geese out of the area while the hedges grow. Someone dropped off a group of five chickens in the area, but they are now down to three. Item 20.3 City Council/Staff mixer - I think that you know this, but, one of the date choices, Nov. 28-30, is Thanksgiving weekend. MEMORANDUM �— - - October 23, 1997 TO: Joseph Netter, City Manager FROM: Joseph Gaffney, City Enginee FILE: At -:Grade Railroad Crossings, roject No. 1995-7 The following is a synopsis of the current status of:the .proposed.improvements to the three at -grade railroad crossings in the city. I have applied for. PUC participation for the improvements, and I expect PUC funding, at 90% of the project's costs, in July of next year. The original project, to install rubberized grade crossings, was funded in the 1995-96 budget at $50,000. The initial estimates from the railroad contractors exceeded that amount. In addition, the railroad operators suggested that the City use pre -cast concrete .panels instead of the rubber panels, based on a longer service life and greater grade stability. The railroad operators also suggested that I upgrade the crossing hardware at the same time. The existing crossing arm controllers are more than 20 years old, and. are not as responsive as the newer, solid-state controllers. The inclusion of the crossing hardware will also make this project eligible for PUC participation. The PUC is currently accepting applications for next year's eligibility list. I made application for inclusion on the list in July, and I expect a response from PUC shortly. For your information, the current cost estimate is shown below. The City's obligation would be 10% of the total, or approximately $49,300. Crossing Hardware Surface Improvements Totals Grand Total .......................... Golf Course Dr. Rohnert.Park Expy. Southwest Blvd. $92,285.00 $118,500.00 $138,700.00 44,049.00 54,260.00 444970.00 $136,334.00 $172,760:00 $183,670.00 ................................................................................................... $492,764.00 Community Development Commission of the City of Rohnert Park Minutes October 14, 1997 The Members of the Community Development Commission of the City of Rohnert Park met this date immediately after the City Council meeting at approximately 11:27 p.m. in the City Offices, 6750 Commerce Boulevard, Rohnert Park, with Chairperson Spiro presiding. 1. CALL TO ORDER: Chairperson Linda Spiro called the Community Development Commission to order at approximately 11:27 p.m. ROLL CALL Present: (5) Commission Members Flores, Mackenzie, Reilly, Vidak-Martinez, and Chairperson Spiro_ Absent: (0) None Staff present for all or part of the meeting:, Executive Director/City Manager Netter, City Attorney Flitner, Assistant City Manager Leivo.and City Engineer Gaffney. 2. APPROVAL OF MINUTES: Upon motion by Commission Member Mackenzie, seconded by Commission Member Vidak-Martinez, with abstention by Commission Member Reilly due to absence from the meeting, minutes of September 23, 1997 were approved as submitted. 3. APPROVAL OF BILLS. Upon motion by Commission Member Reilly, seconded by Commission Member Vicki Vidak-Martinez, the bills presented per the attached list in the amount of $35,561.72 were unanimously approved.: 4. ACCEPTANCE OF CASHIINVESTMENTS REPORTS: Upon motion - by Commission -Member . Reilly, seconded by Commission Member Mackenzie, acceptance of the CashAnvestments Reports for Year End June 30, 1997 and for Month End, July 31, 1997 were unanimously approved as submitted. S. ACK. EXECDIRISECREPORT. • This report on posting of the agenda was acknowledged. 6. UNSCHEDULED PUBLIC APPEARANCES: Chairperson Linda Spiro stated that in compliance with State Law (The Brown Act), citizens wishing to make a comment may do so at this time. No one responded. 7. RESOLUTION FOR CONSIDERATION re Approval of Budget for Fiscal Year 1997-98 Due to the lateness of the hour, Executive. Director Netter advised this item could be deferred to the next meeting agenda. Commission agreed. 8. MATTERS FROM COMMISSION MEMBERS. Commission Member Mackenzie requested a staff report be provided on the above -referenced budget prior to consideration of the resolution at the next Commission meeting. Commission agreed. 9. ADJOURNMENT.- Chairperson Linda Spiro adjourned the meeting at approximately 11:30 p.m. Deputy Secretary ~ Chairperson jh/mnm:lo1497cd COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION CITY OF ROHNERT PARK BILLS FOR APPROVAL October 28, 1997 Hand Check Number 2423 $ 625.84 Dated October 20, 1997 SUB -TOTAL $ 625.84 ADDITIONAL BILLS FOR APPROVAL: Winzler & Kelly Project No. 199.1-4 $ 1,144.00 Baechtel Hudis, Inc. Project No. 1991-4 5,077.00 SUB -TOTAL $ 6,221.00 TOTAL $ 6,846.84 1 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION CITY OF ROHNERT PARK BILLS FOR APPROVAL October 28, 1997 Hand Check Number 2423 Dated October 20, 1997 $625.84 TOTAL $625.84 OB ID VALUE S3FA3401 CITY OF ROHNERT PARK CHECK # VENDOR #/NAME CHECK TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK INTER -OFFICE MEMORANDUM TO: The Chairman and Members of the Community FROM: Mich el L. Harrow Development Commission of the City of Rohnert Park Treasurer Executive Director Netter Director of Public Works Brust Asst. to the Exec. Dir. Leivo Agency Attorney Flitner Accountant/Auditor Raymond Accountant/Auditor Lipitz Accountant/Auditor Fogle DATE: October 17, 1997 CASH BALANCES AS OF AUGUST 31, 1997 , -improvement Project Fund , $0.00 Bond Proceeds Fund - 0.00 Cash From Property Tax Increment 20,501.1.9 Low & Moderate Income Housing Fund 1,618,106.77 Cash With Fiscal Agent -97% Loan Fund 267,007.50 Innovative Housing Rent Fund 5,241.51 Interest From Bond Proceeds 56,199.16 -Refundable Deposits -Innovative Housing Rents - 3,396.26 Interest From Increment " -32,945.09 Debt Service Fund (1991 TARB) .26-000.22 Debt Service Reserve Fund'(1991 TARB) 1,032,198:76 Lease Payment Fund (1991 RCOP) 1,038.26 TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION CASH . $3,062,634.72 CASH DISTRIBUTION AS OF AUGUST 31, 1997 Checking Accounts: Interest Rate ` :1.-.-achange'Bank Housing Rehabilitation Checking A\C Exchange Bank 1.11% 33,752.55 _Sulbtotal-Checking Accounts $52,897.83 Investment Accounts: CASH HELD BY FISCAL AGENTS: Investment Investment Maturity Interest Source of Investment Institution Type Date Rate Par Value Market Value Valuation Exchange Bank Passbook N/A 2.250% 141,000.00 141,000.00 Note (1) Providian National Bank Cert.of Dep. 3/18/98 6.130% 100,000.00 100,000.00 Note (1) Advanta Financial Bank Cert.of Dep. 6/10/98 6.350% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Advanta National Bank Cert.of Dep. 6/15/98 6.300% 100,000.00 100,000.00 Note (1) Advanta National Bank Cert.of Dep. 6/15/98 6.350% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Bank of the West Cert.of Dep. 08/06/98 6.000% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Summit S&L Cert.of Dep. 11/08/98 6.000% 99,000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Credit America Savings Cert.of Dep. 1:2113/99 6.750% 9000.00 99,000.00 Note (1) Fidelity Invmts-GMMP Mutual Fund N/A 5.300% 45,017.42 45,017.42 Note (1) State of Calif.-LAIF Pooled Invs. N/A 5.760% 788,606.95 788,606.95 Note (1) Sonoma Co Invsmt Pool Pooled Invs. N/A 5.494% 13,867.78 13,867.78 Note (1) 5.170% 0.00 0.00 Note (1) 1,683,492.15 1,683,492.15 1,683,492.15 CASH HELD BY FISCAL AGENTS: Investment Maturity Interest Investment Institution Type Date Rate Par Value Market Value Exchange Bk -97% Ln Fd Trust Acct. N/A 5.024% 267,007.50 267,007.50 Note (1) 267,007.50 First Trust -1991 TARB's: Interest Fund: Fidelity Money Fund Mutual Fund N/A 5.170% 25,997.75 25,997.75 Note (1) Tax Allocation Principal Fund: Fidelity Money Fund Mutual Fund N/A 5.170% 1.47 1.47 Note (1) Tax Allocation Refunding Reserve Fund: FNMA MIT Note 12/01/08 6.420% 992,812.50 946,100.00 Note (2) Fidelity Money Fund Mutual Fund N/A 5.170% 39,387.26 39,387.26 Note (1) Total 1991 TARB Reserve and Interest Fund 1,058,198.98 1,011,486.48 1,058,198.98 1994 Lease Payment Fund: `. Pacific Horizon Treasury Fund 5.170% 1,038.26 1,038.26 Note (1) COP Lease Payment Fund: Pacific Horizon Treasury Fund 5.170% 0.00 0.00 Note (1) Total 1991 C.O.P. Funded Interest 1,038.26 1,038.26 1,038.26 TOTAL COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION CASH Investment Yield for AUGUST 1997 5.76% $3,062,634.72 y ' COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISION __-__ OF THE.CITY_OF_ROHNERT.PARK__ __-_ ' IMPROVEMENT PROJECT FUND ....:.,.,aye.; ....�k:.. .. .. FISCAL YEAR 97/98 Summary of Revenue and Expeditures As of August 31, 1997 CURRENT ACTIVE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION PROJECTS: 0 Balance @ Current Fiscal Year Project No. and Description 30 -Jun -97 -Revenue Expenditures Balance @ 31 -Aug -97 1991-01 Commerce BI. Bikepath $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 1991-04 RPX /101 Overcrossing 0.00 0.00 0.00 0.00 Totals $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 $0.00 RP Expwy Widening 1990-02 R.P.J.H. Gym/Bldg 1990-05 PROJECTS SINCE INCEPTION OF COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION: Project No. and Description: 1980-04 Performing Arts Center 1984-21 Expressway Extension 1986-25 Seed Farm Drive Extension 1987-15 Roberts Lake Road 1988-15 Swim Center 1988-18 Public Safety Building 1988-23 Senior Center 1989-12 RP Expwy Widening 1990-02 R.P.J.H. Gym/Bldg 1990-05 A Park Lights 1990-14 Animal Shelter 1991-01 Commerce BI. Bikepath 1991-04 RPX/101Overcrossing 1992-01 SW Blvd Landscaping Closed Totals Est. Total Current Mo. Fiscal Year Expenditures Project Expenditures Expenditures Total Expenditures Closed Closed 7,343,365.73 7,343,366 Closed Closed 1,297,481.39 1,297,482 Closed Closed 30,867.66 30,868 Closed Closed '1;547,369.43 1,547,369 Closed Closed 144,688.38 144,689 Closed Closed 7,184,580.56 7,185,000 Closed Closed 851,620.35 851,621 Closed Closed. 308,383.61 308,384 Closed Closed 750,000.00 750,000 Closed Closed 93,897.69 93,898. Closed Closed 1,393,699.43 11393,700 0.00 0.00 120,476.95 161,000, 0.00 0.00 374,340.99375,000 Closed Closed 1.1,803.35 11,804 $0.00 $0.00 $21,452,575.52 _,$21,494,181 RESOLUTION NO. 97- 05" A RESOLUTION OF THE COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARR APPROVING A BUDGET FOR FISCAL YEAR 1997-98 BE IT RESOLVED, by the Community Development Commission of the City of Rohnert Park that certain budget submitted by the Executive Director, a copy of which is attached hereto and by reference made a part of this resolution, be and the same is hereby approved and adopted as the budget for the Community Development Commission of the City of Rohnert Park for the fiscal year 1997-98. DULY AND REGULARLY ADOPTED this day of ATTEST ----------------------- Secretary . 1997. COMMU-7 COMMISSION OF THA';; ..i` yr RUntvERT PARR ------------------ Chairman FLORES MACKENZIE REILLY VIDAK-MARTINEZ SPIRO AYES: NOES: ABSENT: ABSTAIN: _ Community Development Commission of the City of Rohnert Park 1997-98 Budget Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman Copy to io/Z The operating expenses in the Redevelopment Fund are as follows: Copy to 1. Copy to $1.0,000 Redevelopment Fund Tax Increment Revenues For 1997-98, budgeted tax increment revenues. have increased to $2,850,000. This is an increase of $15,000 over 1996-97 actual of $2,835,421. The assessed valuation for the redevelopment project area is not available until November. The amount actually received for 1997-98 will most likely be a little. higher than what is provided in this budget. Interest earnings are anticipated to be approximately $55,000. Operating Expenses/ Transfers The operating expenses in the Redevelopment Fund are as follows: 1. Trustee fees for the two bond issues $1.0,000 2. Property tax administration fee 47,200 3. Theater land lease payment to City 70,000 est payment to City for 3 loans from General Fund 314,560 5. Principal payments to City for 3 loans from General Fund 318,629 6. Debt payment on Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds 815,144 7. Debt payment on Refunding Certificates of Participation 576,528 8. Transfer to Housing Fund 810,000 The operating expenses listed above occur every fiscal year. The interest expense decrease as the CDC pays down the General Fund loans. As tax increment revenues increase, the transfer to the Housing Fund increases also. Housing Fund Transfer from Redevelopment Fund/Interest Earned The Redevelopment Fund, pursuant to State law, must transfer 20% of the gross tax increment (less certain adjustments) to the Housing Fund each year. -For 1997-98 the amount of the transfer is estimated to be $810,000. Interest earned from investments is budgeted at $90,000 and interest earned from loans in budgeted at $45,000. Operating Expenses/ Transfers The operating expenses in the Redevelopment Fund are as follows: 1. Dues and subscriptions $ 1,000 2. Travel & meetings 3,000 3. Trustee fees for Tax Allocation.Refunding Bonds (20%) 2,400 4. 20% of property tax administration fee 11,800 5. Administration -Earthquake Bracing program 23,000 6. Administration -MCC program 2,500 7. Grant -Petaluma People Services 46,500 7. Grant -Interfaith Shelter Network 5,000 8. Grant -Homeless Prevention Group 5,000 9. Grant -Catholic Charities 5,000 10. Administration-Owner/Rental rehab. program 150,000 11. Allocation of expenses from City General Fund 321,000 12. Unspecified new housing projects 500,000 13. Debt payment for Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds (20%) 203,294 The expenses listed above are all related to the CDC Housing program. The tax increment allocated to this fund must be spent on housing related programs within five years of their deposit into the fund. If the expenditures are not made in a timely manner, the unexpended funds must be turned over to the County Housing Authority and can be spent on housing projects anywhere in the County. The allocation of expenses from the City's General Fund has an entire page in the budget which provides the itemization for the $321,000 charge. Housing Loans The following new housing loans appear in the 1997-98 budget and will be repaid with interest: 1. Rancho Feliz security gate $ 64,700 2. Owner/rental rehab loan program 400,000 The unspecified housing project listed in the budget as an .expenditure could be a loan when it becomes identified. Outstanding Debt The outstanding debt ($23,116,895) of the CDC.as of 6/30/97 is as follows: 1. Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds $11,619,895 Maturity date is 2020 2. Refunding Certificates of Participation 7,565,000 Maturity date is 2017 3. General fund loans 3,932,000 Maturity date is 2008 It should be noted that a redevelopment agency must be in debt in order to receive tax increment revenues. Projects There are no estimated project expenditures as the bond proceeds from the. tax. allocation bonds are all expended." COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK 1997-98 BUDGET Red"velopment Housing ANTICIPATED REVENUES Fund Fund Property tax increment $2,850,000 $0 Interest from investments 55,000 90,000 Interest from loan repayments 0 45,000 Total Revenues ----------- $2,905,000 ----------- $135,000 ANTICIPATED EXPENDITURES Dues & Subscriptions 0 1,000 Travel & Meetings 0 3,000 Contractual Services: Trustee.fees/bond issues _ 10,000 2,400 County of Sonoma/Property tax admin fee 47,200 11,800 Earthquake bracing program administration 0 .23,000 MCC Program Administration 0 2,500 Petaluma People Services 0 46,500 Interfaith Shelter Network 0 5,000 Homeless Prevention Group 0 5,000 Catholic Charities 0 5,000 Payment to City- theatre land lease 70,000 0 Payment to City- theatre loan #1 interest 264,000 0 Payment to City- theatre loan #2 interest 23,200 0 Payment to City- theatre. -loan #3 interest 27,360 0 Payment to City- theatre loan #1 principal 218,629 0 Payment to City- theatre loan #2 principal 50,000 0 Payment to City- theatre loan #3 principal 50,000 0 Owner/Rental Rehab Program administration 0 150,000 Unspecified new housing projects 0 500,000 Allocation of expenses from City general fund 0 .321,000 Total Operating Expenditures 760,389 1,076,200 EXCESS OF REVENUES OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES 2,144,611 (941,200) OTHER FINANCING SOURCES (USES): Capital Project Expenditures -(see attached) 0 0 Operating Transfers In '(Out)- (20% set-aside) -(810,000) 810,000 Operating Transfers Out J For 1991 TARt3 (815,144) (203,294) Operating Transfers Out For 1994 RCOP (576,528) 0 Total Other Financing Sources (Uses) (2,201,672) 606,706 98CDABUD.XLS EXCESS OF REVENUES AND OTHER FINANCING ----------- ----------- SOURCES OVER (UNDER) EXPENDITURES OTHER FINANCING USES (57,061) (334,494) FUND BALANCE, JULY 1, 1997 (3,699,97.6) 4. -903,189 FUND BALANCE, JUNE 30, 1998, Est. ----------- ($3,757,037) ----------- ----------- ----------- $4,568,695 ----------- ----------- 98CDABUD.XLS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARR 1997-98 CASH FLOW STATEMENT 98CASHFL.XLS Redevelopment Low & Moderate Fund Housing Fund Cash Balance, July 1, 1997 Low & Moderate Income Housing Fund $0 $1,724,407 (1) Improvement Project Fund 0 0 Bond Proceeds Fund 0 0 Interest earned cash 57,061 0 Cash from tax increment 563,072 (1) 0 ANTICIPATED SOURCES OF CASH Property Tax Increment 2,850,000 0 Housing set-aside (810,000) 810,000 Interest from investments 55,000 90,000 Interest from loan repayments 0 45,000 Rehab loan payoffs 0 20,000 Rehab principal p°-'- 0 20,000 Total Anticipated Sources of Cash $2,715,133 $2,709,407 ANTICIPATED USES OF CASH Dues & Subscriptions $0 $1,000 Travel & Meetings 0 3,000 Contractual services: Trustee fees/bond issues 10,000 2,400 County property tax admin fee 47,200 11,800 Mobile Home Earthquake Bracing grants 0 50,000 Admin for Earthquake Bracing Program 0 23,000 MCC program administration 0 2,500 Petaluma People services 0 .46,500 Interfaith Shelter Network grant 0 5,000 Homeless Prevention Group grant 0 5,000 Catholic Charities 0 5,000 Administration fee -City general fund 0 321,000 Fund Rancho Feliz Loan - 0 -64,700 (4) Unspecified.New Affordable Housing Projects. 0 500,000 (3) Owner/Rental Rehab Loan Program 0 400,000 (3) Administration of Owner/Rental Rehab Program 0 -.150, 000 (3) GF loan interest payments 314,560 0 Theatre land lease payment 70,000 0 Capital project expenditures (see attached) 0 0 98CASHFL.XLS Debt service pmts/1991 TARBS Debt service pmts/1994 RCOPS Payment to City/Loan Repayments Total Anticipated Uses of Cash Cash Balance, June 30, 1998, Estimated 815,144 576,528 318,629 $2,152,061 $563,072 (2) 203,294 0 0 $1,794,194 $915,213 (2) (1)$695,090 is needed for the 8/97 debt service payment for the 1991 TA Refunding Bonds ($556,072 from Redevelopment Fund & $139,018 from Housing Fund) (2)$703,840 is needed for the 8/98 debt service payment for the 1991 TA Refunding Bonds. ($563,072 from Redevelopment Fund & $140,768 from Housing Fund) (3)Possible projects/proposals will be presented to the Board at a later date (4)Capital improvement loans COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION Sub -total General Gov't. $302,530 Public Works: Engineering Public Works - General Total 370,180 1,973,165 ** Rounded amt used in 1997-98 budget= 98CDA-RE.XLS 5% 18,509 0% 0 $321,039 ** $321,000 OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK 1997-98 Budget COMPUTATION OF GENERAL FUND ALLOCATION TO CDC LOW & MOD fUND Estimated % Applied 1997-98 to CDC L & M Budget Operations Amount General Government: ---------- ---------- ---------- City Council $52,740 10% $5,274 City Manager 460,750 15% 69,113 Finance & Accounting 841,210 10% 84,121 Information Systems 197,085 5% 9,854 Stores 73,595 0% 0 Legal Services 62,335 15% 9,350 Planning 264,725 5% 13,236 Personnel 230,815 5% 11,541 Internal Audit 86,620 0% 0 City Offices Building 44,000 5% 2,200 City Offices Annex 29,500 10% 2,950 Non -Departmental 1,355,585 7% 94,891 Sub -total General Gov't. $302,530 Public Works: Engineering Public Works - General Total 370,180 1,973,165 ** Rounded amt used in 1997-98 budget= 98CDA-RE.XLS 5% 18,509 0% 0 $321,039 ** $321,000 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK Balance Sheet June 30, 1997 Fund Equity: Undesignated fund balance (deficit) (3,699,976) 0 Designated for Low & Mod Housing 0 4,903,189 Total Fund Equity .(3,699,976) 4,903,189 ------------ Total Liabilities and Fund Equity $728,350 $5,000,395 (1) Loans from City general fund (Performing Arts Center contruction) Loan #1, balance 6/30/97 $3,300,000 Loan #2, balance 6/30/97 290,000 Loan #3, balance 6/30/97 342,000 Total loans due City general fund as of 6/30/97 $3,932,000 98BALST.XLS -- Redevelopment Housing Assets Cash and Investments: Improvement project fund $0 $0 Low & moderate income housing fund 0 1,724,407 Bond proceeds -1988 tax alloc. bonds 0 0 Cash from interest earned 57,061 0 Cash from Tax Increment 563,072 0 Refundable deposits 0 3,396 Innovative Housing rents 0 5,242 Cash with Fiscal Agent 0 264,759 Total Cash and Investments 620,133 1,997,804 Accounts receivable 0 0 Interest receivable 32,010 20,987 Taxes receivable 76,207 0 Loans receivable/Rehab 0 802,233 Note receivable/Ind. Living Skills 0 16,450 Note receivable/Burbank Housing (Tower Apts) 0 390,000 Note receivable/NEH Homeowner Assist. 0 64,614 Loan receivable/Innovative Housing 0 286,338 Note receivable/Burbank Housing (Garden Apts) 0 260:^^n 1st Tim& ,Hua ebuyer Program 0 123; 13 Northbay Rehab/Note Receivable 0 200,519 Due from CDA General Fund (Due 5/2003) 0 455,862 Due from RP Housing Financing Authority 0 382,450 Total Assets $728,350 $5,000,395 Liabilities and Fund Equity Liabilities: Accounts Payable $40,464 $27,026 Deferred Revenue 0 66,784 Refundable deposits 0 3,396 Due to City general fund 0 0 Due to Low & Mod. Income Housing Fund 455,862 0 (1) Loan from City general fund 31-932,000 0 Total Liabilities 4,428,326 97,206 Fund Equity: Undesignated fund balance (deficit) (3,699,976) 0 Designated for Low & Mod Housing 0 4,903,189 Total Fund Equity .(3,699,976) 4,903,189 ------------ Total Liabilities and Fund Equity $728,350 $5,000,395 (1) Loans from City general fund (Performing Arts Center contruction) Loan #1, balance 6/30/97 $3,300,000 Loan #2, balance 6/30/97 290,000 Loan #3, balance 6/30/97 342,000 Total loans due City general fund as of 6/30/97 $3,932,000 98BALST.XLS -- COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARR Statement of Long Term Debt Outstanding June 30, 1997 Outstanding Long Term Debt: 1991 Tax Allocation Refunding Bonds $11,619,895 1994 Refunding Certificates of Participation 7,565,000 ------------ Total Long Term Debt as of June 30, 1997 $19,184,895 Other Indebtedness: Loans from City general fund $3,932,000 COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION OF THE CITY OF ROHNERT PARK REDEVELOPMENT FUND 1997-98 . BUDGET Estimated Project Expenditures: No Projects Total Project Expenditures 98PROJ.XLS $0 $0 COUNCIL COMMUNICATIONS OCTOBER 28, 1997 1. CA CAUCUS for Cities & Schools 2. US Conference of Mayors 3. City of Covina 4. R Stutrud/Resident 5. So. Co. Community Development Com. 6. Governor Pete Wilson 7. P. & S. Shafer 8. So. Co. Water Agency 9. Cotati/RP Unified School District 10. PG&E 11. North Bay Assn. of REALTORS 12. US Conference of Mayors 13. City of Coalinga 14. Legislative Bulletin 15. K. Johnson/Resident 16. P. Stutrud/Resident 17. A. Learned/FACE to FACE 18. SCTA 19. CA Healthy Cities Project 20. U.S. Conference of Mayors Sales Tax Initiative Recycling Summit, Wed. 11/12-14/97, KY Sales Tax Redistribution Initiative Brown Act & Economic Summit Mobile Home Earthquake Resistant Bracing Assembly Bill 1362 - Opposed Skate Park September Report -Toilet Replacement Program Building Bridges Meeting, Wed. 10/29/97 3:30-5 pm, Dept. Public Safety 3rd Quarter Outage -Report Possible Solution to "Pig Farm" Urban Water Council Procurement Processes & RFP Development, Tues. 12/2/97 10 am4 pm Unique Idea for Youth Action on Bills of City Interest Suggested Improvements for Rohnert Park Brown Act & Economic Summit/GP Guidelines Thank you for Donation Agenda for Thursday, 10/23/97 Mtg. @ 1:30 pm Community Compass America Recycles Day: see AGENDA Res. 97-188 21. Mobilehome Rent Appeals Board Fact Sheets. See AGENDA Item #10 Lorna Blanc Onna S. Rayos 22. R. Heroux/Health Care Services 23. Varnum, Riddering, Schmidt & Howlett 24. Association of Bay Area Governments 25. Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital 26. Mayors' & Councilmembers' 27. Miho Kite 28. C. Abbott Merchant Education Results -Santa Barbara County Federal Preemption of Local Zoning ABAG Elections Focus Group Results Working Group ,_T hors., October _1997 @ 7 pm Letters of Condolence re: Julie Yonemura (Included in Agenda Packet) Skate Park letter (Included -in Agenda Packet) dated 10/24/97 29. D. Tomkins/Housing Specialist 1998 Annual General Adjustment & Registration Fees for Mobilehome Parks 30. N. Gist/US Dept.Justice 31. City of Cotati 32. LAFCO 1997 Law Enforcement Block Grants Notice of Public Hearing Wednesday November 5, 1997 @ 7 pm Meeting Thursday, 11/6/97 10 am COUNCIL, COMMUNICATIONS OCTOBER 28, 1997 1. CA CAUCUS for Cities & Schools 2. US Conference of Mayors 3. City of Covina 4. P. Stutrud/Resident 5. So.Co. Community Development Com. 6. Governor Pete Wilson 7. P. & S. Shafer 8. So. Co. Water Agency 9. Cotati/RP Unified School District 10. PG&E 11. North Bay Assn. of REALTORS 12. US Conference of Mayors 13. City of Coalinga 14. Legislative Bulletin 15. K. Johnson/Resident 16. P. Stutrud/Resident Sales Tax Initiative Recycling Summit, Wed. 11/12-14/97, KY Sales Tax Redistribution Initiative Brown Act & Economic Summit Mobile Home Earthquake Resistant Bracing Assembly Bill 1362 - Opposed Skate Park September Report -Toilet Replacement Program Building Bridges Meeting, Wed. 10/29/97 3:30-5 pm, Dept. Public Safety 3rd Quarter Outage Report Possible Solution to "Pig Farm" Urban Water Council Procurement Processes & RFP Development, Tues. 12/2/97 10 am -4 pm Unique Idea for Youth Action on Bills of City Interest Suggested Improvements for Rohnert Park Brown Act & Economic Surmnit/GP Guidelines 17. A. Learned/FACE to FACE Thank you for Donation 18. SCTA Agenda for Thursday, 10/23/97 Mtg. @ 1:30 pm 19. CA Healthy Cities Project Community Compass 20. U.S. Conference of Mayors America Recycles Day: see AGENDA Res. 97-188 21. Mobilehome Rent Appeals Board Fact Sheets. See AGENDA Item #10 Lorna Blanc Onna S. Rayos dated 10/23/97 22. R. Heroux/Health Care Services Merchant Education Results -Santa Barbara County 23. Varnum, Riddering, Schmidt & Howlett Federal Preemption of Local Zoning 24. Association of Bay Area Governments ABAG Elections 25. Santa Rosa Memorial Hospital Focus Group Results 26. Mayors' & Councilmembers' Working Group, Thurs., October 23, 1997 @ 7 pm Name: Rohnert Park A . ... .. L Ail T3 From: CALIFORNIA CAUCUS Gate: 10/10/97 • California CAUCUS for Cities and Schools 912 N. Prospero Ot., Covina, U51 91722 1'e1.(626)915 -W4 e FAX (6261 967-5606 OCTOBER 8, 1997 Council Correspondence TO: CITY MANAGERS OF CITIES SUPPORTING Copy to ea. Councilmen SALES TAX REDISTRIBUTION LEGISLATION Copy Copy to FROM: CARY KALSCHEUER, PRESIDENT Copy to CALIFORNIA CAUCUS FOR CITIES AND SCHOOLS SUBJECT: UPDATE ON SALES TAX INITIATIVE PAGES The CAUCUS has sent letters to over 300 local employee associations statewide urging them to support this initiative. Many are contacting their state affiliate organizations like Service Employees International Union (SEIU), American Federated State and Municipal Employees (AFSME), Peace Officer Research Association of California (PORAL), California Professional Firefighters (CPF), and California State Firefighters Association (CSFA). These groups have the capacity to finance the signature gathering costs to qualify this initiative. 700,000 signatures must be gathered by the end of Februan, 1998 to qualify this initiative for the November 1998 General Election. We have a proposal fi-om Progressive Campaigns, hic. to accomplish this task for a cost of 5770,000. We forwarded a copy of this proposal to each of the above organizations (SEIU's will be mailed this week) along with a copy of the initiative, the official title and summary from the Attorney General's Office and a copy of the analysis from the Department of Finance and Legislative Analyst's Office. It will be impossible to qualify this initiative without the involvement of labor. All local employee associations affiliated with any of the above groups need to contact these state or county associations immediately and urge their financial support. If you would like us to contact your employee associations directly on this matter, please forward us your employee association list if you have not already done so. You may FAX us a list at (62 6) 967-5606. 'Name. Rohnert Park From: CALIFORNIA CAUCUS Date: 10/10197 ii STATE ACND COUNTY EMPLOYEE ASSOCIATIONS CONTACTED BY THE CAUCUS Mr. Tcrry Brcnnand, Lcgislativc Advocatc 5F.i1 J 1007 7h Street, 4's floor Sacramento. CA 95814 Tel. (916) 442-3838/FAX (916) 442-0976 Mr. Willie Pelote, Political and i.egislative Director AFSN /E 1121 L Street, Suite 904 Sacramento. CA 95814 Tel. (916) 441-1570/FAX (916) 441-5426 Xfi-. Brian Hatch, Director of Gavertunent Affairs California Professional Firefighters 1780 Creekside Oaks Dr., Ste 200 Sacramento, C!1 95833 Tcl. (916) 921-9111iFAX (916) 921-1106 Mr. Wally Hurst, Asst. General Mstr./LCgislaiive Advocate California State Firefighters Association 2701 K Street, Suite 201 Sacramento, CA 95816 Tel. (800) 451-2732,TAX (916) 4-16-9889 Mr. Steve Craig, President Mr. John Dineen, General Manager PORAL 1911 F Street Sacramento, CA 95814 Tel. (800) 937-6722/F:4—X (916) 448-2749 Mr. Chris Prato, General Manaeer San Bcmardino County Employccs Association 433 N. Sierra Way San Bernardino, CA 92402 Tel. (909) 889-8377FAX (909) 888-7429 Mr. John Sawyer, General Manager Grange County Employees ?association 830 N. Ross St. Santa Ana, CA 92701 Tel. -(714) 835-3355/FAX (714) 835-7654 I 7I �1 * 5� PtmlOent: PAUL HELMKE .Mavor of Fort Wayne Vice Presides DEEDEE CORRADINI .A(avor a Salt Lake Ciry Ptmt Peealdmb: JERRY E. ABRAMSON Mayor of Louisville VICTOR ASHE Mayor of Knoxville RICIIARD M DALEY Mavor of Chicago NORMAN B. RICE Mayor of Snttk JOSEPH P. RILEY. JR. Mayor of Charleston. SC Treatem DENNIS W. ARCHER .Mayor of Detroit CHARLES E. BOX Mayor of Rockford H. SILENT COLES Mayor of Sone NANCY M. GRAHAM Mawr of West Palm Beach SHARPE)AMES Mavor of Newark. NJ MIKE JOHANNS Mawr of Lincoln PATRICK). MCMANUS .Mavor of Lvnn MARC H. MORTAL Mayor of New Orleans RITA L. MULLINS Mawr of Palatine MEYERA E. OBERNDORF "- Mawr of Virginia Beach JAMES P. PERRON Mawr of Elkhart ELIZABETH D RHEA Mayor of Rock Hill DAVID W SMITH Mavor of Newark. CA MICHAEL R. WHITE Mawr of Cleveland Adirtmory Bo..a: WELLINGTON E. WEBB. Chair .Mavor of Denver SHARON SAYLES BELTON .Mawr of Minnnpohs J. CHRISTIAN BOLLWAGF. Mawr of Elizabeth WILLIE L. BROWN. JR. .Mawr of San Francisco MARTIN CHAV EZ Mavor of Albuquerque LEE R CLA.NCEY Mavor of Cellar Rapids CARDELL COOPER >lavor of East Orange ELLEN M CORBETT .Mavor of San Leandro BRIAN EBERSOLE Mavor of Tacoma JOSEPH P GA.NIM Mavor or Bridgeport _LtMESA GARNER .Mavor of Hempstead SUSAN GOLDING Mavor Of San Diego JEFF GRIFFIN Mavor of Reno MICHAEL A GUIDO Mavor of Dearborn PATRICK HENRY HAYS Mavorof North Utile Rock JANLAVERTY IONES Mawr of I- Vegas SCOTT L KING Mawr of G_ RONALD KIRK Mavor of Dallas JIM MARSHALL Mawr of Macon GARY D. M, CALEB Mavor of Abilene JOH N. R. Mc. CARTHY Mavor of Everett THOMAS At MENINO Mavoror Boston DAVID W MOORE 'favor of Beaumont ARLEN'EJ Mt LDER Mavor of .Arlington Heights DOUGLAS PALMER Mavor of rrenton DONALDL PI_I: SQCELLIC Mavor of .Akron EDWARD RF.NDF.LL Maser of Phdadclphu M SUSAN SAVAGE Mavorof ruisa KURT L SCIIMOKE Mavor of Balumore MARTHA S WOOD Mavor of Winston-Salem Ex.D4eetEt': I THOMAS COCHRAN � EMM - UNITED STATES CONFERENCE OF MAYORS October 9, 1997 Dear Mayor: 1620 EYE STREET. NORTHWEST WASHINGTON. D.C. 20006 TELEPHONE (202) 293-7330 FAX (202) 293.2352 TDD (202) 293-9445' URL: wcAw.usmavors.org,uscm Council Correspovd,3nce Copy to ea. Councilman Copy to �o _ _ 9,7 Xc Copy to cwy to On behalf of the United States of Mayors' Municipal Waste Management Association, it is our pleasure to invite you to participate in the annual Fall Recycling Summit, to be held in Louisville, KY on November 12 - 14, 1997. The Fall Summit is an opportunity for solid waste management policy makers from across the nation to discuss the solid waste management challenges facing America's urban areas in a in a unique interactive manner. The MWMA Committees will meet on Thursday morning, November 13, followed by a session with our Solid Waste Advisory Council entitled "Working Toward Sustainable Recycling". On Friday, we will convene the "public sector only" urban round table for a discussion of "Best Practices" in developing innovative and cost efficient solid waste management programs. A tour of a unique C&D recycling facility is available on Wednesday afternoon. In past years, our Fall Summit has seen participation from over 50 cities, including New York, Phoenix, Chicago, Houston, San Diego, Fort Wayne, Tampa -and Portland. We hope you, or the director responsible for solid waste management in your city, will be able to join us for our 1997 Summit to share information about your city's programs. Please call David Gatton or Michael Gagliardo. of the USCM/MWMA'staff (202-293-7330) if you have any questions. The agenda and registration materials are attached for your .use. We look forward to seeing you in Louisville. Sincerely, Rosemary Corbin Mayor of Richmond Co-chair, Recycling Task Force Attachments Sharpe James Mayor of Newark Co-chair, Recycling Task Force THE MUNICIPAL WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION AGENDA FALL SOLID WASTE SUMMIT SEELBACH HOTEL, LOU/SV/LLE, KY NOVEMBER 12 - 14, 1997 WEDNESDA Y. NOVEMBER 12. 199 7 10:00 am - 5:00 pm Registration 12:00 pm - 5:00 pm Tour of Mother Earth Recycling Facility - a unique underground construction and demolition debris recycling facility ♦ Tour includes lunch and sightseeing during travel to and from the facility ♦ Bus will depart promptly at noon;. meet in the hotel Jobb y 6:30 pm - 7:30 pm Opening Reception at the Seelbach Hotel THURSDAY.• u: .. 8.00AM Registration 8:00 am - 9:00 am Continental Breakfast in Exhibit Area 9:00 am - 12:00 pm Recycling Committee Meeting Waste -to -Energy Committee Meeting Environmental Committee Meeting 12:00 pm - 1:30 pm Luncheon Address by The Honorable Jerry E. Abramson ,Mayor of Louisville .. l ,: �a r..\r.rr., r ,,. .., .r�. ,n Il,rr�.r, rr,_.' h.:, .1nr.r..\,.,�rr•/. IL, iinr n /r! _.. , _. _. _ � - � l ! \ _. _� I_„r-x'11_ MWMA Fall Summit November 12 - 14, 1997 Louisville, KY Page 2 1:30 pm - 5:00 pm 7:00 pm - 10:00 pm Solid Waste Advisory Council Forums: Working Toward Sustainable Recycling ♦ Forum l: 'Taking the Risk Out of Recycling'- Public and Private Risk Allocation ♦ Forum H. 'Close the Loop"- Building and Expanding Buy - Recycled' Efforts Reception and Dinner at the Louisville Slugger Museum ♦ Bus will depart promptly at 7:00 pm; meet in the hotel lobby 7:30 am - 8:30 am Continental Breakfast in Exhibit Area 8:30 am - 12:00 pm Urban Summit - PUBLIC SECTOR ONLY Best Practices in Developing, Implementing and Managing Innovative and Cost -Effective Solid Waste Management Programs 12:00 pm - 6:00 pm Churchill Downs - ALL PARTICIPANTS INVITED ♦ Includes lunch, racing and tour of Churchill Downs Museum ♦ Bus will depart promptly at noon; meet in the hotel lobby 8:00 AM - 9:00 AM Continental Breakfast 9:00 am - 11:30 am MWMA Executive Committee and Advisory Board Meeting - INVITATION ONLY l: I DOCUMEN71 MICHAEL I MWMA I FALSUM97.003 MUNICIPAL WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION FALL SOLID WASTE SUMMIT . SEELBACH HOTEL, LOUISVILLE, KY NOVEMBER 12 - 14, 1997 NAME: TITLE: ORGANIZA TION: ADDRESS: TELEPHONE. • FAX. • E-MAIL: REGISTRA TION FEE.• $150.00 (PAYABLE TO USCM/MWMA) ✓INCLUDES: CONFERENCE MATERIALS, FACILITY TOUR, AND. CONFERENCE MEALS, BREAKS AND RECEPTIONS ✓REGISTRATION FEES NOT REFUNDABLE AFTER OCTOBER 28, 1992 I WILL BE A TTENDING THE FOLL D WING EVENTS: O TOUR OF MOTHER EARTH RECYCLING FACILITY -WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 - NOON TO 5:00 PM OPENING RECEPTION- WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12 - 6:30 TO 7:30 PM RECYCLING COMMITTEE MEETING - THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13 - 9:00 AM TO NOON ® WASTE -TD -ENERGY COMMITTEE MEETING - THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13 - 9:00 AM TO NOON ® ENVIRONMENTAL COMMITTEE MEETING -THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13 - 9:00 AM TO NOON O RECEPTION/DINNER AT LOUISVILLE SLUGGER MUSEUM- THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 13 - 7: 00 PM TO 10:00 PM O LUNCHEON/RACING/TO UR A T CHURCHIL L DOWNS- FRIDAY, NOVEMBER 14- NOON TO 6: 00 PM "BEST PRACTICES " DESCRIPTION: O ATTACHED O WILL BE SENT BY REGISTRA TION FORM MWMA FALL SUMMIT LOUISVILLE, KY NOVEMBER 12 - 14, 1997 PAGE 2 HOTEL A CCOMMODA TIONS: A BLOCK OF ROOMS HAS BEEN RESERVED AT THE SEELBACH HOTEL, 500 FOURTH A VENUE, LOUISVILLE, KY 40202, A T THE SPECIAL GROUP RA TE OF $89 PER NIGHT (SINGLE OR DOUBLE OCCUPANCY) AND $110 PER NIGHT. (SINGLE OR DOUBLE CONCIERGE OCCUPANCY) (PLUS IZ36% CITY, STA TE AND HOTEL TAX). RESERVATIONS MUST BE MADE DIRECTLY. WITH THE HOTEL (1-800-333-3399 OR 502-585-3200) BY OCTOBER 11, 1997 TO BEASSURED OF THIS RATE. WHEN MAKING RESERVATIONS, BE SURE TO SPECIFY THAT YOU ARE ATTENDING THE USCM/MWMA FALL SUMMIT. THF MUNICIPAL WASTE MANAGEMENT ASSOCIATION CIO THE U.S. CONFERENCE OF MAYORS 1620 EYE STREET, NW WASHINGTON, D.C. 20006 202-861- 6782 202-429-0422 - FAX ATTN: JILLIAN McNA MRA L• -I DOCUMENT I MICHAEL I MWMA I FAL SUM97.002 10/10/1997 00:35 818-858-5556 C-11 T Y ENV. SVCS. PAGE 01/07 FAX TRANSMISSION ONLY. PAGES SENT 7 O F C OVI NA 125 East College Street a Covina, California 91723-2199 OCTOBER 9, 1997 Council Correspondence YOUR SUPPORT NEEDED! Copy to ea. Councilman Copyto /a-1p_Qj�c TO: CITY WAANAGERS OF CT1<'IES SUPPORTING SALES T py to RMI I A Copy to FROM: V1P19flUPVff0N, MAYOR PRO -TEM SUBJECT: SALES TAX REDISTRIBUTION INITIATIVE On October 7, 1997, the Covina City Council voted unanimously to support a ballot initiative introduced by the California CAUCUS for Cities and Schools. This initiative has taken the essence of our Legislation, SB 1310 introduced by Senator Ross Johnson (R) Irvine, and developed it into a Constitutional initiative. The initiative explained in the attached correspondence from the State Legislative Analyst, and Department of Finance, would return, after the fifth year of the phase-in, an estimated $4 Billion, (5103 per capita by current estimates), amorally to local government. This initiative contains built-in Constitutional protection against State raids on our major revenue sources and Constitutionally protects the Bradley Burns Sales Tax provisions currently in place. The initiative would enable cities and counties to put before the voters the decision on whether local government should get a larger share of existing sales taxes to maintain critical local services. The initiative also protects revenues currently directed by the State for Education. Over 300 Cities and County jurisdictions supported SB 1310 and it's predecessor SB 1977 in our leffbrts to resolve the local government funding crisis. WE URGE YOU TO PLEASE CONTINUE YOUR SUPPORT BY ADOPTING RESOLUTIONS . ANIS ENCOURAGING SUPPORT FOR TIES EFFORT1 Please send your supporting resolutions as soon as possible! All correspondence can be TRANSMITTED VIA FAX TO. CAUCUS (626) 967-5606. Or by mail to CAUCUS, P.O. BOX 4730, COVI NA, CA 917'23. Contact can also be made by e-mail at CAUCLJSI@aol.com. If you have any questions please contact the California Caucus for*Cities and Scliools -at (626) 915-3834. 10/10/1997 00:35 818-858-5556 ENV. SVCS. PAGE 02/07 Date: September 30, 1907 File No.: SA 97 RF 0024 The Attorney General of California has prepared the following title and summary of the chief purpose and points of the proposed measure: SALES AND USE TAXES. REALLOCATION. INITIATIVE CONSTITUTIONAL AMENDMENT. Provides that local governments may, with voter approval, impose up to a 1 sales and use tax over a five-year period, and reduce the State tax by a corresponding percentage. Distributes the revenue on a per capita basis to local governments imposing the tax. Provides that reduction in State revenue shall not diminish the State's obligation to fund public education. Prohibits the State from changing existing allocations or responsibilities of local governments to offset reduction in General Fund. Summary of estimate by Legislative Analyst and Director of Finance of the fiscal impact on state and local governments: This measure would result in state revenue losses and comparable revenue gains to local government of up to $4 billion annually in five years. It would also result in significant reduction in state fiscal flexibility. a 10/10/1997 00:35 CIIAIR MIKE THOMPSON SENATE MAIJRIC6 K. )OHANNI;SSEN PATRICK JOHNSTON nM LESLIE JACK O'CONNFLI. RICHARD G. POLANCO JOHN VASCONCELLOS CATHIE WR10H'r 818-858-5556 ENV. SVCS. Joint Legislative Budget Committee C>OVERNMENT CODE SECTIONS 9140-9143 PAGE 03/07 VI(M (iuix DENISE MORENO DUCHENY CALIFORNIA LEGISLATURE LECIMLATNE ANALYST ELIZABETH G. HILL 923 L STREET. SUITE IODO SACRAME M CALIFORNIA 95814 (916) 44546.56 September 15, 1997 Hon. Daniel E. Lungren Attorney General 1300 I Street, 17' Floor Sacramento, California 95814 Attention: Ms. Rosemary Calderon .Dear Attorney General Lungren: ASSEMBLY TONY CARI)RNAS JIM CUNNEEN FRED KELLtY CAROLE Mt(iDI:N GARY G MILLER CHARLES S. POOCHIGIAN RODERICK WRI(;IIT SEP 15 i�97 INITIATIVE COORDINATOR ATTORNFY GENIEW I5 OFFICE Pursuant to Elections Code 9005, we have reviewed the proposed initiative entitled "Voter Option to Redistribute Taxes to Local Government Act" (File No. SA 97 RF0024). MAJOR PROVISIONS OF THE INMATM This constitutional amendment would allow local residents to redirect state sales and -use tax revenues to their city or county. The measure also restricts the state's au- thority over certain matters of state and local taxation. Provisions Relating to Taxes Currently, the minimum rate throughout the state for the sales and use tax is 7.25 percent. As shown in Figure 1, this consists of a total state rate of 6.0 percent and a local rate of 1.75 percent. In addition, counties and some cities can levy additional trans- action and use taxes in their communities. 10/10/1997 00:35 818-858-5556 Hon. Daniel E. Lungren ENV. SVCS. '`PAGE 04/07 2 September 15, 1997 State Rates General Fund _5.00% General state purposes Lo M Revenue Fund 0.50 Local health and welfare programs Local Public Safety Fund O.SO Local public safety programs Local Uniform Rebs -6WNW-Gums" General 1.00% General city and county purposes Transportation 0.25 County transportaWn programs Local Add-on Rags Transaction and use taxes Up to 1.50% Transportation or other local programs) This measure would allow any City or county to adopt an ordinance to impose an additional local sales and use tax at a rate of th percent or 1 percent, to be phased in over a five-year period. This rate would replace an equivalent rate of state sales and use tax (the General Fund share). The local ordinance must be approved by two-thirds of the governing body and a majority of the voters. Provisions Restricting State Authority Under current law and the State Constitution, the state has significant authority to adjust the state and local uniform sales and use tax rates, as well as the allocation of all major local revenues (the local sales and use tax, vehicle license fee, and the property tax). Tn addition, the state has authority to modify local program responsibilities, partic- ularly county responsibilities. This measure limits this state's authority. Specifically, the measure specifies that the state's sales and use tax rate must be at least 4.75 percent. Thus, the state would no lon- ger have authority to significantly lower the state sales and use tax rate (potentially in concert with broadening the tax base). In addition, the state would be prohibited from altering the local Bradley -Bums tax rate, or changing the way in which Bradley -Burns or vehicle license fee revenues are.allocated among local governments. Finally, al- though the measure is not clear, some of its provisions could restrict the state's author- ity to reallocate the property tax, or make other fiscal or programmatic changes to local government during periods of state fiscal stress. "10%10/1997 00:35 818-858-5556 ENV. SVCS. PAGE 05/07 Hon. Daniel E. Lungren 3 September 15, 1997 Provisions Relating to Schools The California Constitution requires the state to provide a certain minimum level of funding for schools and community colleges. The California Constitution establishes three tests for determining this minimum level of funding. In general, decreases to the amount of funds deposited to the state's General Fund can have the effect of lowering the schools' minimum funding level. This measure includes provisions that appear to hold schools "harmless" from a shift of state sales and use tax revenues to localities. The measure's provisions, however, are not clear. Thus, the impact on schools from this revenue shift would depend on how these provisions were interpreted by the courts and on future legislative action. The measure also permits localities to allocate a portion of any new tax revenues to schools. FISCAL EFFECT State Government If all local governments implemented the maximum authorized redirection of sales and use tax revenues, state revenues would declare by about $4 billion annually. This revenue loss would be realized after a five-year phase-in period. The maximum amount of state revenue loss would.increase over time, along with growth in taxable sales. Assuming schools are held harmless from the impact of this revenue, the state would need to cut expenditures on nonschool programs (such as health and welfare, corrections, and higher education) and/or increase state taxes. A $4 billion reduction in nonschool expenditures equates to more than a 10 percent reduction in funding for nonsc lion,programs. In addition, by rest#ctirtg the state's authority to modify state and local taxes and local program responsibilities, the measure could significantly affect state costs or reve- nues. The fiscal impact of these provisions cannot be determined, but given the history of the state-Iocal fiscal relationship, they could be major. Local Government _,_ if all local governments implemented the authorized maximum redirection of sales and use tax revenues, city and county revenues would increase by about $4 billion an- nually. This revenue gain would be realized after a five-year phase-in period. Revenues would increase over time, along with growth in taxable sales.. 10/10/1997 00:35 818-858-5556 Hen. Daniel E. Lungren 4 ENV. SVCS. PAGE 06/07 September 15, 1997 Revenues from the increased local sales and use tax would be allocated to cities and counties proportionately, based on the population in each city and in the unincorpo- rated area bf each county that approves the increased local tax. The measure authorizes the State Board of Equalization to deduct from these local revenues its costs to allocate the sales and use taxes to local governments. Schools Assuming that schools are held harmless from the shift of revenues from the state to local government, school funding would not be negatively affected by implementation of this measure. In addition, if cities and counties grant a portion of these tax revenues to schools in their district, schools could experience revenue increases. SUMMARY The initiative would have the following major fiscal effects: State revenue losses—and comparable revenue gains to local government ----<)f up to $4 billion annually in five years. • Significant reduction in state fiscal flexibility. Sincerely, .11" -k - / 4C.4" / 47& Elizabe ./Hill •�� Legislative Analyst Craig L. Brown Director of Finance 10/10/1997. 00:35 818-858-5556 ENV. SVCS. =`PACS 07/07 CITY OF ALAMEDA RESOLUTION NO. 12926 SUPPORTING THE CONSTITUTIONAL INITIATIVE TO ALLOW A VOTER OPTION FOR REDISTRIBUTION OF TAXES TO LOCAL GOVERNMENT WHEREAS, cities only receive 12% of the statewide property taxes paid, only 13.8% of the statewide sales taxes, and no income -taxes; and WHEREAS, most cities have significant service obligations in the areas of public safety, infrastructure maintenance, park:, maintenance, capital improvements, building code enfc.-)rcement, and library services; and WHEREAS, taxpayers have demanded that government be h(�.kd accountable, control government spending, and that taxpayers get a return on their tax dollar investment in the form of local services; and WHEREAS, ,the current distribution of taxes threatens t:_he provisions of services provided by local government and has led to a concern amongst taxpayers as to where their tax dollars are } going; and u WHEREAS, in 1996 and 1997, about 300 cities supported legislation to redistribute one g' percent of sales taxes from the ¢ state to cities and counties to respond to the aforemention problems and concerns; and WHEREAS, the state Legislature did not pass the proposed legiQlation and insodoing denied both cities and counties the opportunity. -to_: -establish a permanent and dependable revenue -source out of existing tax dollars; and WHEREAS, by not passing the proposed legislation this; last year, the. State Legislature denied voters of the option _t.o redistribute revenue from the state to local government t-0 meet. local service needs as may be desired by local taxpayers. NOW, THEREFORE, BE IT RESOLVED, that the City Council of the City of Alameda does hereby support the Constitutional Initiative entitled "Voter Option to Redistribute Taxes to .:.Lc.)cal Government Act" as introduced to the Attorney General's off ice by the California Caucus for Cities and Schools. 1 `k From: Paul D. Stutrud To: Paul D. Stutrud P. 0. Box 2205 Rohnert Park CA 94927 10 October 1997 Mayor Linda Spiro Members of the City Council City of Rohnert Park 6750 Commerce Boulevard Rohnert Park CA 94928 Date: 10/11/87 Time: 18:35:05 RE; Brown Act & Planning Commission Economic Summit Members of the City Council: council coffespow,-, copy to ea. councilmen copy to coon to copy to J Page 1 of 9 On Thursday, 9 October 1997, a regularly scheduled Planning Commission meeting was held in the meeting room behind City Manager Joe Netter's office. The single agenda item was titled "General Plan Technical Update Work Session." For all means and purposes, Assistant City Manager Carl Leivo presided over the meeting. However, Chairman Militello made it a point to state that although the meeting was open to the public, it was not a public meeting. What about the Brown Act? What must be done to make sure that everyone understands the provisions of the Brown Act? There were five members of the general public present; Vdn Logan (a representative of landowners who want to be annexed), a student from Sonoma State University, Charles Kitchen, Linda Branscomb and myself. Van Logan is not a resident of Rohnert Park and I am not sure about the student. I video-taped a majority of the meeting. The issue I am raising again is the lack of publicity and promotion for these General Plan sessions and the exclusion of the residents of Rohnert Park in these very important. meetings. Carl Leivo knows better. He should be very conversant with the General Plan Guidelines produced by the State Office of Planning and Research (OPR) as well as the CODE of ETHICS of his own self-proclaimed membership in the American Institute of Certified Planners (copy enclosed for your interest). I am also protesting the fact that this meeting was touted as a workshop and was not meant for public input. Perhaps before anything further is done with this latest --• ... -planning-process, a mandatory workshop on the Brown Act should be conducted, along with a clear. review of the General Plan Guidelines. There is a maxim (you never. have time to do it right, but you always have time to do it over) which may end up being the case here if this process is not conducted in an ethical.manner that clearly invites and encourages public participation by all of the techniques described in the General Plan Guidelines -- of which the most appropriate for Rohnert Park would be a series of newspaper articles that explain in clear language all of the impacts and ideas (such as those discussed at the above-mentioned Planning Commission meeting), Mr. Leivo essentially wrote the General Plan update after the 1990 Harvey From: Paul D. Stutrud To: Dare: 10/11197 Time: 16:36:17 Page 2 of 9 Bell/Sierra Club General Plan Lawsuit. It is obvious he wants to write and control this latest process. Rohnert Park is paying the price for the follies of the last decade of poor planning decisions and it appears (in reading the Diversity of Opinion questionnaire) that there is a thinly veiled scheme to reach a consensus for more expansicn and development, which the City is in no position to accommodate. What this city should be promoting is stability and infill, while the majority of people can still afford to live here! Please read the enclosed paper from Oregon regarding the true costs of growth and then consider the benefits of stability. Who wrote the "Diversity of O inion" .questionnaire? It certainly was not an objective professional. It is .certainly not a questionnaire that would encourage the average citizen to complete. It certainly is obviously meant to invoke a biased and opinionated and directed result. One would have to know the history of Rohnert Park to answer some of the questions. Rohnert Park has been characterized as: "that tacky -tacky community on Highway 101" or; `there is no THERE there" because of the haphazard developer -driven lack of planning. The original master plan of Pau! Golis for Rohnert Park was a model that should have been followed. Mr. Golis's concept was that Rohnert Park would be a "working person's community" with an identifiable center of town and a development of the infra -structure in a mode that would be continuously affordable and within a stable budget. Among those provisions for Rohnert Park was having its own sewage treatment facilities (not as characterized in the Diversity of Opinion questionnaire). Rohnert Park is paying part of the price of Santa Rosa's growth instead of financing only what is needed for Rohnert Park as was envisioned in Golis's pay -as -you - grow and can afford it instead of the current scheme of continued and growing indebtedness that has found ever increasing costs for utilities and government. Growth is not imperative. There are thousands of communities across the United States that have not `grown" in 50 to a 100 years and yet they are quite healthy. On the other hand, there are too many cities and even counties that are going bankrupt because growth has been like a cancer that has eaten away the viability. It seems that a certain persuasion within Sonoma County and cities like Santa Rosa, Rohnert Park, Petaluma are striving to emulate San Jose, Los Angeles, Contra Costa County and are pushing the unwilling population majority into a financial disaster like Orange County or Butte County. Have any of the hired consultants commented on the cities that are in financial trouble (like Rohnert Park) and explained how and why they got that.way? In 1960, the City Council majority touted and promoted the relocation of Fireman's Fund out of San Francisco to a prominent site in Novato. There were all the usual optimistic promises of what great things would happen to the economy of Novato, such as increases in property values, more business activity, etc. PAGE 2 From: Pati D. Stutrud To: Date: 10/11/97 Time: 18:37:31 Page 3 of 9 But the reality of Fireman's Fund plan set in when it was learned that 80% of the employees of Fireman's Fund had a median income of $18,000 per year and could not afford to move to Novato, where the average cost of a home was $130,000 and required a rnedian income of $54,000 per year for qualified buyers. There was a sparse stock of affordable housing and consequently, many average employees of Fireman's Fund opted to stay in the City of San Francisco and seek employment elsewhere. I could cite similar examples of the move by Bank of America or Wells Fargo out of San Francisco to Concord. Even top employees were reluctant to move or follow the companies. What about Rohnert Park and the long -neglected, yet -to -be -approved Housing Element? High-tech companies are desirable but realistically, the employees are still moderately paid at best and still seek affordable housing. If there is no available affordable housing then High-tech business growth will only add to the already congested grid lock on Highway 101 and exacerbate the current housing stock problem. The Diversity of Opinion poll blatantly promotes high-end housing, up -scale shopping and other "dream" schemes and yet, the demographics of Rohnert Park do not support this, except in the eyes of the developers who only look after their own profit taking. The bottom line of this economic summit should be of what can be done to keep Rohnert Park affordable -- the month-to-month cost of living here as reflected in the costs of water, sewage, garbage and normal infrastructure costs like police, fire and public works maintenance. Growth means higher costs for expansion of sewage, water and waste disposal and this can be easily recounted by reviewing the bi-monthly utility billings by the City of Rohnert Park and the increases over the past ten or fifteen years. These costs have not kept up with the average worker's wages and these costs have certainly put a strain on those people on fixed incomes. How many more increases can they withstand? The other question to ask of this economic summit is what caused businesses like Copperfield's or the French Quarter to disappear? These are the kind of businesses that provide the "THERE" where people gather and socialize. Is it realistic to ever expect Rohnert Park to have the ambiance and character of the hometowns that many of. us came from? What- about the cost of Rohnert Park's city management? The exorbitant salaries, the perks, the cost of outside consultants for many of the things that should be done in-house? What about the cost of Public Safety versus the value of protection? Why is Rohnert Park's police protection so expensive as compared to cities like Oakland, San Jose or Richmond? What about full-time city wide fire protection? How does this fit into the scheme of things in an economic summit? A major business would certainly take a look at this as a factor for locating here. PAGE It From: Paul D. Stutrud To: Date: 10/11/97 Time: 18:38:43 Page 4 of 9 To reiterate the issues and problems of Rohnert Park, we do not have adequate sewage capacity, and yet, we do have a commitment to Canon Manor for both sewage and water as a result of the damages done to them by the construction of 'M' and 'R' Sections. We also have a commitment to the citizens of Rohnert Park to avoid any higher costs for sewage. In spite of the rosy picture about Rohnert Park's water capabilities, there is still a question of water delivery and quality. What about the alleged 130 foot draw -down of the aquifer that occurred during the last major drought? How does this factor into the big picture of obtaining Russian River water? What about Public Safety? What is the cost factor of getting the four existing fire stations fully operational and with legally complying crews, as well as a fifth fire station on the West Side? What about the Quan Kao lawsuit and the spinoff this lawsuit is going to bring to the cost of operation of Public Safety? What about the unresolved problems of defective construction? What about the problems with the failing water systems in 'R' and 'M' sections and the numerous pending construction defect litigations? What about the commercial vacancy factor and the vacant commercial acreage within the city limits? What about the traffic problems and impacts within the city's streets and neighborhoods? Are these attractive to potential businesses? Who is paying for this latest round of speakers and consultants? Why are we doing all of this when the answers to the problems are obvious. Rohnert Park needs to clean up its act and stop cow -towing to developers who only see this community as a pushover for their schemes (as .they have in the past). Consult with the citizens of Rohnert Park through a series of neighborhood meetings. Let them know what is going on instead of having to read about what has already been done. Get some articles published in the Community Voice on every aspect of planning, and every required Element of the General Plan. Consult with them and encourage them to participate. So far, Rohnert Park residents have been excluded from far too many steps and it would be a shame, to have to resort to legal measures to allow their voices to be heard. Explain why members of the 20 Year General Plan committee a were not sent invitations to participate in the Saturday morning tour. I highly recommend that the city council and planning commission be furnished with copies of the General Plan Guidelines and subscriptions to the Planning Commissioner's Journal and that a workshop be held on invoking public participation. Rohnert Park needs honesty in government and this is a good place to start. Paul D. Stutrud cc, Community Voice Enclosures: AICP Code of Ethics Sonoma County Independent Oregon Study on the cost of growth Press Democrat TV 50 From: Paul D. Stutrud To. Date: 10/11/97 Time: 18:39:54 Page 5 of 9 Dave Eck American Institute of Certified Planners 1776 Massachusetts Avenue, N.W. Washington DC 20036 AMERICAN PLANNING ASSOCIATION Statement of Ethical Principles for Planning 1 . Serve the Public Interest. The primary obligation of planners and public planning officials is to serve the public interest. 2. Support Citizen Participation in Planning. Because the definition of the public interest is continuously modified, the planner and public planning official must recognize the right of citizens to influence planning decisions that affect their well being. They should advocate a forum of meaningful citizen participation and expression in the planning process and assist in the clarification of community goals, objectives and policies in plan -making. 3. Recognize the Comprehensive and Long-range Nature of Planning Decisions. The planner and public planning official must recognize and have special concern for the comprehensive and long-range nature of planning decisions. The planner and official must balance and integrate physical (including historical, cultural, and natural), economic, and social characteristics of the community or area affected by those decisions. The planner and official must continuously gather and consider all relevant facts, alternatives, and means of accomplishing them. The planner and official should explicitly evaluate all consequences before making a recommendation or decision. 4. Expand Choice and Opportunity for All Persons. The planner and public planning official must strive to expand choice and opportunity for all persons, recognize a special responsibility to plan for the needs of disadvantaged people, and urge changing policies, institutions and decisions that restrict their choice and opportunities. 5. Facilitate Coordination Through the Planning Process. The planner and public planning official must facilitate coordination. The planning process should enable all those concerned with an issue to learn what other participants are doing, thus permitting coordination of activities and efforts and accommodation of interests. The planner and official must -ensure that individuals and public and private agencies possibly affected by a prospective planning decision receive adequate information far enough in advance of the decision. 6: Avoid Conflict of Interest. To avoid conflict of interest and even the appearance of impropriety, the public planning official who may receive some private benefit from a public planning decision -must not participate in that decision. The private benefit may be direct or indirect, create a material personal gain, or provide an advantage to relations, friends, groups, or associations that hold a significant share of the official's loyalty. An official witha conflict of interest must make that interest public, abstain from voting on the matter, and leave any chamber in which such deliberations are tc take place. The official Must not discuss the matter privately with any other official voting on the matter. A private sector planner who has previously worked for a public planning body on a plan. or project should not appear before that body representing a private client in connection with proposals affecting that plan or project for one year after the planner's last date of employment with the planning body. From: Paul D. Stutrud To: Date: 10/11/87 Time: 18:41:14 Page 6 of 9 7. Render Thorough and Diligent Planning Service. The planner and public planning official must render thorough and diligent planning service. Should the planner or official believe s/he can no longer render such service in a thorough and diligent manner, s/he should resign from the position. If the official has not sufficiently reviewed relevant facts and advice affecting a public planning decision, the official must not participate in that decision. 8. Not Seek or Offer Favors. The public sector planner or public planning official must seek no favor. The planner and official must not directly or indirectly solicit any gift or accept or receive any gift (whether in money, services, loans, travel, entertainment, hospitality, promises, or in some other form) under circumstances in which it could be reasonably inferred that the gift was intended or could be reasonably be expected to influence them in the performance of their duties or was intended as a reward for any recommendation or decision on their part. The private,sector planner must not offer any gifts or favors to influence the recommendation or decision of a public sector planner or public planning official. The private sector planner should oppose such action by a client. 9. Not Disclose or Improperly Use Confidential Information for Financial Gain. The planner and public planning official must not disclose or improperly use confidential information .for financial gain. The planner and official must not disclose to others confidential information acquired in the course of their duties or use it to further a personal interest. Exceptions to this requirement of non -disclosure may be made only when (a) required by process of law, or (be) required to prevent a clear violation of law, or (c) required to prevent substantial injury to the public. Disclosure pursuant to (b) and (c) must not be made until after the planner or official has verified the facts and issues involved, has exhausted efforts to obtain reconsideration of the matter, and has sought separate opinions on the issue from other planners or officials. 10. Ensure Access to Public Planning Reports and Studies on an Equal Basis. The public planning official must ensure that reports and records of the public planning body are open equally to all members of the public. All non -confidential information available to the official must be made available in the same form to the public in a timely manner at reasonable or no cost. 1 1 . Ensure Full Disclosure at Public Hearings. The public planning official must ensure that the presentation of information on behalf of any party to a planning question occurs only at the scheduled public hearing on the question, not in private, unofficially, or with other interested parties absent. The official must make partisan information regarding the question received in the mail or by telephone or other communication part of the public record. 12. Maintain Public Confidence. The public planning .official must conduct himself/herself publicly so as to maintain public confidence in the public planning body, the official's unit of government, and the official's performance of the public trust. 13. Respect Professional Codes of=Ethics and Conduct. -The planner and public planning official must respect the professional codes of ethics and conduct established by the American Institute of Certified Planners (AICP) Commission and by several professions related to the practice of planning. Professional codes commonly establish standards of professional conduct and include provisions that protect the integrity of professional judgment and describe the professional's responsibility to the public, clients, employers and colleagues. From: Pad D. 8tutrud To: Date: 10/11/97 Time: 18:42:40 Page 7 of 9 From: Planning Commissioners Journal -- Planners 'kVeb To: 'Paul D. Stutrud" <Stutrudla?gnn.com= To: Planning Commissioners Journal on-line reviewers From: Wa-,me M. Senville, Editor, pc'(a�togethennet Subj: Draft article by Eben Fodor Date: November 7, 1996 Set out below is a draft article prepared by Eben Fodor. Your comments, reaction, questions. are most ,welcome. If you are comfortable doing so, you can also cc your comments to Fodor at: fodor;a�efmorg. Please reply with your comments no later than Saturday, November 16th. Again. I appreciate your taking the time to review this article and help improve the quality of our publication. The Real Cost of Growth in Oregon By Eben V. Fodor (Submitted to Planning Commissioners Journal) While we hear much about the benefits of growth, the costs have been largely ignored. What arc these costs? Who is paying them. and how much are they paving? A search for answers to these questions prompted a literature review and an independent research project. 'llie findings arc reported in The Real Cost of Growth in Oregon, issued by the author in July 1996. The research represents an initial effort to provide a more complete understanding of the current fiscal impacts of growth. The literature review identified more than two dozen growth -related cost areas (see Figure 1). However, this research project focused on the easily-idetrtifiable public costs for providing the basic physical infr-astructure necessary to serve urban development. Defining Growth-Retated Costs It can be difficult to distinguish growth -related costs from other public costs. It is helpful to start by examining the differences in public expenditures between two hypothetical scenarios: 1) a nongrowing or stable community, and 2) a growing community. These two scenarios are illustrated in Figure 2. In the first scenario, the stable city has had a fairly constant population for some time. All the necessary public facilities -- roads, suhools,.firc stations, parks and government facilities -- have already been built and paid for. Taxes are still being collected, and public revenues go to pay for ongoing services and operation and maintenance (O&M) costs. There is no need to expand or build additional facilities as long as existing facilities are properly maintained. Some facilities will wear out and need to be replaced. These facility replacements (such as a neAN heating system for a school) are pail of the O&M budget. However, if the stable city becomes a growing city, there will be additional costs to build new or expanded facilities to supply the increased demand resulting from new growth. These are clearly growth -related costs because they do not exist in the stable city scenario, Each increment of growth creates an incremental increase in demand for physical infrastructure. When the costs for new facilities are paid through property taxes (as with a bond issue or lcvy), they are spread across the entire community. If the area of new growth in the growing city of Figure 2 represents about Faae 7 From: Pau! D. Stutrud To: Dale: 10/11/97 Time: 18:43:52 Page 8 of 9 10 percent of the total population. then these new residents will pay only 10 percent of the cost of the new facilities required to serve them. The other 90 percent %N-111 be paid by the existing residents. In this manner, existing residents continue to pay a greater -share of new infrastructure costs required to serve new development. The more the city grows, the g -cater the -burden on existing residents to pay the costs. Development impact fees, or system development charg�-s, are a means of correcting this inequity. Note that the new school and fire station shown in Figure 2 may be shared by the entire eolmmanity. None -the -less_ the need for these facilities did not exist iu the stable city scenario, because the old facilities were already adequate. This illustrates why most, or all; of the costs of these new facilities are correctly attributed to growth. Also note that both growth scenarios have O&M costs that vary in rough proportion to the size of the population. Property tax revenues will increase, to some extent, to match the increasing costs of a growing community. However, state law in Oregon limits increases in total tax revenues to six percent per year (without a public vote). Combined growth and interest rates that exceed the six percent level will place an additional burden on city resources, without providing additional resources. Methodology A "proportionate share" costing method is used to determine the public infrastructure costs assv,;iated with the construction of a typical single-family house. Each iltcrement of growth is allocated costs only for the increment of system capacity required to serve it. For evaluation purposes, a typical three-bedrocnn, single-family house is used. This representative house has 3.09 occupants. includ n0.67 school-age children (based on the American Housing Survey). It is constnicted on a modest 6,000 square foot lot and is assumed to be part of a larger development in an urban area on previously undeveloped land, but with utilities nearby. To simplify accounting, the analysis assumes that all infi-astructure requirements are met with new facilities. If the needs of new development are met with existing excess capacity, the value of the existing infrastructure can be estimated and assigned to the development in the same manner as new infrastructure. Also, not all of the public costs associated with growth will be paid by local taxpayers. Nlany public works projects receive Federal and state contributions. Costs of Growth An analysis of seven public infrastructure cost areas associated with the construction of a typical single-family house -- including public facilities for schools, sewer, storm drainage, roads, water service, parks and recreation; and fire protection — show's that the total cost is about $24,500 per house (see Table 1). System cost figures are based on representative projects recently completed or underway in Oregon. The result is a composite of recent cost data selected to be representative of the state as a whole and not intended to reflect the actual costs for any particular municipality. New Single -Family house Cost Item Amount Page 8 From: Pau! D. Stutrud To: Date: 10/11/97 Time: 18:45:07 Page 9 of 9 Table 1 Growth Cost Sununary` School Facilitics ................... $11,377 Sanitary Sewerage .... _ ............. $5,089 Transportation Facilities .............. $4,193 Water System Facilities .............. $2,066 Parks and Recreation Facilities ......... $797 Storm water Drainage ................. 5510 Firc Protcction/EMS Facilities .......... $470 Total: ........................... $24,502 *This is a stnnmary of the costs reviewed in this study and is not a complete listing of growth -related costs New school facilities are the single highest cost category, at $11,377 per new house. This figure is based on a well-documcntcd,methodology and is correlated with 1995 school construction cost data for Springfield. Sanitary Sewer vosts of $5,089 per house are based on figures for a new sewage facility under construction in McMinnville. Road costs of S4,193 are based on the number of new lane -miles required to serve the new vehicle -trips generated by the occupants of an average single-family house. Road construction costs are from 1993 figures for the City of Woodburn. Water system costs of $2,066 per new house are from a recent report by Eugene Water and Electric Board on a proposed system development charge. A proportionate share ofthe costs of other core infrastructure categories (including police stations, libraries, and other essential government facilities) should also be allocated to new growth. And many of the envtronmcntal and other costs of growth can be put in monetary terns using various methods of economic valuation. These indirect pricing methods were beyond the scope of this analysis but are gaining greater acceptance and can be used to improve economic decision-making. Given the high public cost of land development, communities may want to consider other land use options. At the estimated cost of $24,502 per house, the public cost per developed acre is $147,012 (at 6 units per acre). Typical costs for undeveloped land inside the urban growth boundary in Oregon are $15,000 to $35,000 per acre -- a fraction of the public cost of allowing the land to be developed. For many communities, public acquisition of land for open space and other purposes may be a viable, cost-saving alternative to development. The methodology used in this analysis can be easily replicated and may provide a useful tool for communities trying to obtain better information about the economic and fiscal impacts of urban growth. About the Author: Mr. Fodor is a conununity planning and sustainability consultant. He holds a Master's degree in I Irban and Regional Planning, a Master of Science degree in Environmental. Studies from the University of Oregon and a B.S. degree in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin. You can reach him at Energy & Environmental Planning Associates, (541) 345-8246 or by email: fodordefn.org. Copies of the report The Real Cost of Growth in Oregon may be ordered from Energy and Environmental Planning .Associates, 394 East 32nd Ave., Eugene, OR 97405. The cost is $25 (payable to: EEPA) includes shipping. Page U Sonoma County Community Development Commission Housing Authority • Redevelopment Agency 1440 Guerneville Road. Santa Rosa, CA 95403-4107 JOSEPH D NETTER, CITY MANAGER CITY OF ROHNERT PARK 6750 COMMERCE BLVD ROHNERT PARK CA. 94928 October 10, 1997 Council Corresponden1,01 Copy to ea. Councilma Copy to Copy to F l Copyto /4-/6-97 RE: Quarterly Report for the Period Ending September 30, 1997 Rohnert Park Mobile Home Earthquake Resistant Bracing System Program Dear Mr. Netter: Members of the Commission James Harberson Chairman Paul L Kelley Vice Chairman Michael J. Cale Tim Smith Mike Reilly Janie V. Walsh Executive Director During the past three months, Sonoma County Community Development Commission (SCCDC) staff has performed a variety of administrative, application -processing and contract activities as discussed below. Administrative Activities Meetings were held with the Community Development Commission of the City of Rohnert Park (CDCRP) staff to review and approve change orders, grant applications, and an extension of the contract between the CDCRP and the Sonoma County Community Development Commission, for administration of the program. Application Processing Activities T'� c+t-•e 197 3r^r^.!!^wt:^ns have heSn_received. ThP r—CCDC. and the rnCRP have Granted approval on 140 applications, 136 homes have been placed under contract and 136 ERBS installations have been completed. Contract Activities One Change Order, which altered the contract, was signed by CDCRP and Pacific Bracing Company (contractor). This Change Order added 10 -mobile homes to the contract. Meetings were also conducted with the contractor to review work in progress. Field inspections were conducted on completed installations. Phase XVII was completed and payment has been made to the contractor. Telephone (707) 524-7500 FAX (707) 524-7557 • TDD (707)524-7555 Joseph D. Netter, City Manager Rohnert Park ERBS Grant Program October 9, 1997 Page 2 The statistics shown below indicate program activity through September 30, 1997. Original Budget: FY96/97 $250,000 Applications Received: 197 Drops or Disqualifications 37 Applications in Process 20 Grants Approved: 140 Drops after Approval 1 Jobs in Bidding Process 3 $ 5.049 Contracts Signed: 136 Drop after Contract 0 Jobs under Construction 0 $ 0 Jobs Completed 136 $206,786 Budget Balance: Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions about the information presented here or if you would like to discuss the ERBS program in greater detail. Sincerely, Bob Branson Community Development Specialist c: Carl E. Leivo, Assistant to the City Manager k Sonoma County Community Development Commission Housing Authority • Redevelopment Agency 1440 Guerneville Road, Santa Rosa, CA 95403-4107 October 10, 1997 JOSEPH D NETTER, CITY MANAGER ' CITY OF ROHNERT PARK 6750 COMMERCE BLVD ROHNERT PARK CA. 94928 Re: Quarterly Report for the CDBG Mobile Home Earthquake Resistant Bracing System Program Dear Mr. Netter: Members of the Commission James Harberson Chairman Paul L Kelley Vice Chairman Michael J. Cale Tim Smith Mike Reilly Janie V. Walsh Executive Director ' Below is a status report on the City of Rohnert Park's CDBG-funded Mobile Home Earthquake Resistant Bracing System Program. The statistics shown indicate program activity through September 30, 1997. Original Budget: FY96/97 $194,881 Applications Received: 131 Drops or Disqualifications 24 Applications in Process 14 Grants Approved: • 93 Drops after Approval 4 Jobs in Bidding Process 18 $ 26,730. Contracts Signed: 71 Jobs under Construction 71 $ 87,261 Jobs Completed 0 $ 0 Budget Balance: $ 80.890 Grant agreements for the initial seventy-one recipients of the Earthquake Resistant Bracing System, v:ere siy^8d ky Carl E. I Ju!y.31, 1997. .On September 8, 1997 the City of Rohnert Park and Merriman's (Contractor) signed the contract for the installation of these systems for the amount of $87,057. The installation of additional systems will be added via Change Order. Please let me know if you have any questions regarding this report or if you would like to discuss program activity in further detail. Sincerely, Bob Branson Community Development Specialist c: Carl E. Leivo, Assistant to the City Manager Telephone (707) 524-7500 FAX (707) 524-7557 • TDD (707) 524-7555 , t 8-1 3�1 957 2: S 1 RI • j I� I I SONOMA CO. BOS/CAO 707-527-3778 4 707 793 7274 NO. 399 902 17RON PETERSON CONSLT. INC 916dd 1 2279 P, d GOVERNOR PETE WILSON 0T.1 a 199 o the Members of the California Assembly: 1 an rctvtnitns Assembly Bill No. 1362 without my signature. Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman Copy to ' Copy to Copy to /o _1y -'?7,6, This bill would ma�ssaeasw•�►`—`�- rat+Fh**+�fl �h P-�e C �erc in anta,l oun utsrnrtat� AAM ority v- CCruardino. 11 Cal. 4`220 (1995) inawlinahlP nation or needing in which the validity of a tax or tau increase is contested.. -if the ordivarlcc or oluUvu imposing - - - that tax was adopted prrorto December 14,1995." That decision upheld constirutiorality of Government Code Section 53722 (which wars enacted as part of ,position 62) and disapproved of a 1991 appellate deoision (Qtv of WoodlaLe. v. Vnaonl ich had held portions of Proposition 62 unconesdtutional. This bill is uuconstitut)vnal. Article 11, Sectinn 10 (c) or the California Constitution "-['The Legislature] may amend or repeal ant initiative stature by another statute that becomes effective only when approved by the electors unless the initiative statute permits zunendment or repeal without their approval.' Proposition 62, of which Govermnent Code Section 53722 was part, is an initiative statute and provided that it coald only be amended by a vote of the electorate. Thus. the Legislature cannot amend it, except through a vote of the People. Nontheless, this bill seeks to amend the effective date of Proposition 62 by mAing the _ decision u ho g.the..�tssituio_na,.Q•th_e 1?roposition,aply�oniy tp_a5 co�testin t es ey ijeo on or after DecemX ftX.1,4,L 1.995. "Where a new section affects the application of the original. statute or implicitely modifies its provisions," it is an amendment (See, e.g., Huening v. Eta, 231 Cal, App. 3d 161, 779 (1991).) I am not unsympathetic, however, to those local governments which relied on the 1991 appellate decisioa, and note that while th?y have no remedy with the Legislature, they have remedies in the courts and through the initiative process with the eiectotate. Indeed, the courts will rule that their decisions have prubpectivc effect only based on the reasonahleness of the STATE CAPITOL - SACRAMENTO. CALIFORNIA 95b14 - (916) -}41-2841 W 15:23 B M2 sae Two SONOMA CO. BOS/CAO 707-527-3778 4 707 793 7274 FRDNI PETERSON CONSLT, INC 91 SA4.12279 NO. 399 1?03 P, S U artier' reliance on the previous cases or rule &nd the etfeet of a rewoactive decision on the dminigtration of justice. (See, e.g., Carn�vWork rs„�,' C0102. 6=01s - d-, 3 Cal. 40'679, 688 1992).) If focal government believes &at a retroactive application of the Cr=dina decision .isrupts tlicir reasonable reliance, on a prior decision, as the legislature's findings indicate, they ave a ready remedy in the courts. Cordially, PETE WILSON Phillip W. & Sara Dawn Shafer 820 Hudis Street Rohnert Park, CA 94928 October 12, 1997 Cory t, - City of Rohnert Park City Council Members and Parks & Recreation Commissioners Rohnert Park, CA -- pn.7 yn. J We are unable to attend your public hearing on your proposal to build a flat skate park on land currently named "Honeybee Park" . This letter is written in place of our public appearance with the intention that our opinion/suggestions will bP�nmP a dart �f the ni ihliro.•r+ .)14c -- � - We are not opposed to a skate park in the City of Rohnert Park. However, we feel that there are more appropriate sites for this type of recreational facility. We urge you to examine areas more closely identifiable with: 1. The Rohnert Park Sports Center, Expressway & Snyder or 2. The baseball stadium, Labath Avenue or 3. The Public Safety Building, City Hall Dr. All of these sites appear to have available land for this use and would not diminish the size of an already established. neighborhood park adjacent to an elementary school. Placing a skate park in a particular section means that skaters from other sections of the City would have to travel to take advantage of the facility, not exactly fair to those residing in another area of the City. If the skate park were sited at any of the above - listed, centrally located, already established community facilities, skaters in any particular section of the City would not be favored. We urge you to reconsider your recommendation for a skate park located in Honeybee or any other neighborhood park unless you plan to construct similar facilities in every one. Sincerely, _---"�" -'•'y y/tel ��... ��t-,/ �'� G"� Phillip Shafer Sara Dawn Shafer _ October 13. 1997 SONOMA C O U N T Y! 1 WAT E R 1 i i A G E\ C Y Council Corge ncodem Copy to ea. Councilman r a r , 4 ;y9i Joe Netter, City Manager Copy to 60 24 4,4A/ City of Rohnert Park Copy to �,A, n 6750 Commerce Boulevard Copy to Rohnert Park, CA 94928 SEPTEMBER MONTHLY REPORT - ROHNERT PARK TOILET REPLACEMENT PROGRAM - ROHNERT PARK PROJECT #1997-6 Summary. A total of 2,127 toilets have been replaced. To date, 781 Direct Installation applications and 117 Rebate applications have been received and processed. Upgrade Payments to the City of Rohnert Park (City). Residential and some small business program participants may choose to pay a fee to the City to upgrade from the standard gravity flush toilet to a pressure -assisted ($120) or a vacuum -assisted ($90) toilet. Full payment can be made, or payment terms may be set up with the City's Finance Department. * Pressure Assisted Toilet. ** Vacuum Assisted Toilet Costs. The following chart shows the number of toilets installed, and the cost per program: Upgrade Payments PAT* VAT** .......................july.........._..........:..............----........................... July _....:.. $630 _ _ 3 -3 ....................... _................_........:.........................----....---......_. August __._.:. 1,170 --.:.-..................... 6 6 ...... _......... P September __:..............................._------..__------- ... :.................. 1,230 8 3 ........................ -................. TOTALS _ ...... ...... $3,030 ...............__..:........ ....;..................._... 17_ 12 * Pressure Assisted Toilet. ** Vacuum Assisted Toilet Costs. The following chart shows the number of toilets installed, and the cost per program: Program Follow-up. Approximately 80 program -surveys were.returned this month. Most respondents were complimentary regarding the contractor, Action Plumbing Company, and the City's program. A few complaints were received, including a defective toilet, clean-up being required after installation, and surprise regarding the additional cost for floor flanges (<$10) and toilet seats ($8.- $10). All complaints were responded to quickly, and replacements/repairs made as necessary. Lynn ulme Water Conservation Specialist c Randy Poole, Ali Davidson, Renee Webber, Ellen Dowling Joe Gaffney, City Engineer, City of Rohnert Park, 6750 Commerce Blvd., Rohnert Park, CA 94927 John Nelson, Water Resources Management, 1833 Castle Drive, Petaluma, CA 94954 Michael Harrow, Finance Director, City of Rohnert Park, P.O. Box 1489, Rohnert Park, CA 94927-1489 Virginia Porter, City of Santa Rosa, 69 Stony Circle, Santa Rosa, CA 95401 d:\rs3\u\cl\mh\wc\ulf 0997.rpk P.O. Box 11628 - Santa Rosa, CA 95406 - 2150 W. College Avenue - Santa Rosa, CA 95.301 - (707) 526-5370 -'Fax (707) 544-6123 TOILETS REPLACED ..................._-_.-_--..............._........... Pnor Months _. __ This Month ................_.. Toilet Total :............... Cost _._.:.........:..._._..........:.........................................:.........._ SCWA Admintstratton _......................:............ =............ i............................................... ................................ i.----.............................._........ - .... -.._._.--...... $14,978 .... ... _ .._.._..................................... Rebate Program 202 ..._.__....................... 26 228 22,750 ......................._..............:.........._.......--•--.................:..__..........._ Direct Installation 852 -...................i.......................-----...................i....................._..._....._..__.... 215 1,067 108,935 Special Event 832 ........................................... 0 832 _. ... 97,715 .......................... ._.- .............................. : Total 1,886 241 2,127 $244,378 Program Follow-up. Approximately 80 program -surveys were.returned this month. Most respondents were complimentary regarding the contractor, Action Plumbing Company, and the City's program. A few complaints were received, including a defective toilet, clean-up being required after installation, and surprise regarding the additional cost for floor flanges (<$10) and toilet seats ($8.- $10). All complaints were responded to quickly, and replacements/repairs made as necessary. Lynn ulme Water Conservation Specialist c Randy Poole, Ali Davidson, Renee Webber, Ellen Dowling Joe Gaffney, City Engineer, City of Rohnert Park, 6750 Commerce Blvd., Rohnert Park, CA 94927 John Nelson, Water Resources Management, 1833 Castle Drive, Petaluma, CA 94954 Michael Harrow, Finance Director, City of Rohnert Park, P.O. Box 1489, Rohnert Park, CA 94927-1489 Virginia Porter, City of Santa Rosa, 69 Stony Circle, Santa Rosa, CA 95401 d:\rs3\u\cl\mh\wc\ulf 0997.rpk P.O. Box 11628 - Santa Rosa, CA 95406 - 2150 W. College Avenue - Santa Rosa, CA 95.301 - (707) 526-5370 -'Fax (707) 544-6123 SONOMA COUNTY WATER AGENCY YEAR ONE BUDGET PROPOSAL WORKSHEET ACTUAL EXPENDITURES - BUDGET YEAR 1996/97 Project Name: Rohnert Park Water Conservation Toilet Replacement Program Agency Project Number:2319-10 City of Rohnert Park Project Number: 1997-6 Prepared By: Lynn Hulme 1997 Actual Costs Estimated Budget $7,740 $3,210 $12,304 $5,746 $428,608 (Total Cost $3,806 $1,438 $2,411 $1,246 $3,309 $36,678 $75,025 $123,913 a sos I March April May June July Aug Sept .Year to Date Activity Total A Startup, Marketing $806 $143 $1,153 $0 $613 $2,715 G Newspaper Ad E ' Kickoff Meeting N 'Printing & Mailing C Implernentation-RFP $3,000 $102 $0 $0 $0 $3,102 Y Administration $0 $1,193 $1,258 $1,246 $1,258 $1,429 $1,021 $7,404 'Printing Forms Follow-up & Reports $0 $0 $0 $0 $1,439 $318 $1,757 City Materials & Contractors $0 $0 $0 $0 $0 $34.931 $74.004 $108 935 Estimated Budget $7,740 $3,210 $12,304 $5,746 $428,608 (Total Cost $3,806 $1,438 $2,411 $1,246 $3,309 $36,678 $75,025 $123,913 a sos I COTATI-ROHNERT PARK UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT Council Correspondence Copy to ea. Councilman COPY to BUILDING BRIDGES MEETING Copy to Copy to WEDNESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 1997 3:30 P.M. -- 5:00 P.M. CONFERENCE ROOM CITY OF ROHNERT PARK DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC SAFETY .r 4 y9�! This meeting is to re -connect everyone who attended the workshop in May, and hear about what is happening with the various sub -committees. If you have questions please contact Kim Bricker.at"792-471 1. We look forward to seeing you. Date l .mem California School Leadership Academy North Bay School Leadership Center. and Sonoma County Office of Education Curriculum. & Instruction Department present. 1. Open Minds, Open Arms, Open Hearts: Diversity In Our Schools with Randy & Delores Lindsey Randy, Chair of University of Redlands Department of Education, served for 22 years as professor of education administration at Cal State, Los Angeles, and is a former secondary teacher and administrator. Issues of racism have passionately interested him throughout his educational career. Delores, Director of Program Delivery for the San Bernardino CSLA School Leadership Center, wor'k-ed in secondary schools as a teacher and administrator. Diversity has been a long-term focus of her professional development. Monday, November 3, 1997 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m. Sonoma County Office of Education 5340 Skylane Boulevard Santa Rosa, California Oak Rooms D & E If you're committed to giving every student -- regardless of ethnicity or gender —the same opportunities for success in school, then come to our new seminar on November 3. We all know that there's more racial, ethnic, cultural, economic, and language diversity in our schools than ever before. And we know that students who feel they don't "belong" in a school community are the most likely to demonstrate behavior problems, drop out of school, or otherwise fail to be successful. We've heard local students describe intense personal experiences of discrimination and tell us how this affects their ability to learn. Many of us have also witnessed incidents of discrimination in the classroom and on school campuses. But the fact is that many of us have been inactive in addressing school-based incidents of discrimination not from lack of caring, but from not knowing what to do. At this seminar, you'll learn: • How discrimination appears in subtle, yet serious ways in our school communities. • Why your colleagues have such varied reactions to anv vlans or programs to address racism and end discrimination. • What a leader in a district or at a school needs to know to move forward in eliminating discrimination. • New facilitation skills that will help your school or district further its commitment to success for all students. For reservations, please fill out the registration form and return to Minerva Haddad at North Bay SLC before October 27. Registration fee is $25. Lunch is included. Please make POs or checks payable to NBSLC/SCOE. Telephone 524-277. Registration Fon Name School Name & Address City State Zip Telephone Cotati-Rohnert Park Unified 1601 East Cotati Avenue Rohnert Park, CA 94928 % (p3 List Corrections'! Call 511-2827) Pacific Gas and Electric Company Mr. Joseph D. Netter City Manager City of Rohnert Park 6750 Commerce Boulevard Rohnert Park, CA 94928 Dear Mr. Netter: Council Correspondence copy to ea. Councilman Copy to Copy to Copy to /0-20 October 1,5, 1997 1 ' 199 Re: 3rd Quarter Outage Report The following is a record of reported unplanned electric outages within the City of Rohnert Park during the 3rd quarter of 1997. August 16, 1997 - A failed underground connector caused an outage lasting 3 hours for 377 customers in the Eleanor Avenue area. August 26, 1997 - While performing maintenance on an overhead transformer a fuse broke resulting in an outage of 30 minutes for 1900 cus